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A Syrian man carries a child injured in the government bombing of eastern Ghouta, on the outskirts of Damascus on Monday. Abdulmonam Eassa/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Abdulmonam Eassa/AFP/Getty Images

'No Words Will Do Justice': Onslaught On Syrian Suburb Kills Some 100 Civilians

The rebel-held enclave outside Damascus, one of the few left in Syria, has been bombarded by pro-regime forces recently — and UNICEF and other aid groups have struggled to describe the carnage.

Aleksandr Krushelnitckii of the Olympic Athletes from Russia team is now the subject of an official anti-doping investigation, the Court of Arbitration for Sport said on Monday. He's seen here delivering a stone against Norway in the curling mixed doubles bronze medal game at the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games — a match the team from Russia won. Jamie Squire/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Formal Doping Case Is Opened Against Russian Curler Who Won Medal In Pyeongchang

Aleksandr Krushelnitckii finished third in the mixed-doubles curling tournament, competing with his wife and teammate, Anastasia Bryzgalova. Now he's the subject of an investigation.

Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney climbs down from a tractor during a tour of Gibson's Green Acres Dairy Friday, Feb. 16, in Ogden, Utah. Romney hopes to win the seat being vacated by retiring seven-term Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Trump Endorses Romney For U.S. Senate, But Does It Signal Détente?

Pundits have speculated that the famously strained relationship between the president and the former presidential candidate could mean a future Sen. Romney would be a thorn in Trump's side.

Jenn Liv for NPR

The Father Of The Internet Sees His Invention Reflected Back Through A 'Black Mirror'

The titans of Silicon Valley have a grand vision of the future. But they have a tendency to miss the downside of their inventions — think cybercrime and online harassment.

The Father Of The Internet Sees His Invention Reflected Back Through A 'Black Mirror'

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Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro addresses a news conference at the Miraflores Presidential Palace in Caracas last week. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Maduro Calls Out President Trump On Twitter, Requesting 'Dialogue'

The U.S. has put sanctions on the Venezuelan president and labeled him a "dictator." Nicolas Maduro's tweet Monday came not long after he was uninvited from a summit of Western Hemisphere countries.

At the Munich Security Conference in Munich on Sunday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu holds a part of a downed drone that he said came from an Iranian drone shot down over Israeli airspace earlier this month. Lennart Preiss/AP hide caption

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Lennart Preiss/AP

At Munich Security Conference, Frayed Relations On Display As Global Crises Grow

Confrontation and ultimatums replaced compromise and consensus at the meeting, where North Korea and the Iran deal topped the agenda. A commentator described it as "the end of the road" for diplomacy.

Demonstrators participate in a "lie-in" during a protest in favor of gun control reform in front of the White House. Grassroots groups are planning hundreds more protests in coming weeks. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Teens 'Lie In' At White House To Push For Stronger Gun Control

In solidarity with their peers attacked in last week's school shooting in Florida, D.C. area students called for gun control reform Monday. Hundreds more demonstrations are expected in coming weeks.

Automating Inequality by Virginia Eubanks Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

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Eslah Attar/NPR

'Automating Inequality': Algorithms In Public Services Often Fail The Most Vulnerable

Author Virginia Eubanks argues that automated systems that governments across the U.S. use to deliver benefit and welfare programs are often rigged against the very people who need it most.

'Automating Inequality': Algorithms In Public Services Often Fail The Most Vulnerable

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Along this road are several businesses in Dalton, Ga., that cater to the town's large Hispanic population. As many as 4,000 DACA recipients live in Dalton, and many work in the carpet industry. Kevin D. Liles for NPR hide caption

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Kevin D. Liles for NPR

Why Employers In Georgia Are Watching The Immigration Debate Closely

In Dalton, Ga., the self-proclaimed "carpet capital of the world," business leaders are worried about what will happen if DACA protections disappear.

Why Employers In Georgia Are Watching The Immigration Debate Closely

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A microscope that clips to your phone's camera works in conjunction with a chemically-coated chip that binds to bacteria, even in tiny amounts. Karen Brown/New England Public Radio hide caption

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Karen Brown/New England Public Radio

Scientists Develop A Way To Use A Smartphone To Prevent Food Poisoning

New England Public Radio

A microscope that clips on to your phone's camera can detect bacteria, such as salmonella or E. coli, even in tiny amounts. But the technology can't yet distinguish between good and bad bacteria.

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