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Residents seek shelter inside Roberto Clemente Coliseum in San Juan, Puerto Rico, early on Wednesday, as Hurricane Maria struck the island. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Reports Indicate Maria May Have Knocked Out Power To All Of Puerto Rico

The storm is the strongest hurricane to have hit the island in decades. The head of Puerto Rico's emergency management agency says it may have knocked out critical high-voltage power lines.

Antonio Santamaria (left), Emilia Rubalcaba, Veronica Segredo, Louis Perez, and Olivia Geller. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Miami Fourth-Graders Write About Their Experiences With Hurricanes

At Sunset Elementary, students are writing personal essays about their experience with Hurricane Irma, and they have some advice for other kids who have yet to live through such a storm.

Miami Fourth-Graders Write About Their Experiences With Hurricanes

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Seen from afar, the collapsed section of the Enrique Rebsamen school in Mexico City is surrounded by volunteers and rescue workers on Wednesday. A wing of the three-story building collapsed into a massive pancake of concrete slabs during Mexico's deadliest earthquake in years. Miguel Tovar/AP hide caption

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Miguel Tovar/AP

Hope, Despair Descend On Quake-Shattered School In Mexico City

The elementary school partly collapsed during Tuesday's earthquake, burying both students and teachers. In the aftermath, rescue workers and volunteers have struggled to save lives and preserve hope.

Former President Barack Obama speaks at Goalkeepers 2017, at Jazz at Lincoln Center Wednesday in New York City. Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

Obama Argues Against Dark Worldview, Defends Health Care Law

"We have to reject the notion that we are suddenly gripped by forces that we cannot control," the former president said Wednesday, speaking in New York City while his successor was at the U.N.

Obama Argues Against Dark Worldview, Defends Health Care Law

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Kathy Niakan, a developmental biologist at the Francis Crick Institute in London, used the CRISPR gene editing technique to find out how a gene affects the growth of human embryos. Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute

Editing Embryo DNA Yields Clues About Early Human Development

Researchers disabled a gene that they think helps determine which human embryos will develop normally. The technique they used is controversial because it could be used to change babies' DNA.

Former world middleweight champion boxer Jake LaMotta attends a dinner in New York City in 2012. LaMotta has died at 95. Jason Kempin/Getty Images for The Buoniconti Fund To Cure Paralysis hide caption

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Jason Kempin/Getty Images for The Buoniconti Fund To Cure Paralysis

Jake LaMotta, Boxer Of 'Raging Bull' Fame, Dies At 95

LaMotta, the middleweight champion whose story inspired Martin Scorsese and Robert De Niro, was famous for his fury both in and out of the ring. Later in life, he became a stand-up comedian.

In his new special, Jerry Seinfeld revisits the shop window where he first decided try stand-up and the comedy club where he became a regular in the summer of 1976. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

Jerry Seinfeld's New Netflix Special Puts His Comic Life Into Perspective

Fresh Air

After more than 40 years in the business, Seinfeld revisits the clubs where he got his start. Critic David Bianculli says Jerry Before Seinfeld will make you laugh — a lot.

Jerry Seinfeld's New Netflix Special Puts His Comic Life Into Perspective

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Actress Nadine Malouf makes kubah as she tells stories about Syria's civil war in Oh My Sweet Land. Pavel Antonov /Blake Zidell & Associates hide caption

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Pavel Antonov /Blake Zidell & Associates

In Kitchens Across New York, 'Oh My Sweet Land' Serves Up Stories Of Syria

The one-woman show centers on a Syrian-American who tells harrowing stories of Syria's civil war as she prepares a traditional dish. It's an intimate experience for both the audience and the actress.

In Kitchens Across New York, 'Oh My Sweet Land' Serves Up Stories Of Syria

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Smoke rises from buildings in the area of Bughayliyah, on the northern outskirts of Deir ez-Zor on Sept. 13, as Syrian forces advance during their ongoing battle against ISIS. George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images

Why The Race To Oust ISIS From Deir Ez-Zor In Syria May Present New Dangers

Syrian troops and allied militias are locked in a race against U.S.-backed rebels for control of an oil-rich province that will give whoever governs it greater influence in the country's civil war.

Dillard University students march to their polling place on campus to vote in New Orleans on Nov. 8, 2016. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc./Getty Images

2016 Voter Turnout Dropped At HBCUs, Climbed At Women's Colleges, Study Finds

Voter turnout was up among college students by more than the nation as a whole in the last election, a Tufts University report says. But that turnout varied greatly across different types of colleges.

A person holds up a ballot during a protest in front of the Economy headquarters of Catalonia's regional government in Barcelona on Wednesday, during street protests against raids by Spanish police. The region plans to hold a referendum on independence on Oct. 1, over the objections of Madrid. Pau Barrena/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pau Barrena/AFP/Getty Images

Spanish Police Detain Catalan Politicians Ahead Of Independence Vote

Spain considers the Catalonian referendum, set for Oct. 1, to be illegal. Police raided government offices and detained at least a dozen separatist leaders, prompting street protests.

Christina Ascani/NPR

Novel 'Forest Dark' And Dog Book 'Afterglow' Consider The Meaning Of Life

Fresh Air

Critic Maureen Corrigan reviews two books that use experimental forms to tackle weighty topics. "Both of these odd new books offer something special," she says.

Novel 'Forest Dark' And Dog Book 'Afterglow' Consider The Meaning Of Life

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Affordable Care Act navigators helped guide those looking for insurance during an enrollment event at San Antonio's Southwest General Hospital last year. Beyond helping with initial enrollment, navigators often follow-up with help later, as an applicant's income or job status changes. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Bemoaning Budget Cuts, Health Care Navigators Say Feds Don't Get It

Kaiser Health News

The federal government has sharply cut funding to groups that help people enroll in health plans. But the groups say federal officials don't understand how much help and follow-up some people need.

The team that won the Hult Prize poses with their trophy on September 16 at U.N. headquarters. From left: Gia Farooqi, Hanaa Lakhani, Moneeb Mian, and Hasan Usmani. They developed a ride-sharing rickshaw service for refugees in a Pakistan slum. Jason DeCrow/Hult Prize Foundation via AP Ima hide caption

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Jason DeCrow/Hult Prize Foundation via AP Ima

How 3 Rickshaws Won A Million-Dollar Prize

The members of the winning team, who met at Rutgers University, piloted a transportation service aimed at the refugees in the world's largest slum.

Sen. Luther Strange, R-Ala., campaigns at McCoy Outdoors in Mobile last weekend. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Who Can Really 'Drain The Swamp'? Alabama GOP Primary Race Pits Trump Against Bannon

Sen. Luther Strange hopes a visit Friday by President Trump can help him win next Tuesday's GOP runoff. But "Ten Commandments" Judge Roy Moore is trying to claim the true conservative mantle.

Who Can Really 'Drain The Swamp'? Alabama GOP Primary Race Pits Trump Against Bannon

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