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President Trump hosts Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., on Feb. 10. North Korea tested a missile during Abe's visit last weekend, one of several provocative actions by U.S. rivals during the first month of Trump's presidency. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Parallels - World News

U.S. Rivals Test Trump, And So Far The Response Is Restrained

Iran and North Korea have fired off missiles. A Russian spy ship floats off the U.S. coast. To date, President Trump's reaction has been very much from the traditional foreign policy playbook.

Protesters gather outside Jefferson Middle School in Washington, where Education Secretary Betsy DeVos paid her first visit as education secretary. Maria Danilova/AP hide caption

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Maria Danilova/AP

NPR Ed

Trump On Autism, DeVos Protests And More Ed Stories Of The Week

With Secretary Betsy DeVos rolling up her sleeves at the Education Department and, at one point this week, joining Donald Trump at the White House to talk with educators and parents, Washington, D.C., is making a lot of education news these days.

John Lu (from left), 19, Reynold Liang, 19, and David Wu attend a news conference in Queens after being the victims of a hate crime in 2006. New York City Council Member David Weprin (second from left) and John C. Liu look on. Adam Rountree/AP hide caption

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Adam Rountree/AP

Code Switch

First-Ever Tracker Of Hate Crimes Against Asian-Americans Launched

After years of declining numbers, hate crimes against Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders are rising exponentially. But good statistics are hard to come by.

A woman traveling alone with her infant, seeming to understand that she will be arrested, walks toward Canadian police on the far side of the border. Kathleen Masterson/VPR hide caption

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Kathleen Masterson/VPR

U.S.

Migrants Choose Arrest In Canada Over Staying In The U.S.

Vermont Public Radio

A rural road in northern New York has become a magnet for refugees who no longer want to stay in the U.S. Growing numbers are stepping into Canada, knowing Mounties immediately will arrest them.

Migrants Choose Arrest In Canada Over Staying In The U.S.

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Today's college students aren't necessarily having more sex than previous generations, but the culture that permeates hookups on campus has changed. Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images

Hidden Brain

LISTEN: The Unspoken Rules Of Sex On College Campuses

Research suggests that college students are not having more sex than their parents were a generation ago. But on the latest episode of Hidden Brain, sociologist Lisa Wade says the culture around sex has changed dramatically.

Spring Lake Park High School junior Kia Muleta has been playing the clarinet since fifth grade. Kia wants more diversity in her band music. She is often the only black student in band, where most of the music was composed by white men. Evan Frost/MPR News hide caption

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Evan Frost/MPR News

NPR Ed

Why This High School Band Is Only Buying Music From Composers Of Color

Minnesota Public Radio

Often, high School band music is composed by white men. So this school is seeking out music from women and composers of color who are writing music, but aren't being published at the same rate.

Why This High School Band Is Only Buying Music From Composers Of Color

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A flag flies on a green lined with villas at the Trump International Golf Club in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The 18-hole golf course bearing Donald Trump's name exemplifies the questions surrounding his international business interests. Kamran Jebreili/AP hide caption

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Kamran Jebreili/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Trump's Sons Heading To Dubai As Business Interests Continue To Expand Overseas

The president's eldest sons will cut the ribbon on a new Trump golf course in Dubai this weekend. The Trump family stands to profit, while U.S. taxpayers pick up the tab for Secret Service protection.

Shailene Woodley, Reese Witherspoon and Nicole Kidman play Monterey moms — and possible murderers — in the HBO miniseries Big Little Lies. HBO hide caption

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HBO

Television

New Dramas 'Good Fight' And 'Big Little Lies' Make A Case For Subscription TV

Fresh Air

TV critic David Bianculli reviews two shows premiering this weekend: HBO's miniseries, Big Little Lies, and CBS's The Good Fight, which will be relocating to the network's subscription streaming site.

New Dramas 'Good Fight' And 'Big Little Lies' Make A Case For Subscription TV

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An early draft of Card III in Hermann Rorschach's psychological test. Archiv und Sammlung Hermann Rorschach, University Library of Bern hide caption

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Archiv und Sammlung Hermann Rorschach, University Library of Bern

Shots - Health News

How Hermann Rorschach's 'Inkblots' Took On A Life Of Their Own

These days, you're more likely to come across the concept of a Rorschach test in a cultural context than a clinical one. In a new book, author Damion Searls traces the history of the famous inkblots.

How Hermann Rorschach's 'Inkblots' Took On A Life Of Their Own

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Nahant, Mass., is a rocky crescent-moon-shape piece of land that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean just north of Boston. In the era of climate change, residents are trying to figure out how to adapt to rising sea levels. Lucian Perkins for WBEZ hide caption

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Lucian Perkins for WBEZ

Environment

In Massachusetts, Coastal Residents Consider How To Adapt To Climate Change

Living by the shore in the age of climate change means managing risk. In the community of Nahant, Mass., residents are trying to decide how to adapt.

In Massachusetts, Coastal Residents Consider How To Adapt To Climate Change

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Craig Britton once paid $18,000 a year in premiums for health insurance he bought through Minnesota's "high risk pool." He calls the argument that these pools can bring down the cost of monthly premiums "a lot of baloney." Mark Zdehchlik / MPR News hide caption

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Mark Zdehchlik / MPR News

Shots - Health News

GOP Leaders Urge Return To 'High-Risk Insurance Pools' That Critics Call Costly

Minnesota Public Radio

Some Republicans in Congress say they could partly fix the federal health law by again separating people who buy insurance into two categories — sick and healthy. Critics say it won't save money.

GOP Leaders Urge Return To 'High-Risk Insurance Pools' That Critics Call Costly

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People shop after returning to their homes in east Mosul in January. Ahmed Saad/Reuters hide caption

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Ahmed Saad/Reuters

Parallels - World News

Life Inches Back To Normal In East Mosul, But Worries Remain

As Iraqi and U.S. forces plan to attack ISIS on the western side of the city of Mosul, residents are trying to restart their lives in the freed eastern side of the city. Not everyone feels safe.

Life Inches Back To Normal In East Mosul, But Worries Remain

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On one Alaskan island, reindeer have eaten the lichen faster than it could regrow. They're now digging up roots and grazing on grass. Courtesy of Paul Melovidov hide caption

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Courtesy of Paul Melovidov

Animals

When Their Food Ran Out, These Reindeer Kept Digging

Alaska Public Media

Reindeer are thought to face a grim future as climate change threatens lichen, a key winter food source. But on one Alaskan island, reindeer have found a new food source, making scientists hopeful.

When Their Food Ran Out, These Reindeer Kept Digging

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