Charles Mayer, 30, of San Diego, survived an IED attack while serving in Iraq in 2010, but has suffered from complications including PTSD. Stuart Palley for NPR hide caption

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Shots - Health News

War Studies Suggest A Concussion Leaves The Brain Vulnerable To PTSD

Troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan are far more likely to develop post-traumatic stress disorder if they have suffered a concussion. The reason may be a change in the brain's fear circuits.

War Studies Suggest A Concussion Leaves The Brain Vulnerable To PTSD

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Demonstrators take a knee during the national anthem outside Bank of America Stadium before an NFL football game between the Charlotte Panthers and the Minnesota Vikings on Sunday in Charlotte, N.C. Protests have disrupted the city since Tuesday night, following the shooting of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott at an apartment complex in the city. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Curfew Lifted In Charlotte After Several Days Of Peaceful Protests

After two nights of violent unrest, a midnight curfew was imposed on Thursday night. As protests became peaceful, though, it was not always enforced, and authorities lifted it on Sunday.

In 1948, eight African-American men joined the Atlanta police force. They could not drive squad cars, step foot in police headquarters, or arrest white citizens. They are the inspiration for Thomas Mullen's new novel, Darktown. Kenan Research Center at the Atlanta History Center hide caption

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Author Interviews

'Darktown' Imagines What It Was Like For Atlanta's First Black Police Officers

In 1948, eight African-American men joined Atlanta's police force. Those pioneer officers — who couldn't drive squad cars or even step foot in headquarters — inspired Thomas Mullen's new novel.

The Zozobra, a 50-foot-tall, scowling, ghostly white marionette with flailing arms and a flowing muslin robe. Here it is, under construction. Mark Lennihan/Santa Fe New Mexican/Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives hide caption

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Arts & Life

Long Before Burning Man, Zozobra Brought Fire And Redemption To The Desert

For decades, residents in Santa Fe, N.M., have gathered to burn a massive puppet — but only after stuffing it with symbols of their woes. It's a way to release the past year's sadness and start anew.

Bob Topmiller, chief of toxicology at the Hamilton County Coroner's Office, holds a small vial containing carfentanil extracted from a sample of blood. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Deadly Opioid Overwhelms First Responders And Crime Labs in Ohio

Side Effects Public Media

Carfentanil, a potent variation on fentanyl, is being blamed for a wave of opioid overdoses. In Cincinnati, the coroner, crime lab and first responders are struggling to keep up.

Deadly Opioid Overwhelms First Responders And Crime Labs in Ohio

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"Because I grew up in such a strong Hispanic community, I carry that," Luz Elena Mendoza says. "I carry it whenever I go, so that's always strong." Christal Angélique/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music Interviews

Y La Bamba's Luz Elena Mendoza On Valuing One's Voice

Mendoza says she's often felt caught between cultures. But she's learned to embrace multiple identities simultaneously — and it shows in her music.

Y La Bamba's Luz Elena Mendoza On Valuing One's Voice

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Studs Terkel talks on his Chicago radio show in the late 1970s. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Interviews

'Working' Then And Now: Studs Terkel's Book Interviews Resurface As Audio

All this week on NPR, you'll hear the voices of people Studs Terkel interviewed in his book, Working. Among the interviews you'll hear this week are a telephone operator and hotel piano player.

'Working' Then And Now: Studs Terkel's Book Interviews Resurface As Audio

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