Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan, left, and opposition candidate Gen. Muhammadu Buhari, right, prepare to sign a renewal of their pledge to hold peaceful "free, fair, and credible" elections, at a hotel in the capital Abuja, Nigeria, on Thursday. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ben Curtis/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Amid Violence, Nigerians Go To The Polls To Choose A President

Incumbent Goodluck Jonathan faces off against former military dictator Muhammadu Buhari in what is being described as the closest contest in the history of the West African country.

Needle exchange programs, like this one in Portland, Maine, offer free, sterile syringes and needles to drug users. The programs save money and lives, health officials say, by curtailing the spread of bloodborne infections, such as hepatitis and HIV. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Shots - Health News

Indiana's HIV Spike Prompts New Calls For Needle Exchanges Statewide WFYI

Southeastern Indiana is battling an HIV outbreak. The new cases are mostly linked to injection drug use and have reignited a debate over needle exchanges, which are currently illegal in the state.

From member station

WFYI

Tiny Desk Concerts

Anonymous 4 With Bruce Molsky: Tiny Desk Concert

The a cappella quartet, known for luminous interpretations of medieval pieces, teams up with folk musician Bruce Molsky in music from more modern times — popular songs from the Civil War era.

Robert Duncan poses with his wife, Karen, for New York photographer Iké Udé. Iké Udé/Courtesy of Robert and Karen Duncan hide caption

itoggle caption Iké Udé/Courtesy of Robert and Karen Duncan

The Seams

Nigerian Artist Continues A Family Tradition With 'Sartorial Anarchy'

In Lagos, Iké Udé's family engaged in a West African tradition: photographing people wearing new clothes. Clothing and portraiture are still at the center of the New York-based photographer's whimsical work.

Daily traffic in Havana resembles a vintage car rally, even if does share the city streets these days Hyundais and Peugeots and rattletrap Russian Ladas. Eyder Peralta/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Eyder Peralta/NPR

The Two-Way - News Blog

For Decades, Vintage Cars Were All They Had. Now Cubans Are Profiting

The old cars that crowd Havana's streets used to symbolize a stagnant nation. Now enterprising Cubans have begun renting cars out to tourists who are hungry for the cars of their youth.

Russell Moore preaching during the first plenary address, "Black, And White And Red All Over: Why Racial Reconciliation Is A Gospel Issue." Alli Rader hide caption

itoggle caption Alli Rader

Code Switch

Southern Baptists Don't Shy Away From Talking About Their Racist Past

The denomination held a summit in Nashville, Tenn., this week to consider how the Gospel speaks to race relations. It wasn't easy, and moving from words to actions may be a challenge.

Melinda Townsend-Breslin holds a photo showing her and her late mother standing in the parking lot of a favorite thrift store in 2013. William DeShazer for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption William DeShazer for NPR

Shots - Health News

Medical Bills Linger, Long After Cancer Treatment Ends WNYC

A woman's family is stuck with medical charges for care she received after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Negotiating relief from the bills has become a part-time job for her daughter.

From member station

WNYC
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