NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts NPR delivers breaking national and world news. Also top stories from business, politics, health, science, technology, music, arts and culture. Subscribe to podcasts and RSS feeds.

Latest Newscast

Tosha Atibu and her husband Atibu Ty Ty stand their Houston home, which was flooded during Hurricane Harvey. They are racing to get it shape in time for the family to move back in for Christmas. Peter Breslow/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Breslow/NPR

In Post-Harvey Houston, Immigrants Struggle As The City Grapples With How To Help

An immigrant family from the Democratic Republic of the Congo lost everything in Hurricane Harvey. They hope to move back to their house in time for Christmas.

In Post-Harvey Houston, Immigrants Struggle As The City Grapples With How To Help

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569716760/569716761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Actor Terry Crews was recognized last week as part of "The Silence Breakers," the group of men and women collectively named Time magazine's Person of the Year. Crews says he was sexually assaulted in 2016 by a Hollywood talent agent. Jordan Strauss/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jordan Strauss/AP

Terry Crews On His Sexual Assault Lawsuit: This Is About Accountability

NPR's Michel Martin spoke with actor Terry Crews about sexual assault, how he joined the #MeToo movement and why he is fighting to hold people in Hollywood accountable.

Terry Crews On His Sexual Assault Lawsuit: This Is About Accountability

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569682236/569767191" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In "Gardens Speak," visitors lie in graves 10 at a time, listening to recorded stories of those killed in the Syrian uprising. Tania El Khoury/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Tania El Khoury/Courtesy of the artist

Stories Of Syria's Uprising, And Its Backyard Funerals, In 'Gardens Speak'

In Miami Beach, visitors were lying down in freshly-dug graves 10 at a time. It was part of Tania El Khoury's interactive artwork, which tells the tales of people killed in Syria's civil war.

Stories Of Syria's Uprising, And Its Backyard Funerals, In 'Gardens Speak'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569528600/569767173" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

China's ban means recycling is piling up at Rogue Waste System in southern Oregon. Employees Scott Fowler, Laura Leebrick and Garry Penning say their only option for now is to send it to a landfill. Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix hide caption

toggle caption
Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix

Recycling Chaos In U.S. As China Bans 'Foreign Waste'

Oregon Public Broadcasting

The U.S. ships a big chunk of its recycled goods to China. But China doesn't want them anymore, and that's leaving the recycling industry in turmoil.

A Father's Cruel Mission To Create 'The Only Girl In The World'

Maude Julien's new memoir chronicles her extraordinary — and awful — childhood with fanatical parents determined to turn her into the ultimate survivor through deprivation, violence and endless tests.

A Father's Cruel Mission To Create 'The Only Girl In The World'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569241086/569601060" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Protesters outside the federal courthouse where Michael Flynn pleaded guilty early this month speculate what is coming next in the special counsel probe. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

As Mueller's Russia Probe Forges Ahead, Potential Legal Endgames Begin to Take Shape

No one on the outside knows what cards Robert Mueller holds, but his actions offer some clues. Here's a look at some of the laws the special counsel might try to use in a potential prosecutions.

According to a new note on the Wall Street Journal's style book, much of its coverage painted millennials with a broad and sometimes insulting brush. Optician Training/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Optician Training/Flickr

'Millennials': Be Careful How We Use This Label

The Wall Street Journal announced that it would consider how it uses the term "millennial." Linguist Ben Zimmer weighs in on whether this term has painted a whole generation with too broad a brush.

'Millennials': Be Careful How We Use This Label

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569413425/569673652" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How To Not Spoil Your Kids This Christmas

Parents have the conflicting desires to give their kids everything they want but not leave them entitled and spoiled. Two experts gave some advice about how to manage this balancing act.

How To Not Spoil Your Kids This Christmas

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569484895/569673646" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"Big Jim" Folsom during a campaign event in 1946. He also would bring a bucket and mop to campaign events, vowing to clean up state government. The bucket was used to collect campaign donations. Courtesy of the Alabama Department of Archives and History hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the Alabama Department of Archives and History

Before Roy Moore, Alabama Grappled With 'Kissing Jim'

Troy Public Radio

Alabama's political history is littered with episodes mixing sex and power in unseemly ways. A former governor, "Big Jim" Folsom, claimed he had kissed "50,000 of the sweetest mouths in Dixie."

President Trump announced Wednesday that the U.S. views Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, a controversial move that complicates Middle East politics. Gali Tibbon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gali Tibbon/AFP/Getty Images

To Some Zionist Christians And Jews, The Bible Says Jerusalem Is Israel's Capital

According to some pro-Israeli Christians and Jews, God wants Jerusalem to be the capital of a Jewish state. That argument, however, is not universally accepted among those faith groups.

Genesis Blu calls herself a "raptivist" — a mix of rapper and activist. Tim Clyne/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Tim Clyne/Courtesy of the artist

A Conversation With Houston's 'Raptivist' Genesis Blu

Genesis Blu is both a psychotherapist who works with teenagers and a rapper. "I love them equally," she says.

A Conversation With Houston's 'Raptivist' Genesis Blu

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569477801/569716848" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Black-footed ferrets are the most endangered mammal in North America. Scientists in Montana are trying to save the ferrets by saving their main food source, prairie dogs. Kathryn Scott Osler/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kathryn Scott Osler/Denver Post via Getty Images

Biologists With Drones And Peanut Butter Pellets Are On A Mission To Help Ferrets

Yellowstone Public Radio

To increase populations of the endangered black-footed ferret, scientists aim to save prairie dogs, a main food source. The biologists use drones and medicated peanut butter-flavored pellets to do it.

Biologists With Drones And Peanut Butter Pellets Are On A Mission To Help Ferrets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569468428/569716854" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript