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Marina Muun for NPR
Marina Muun for NPR

Marina Muun for NPR

Marina Muun for NPR

True You

What happens when you discover a part of yourself that is so different from who you think you are? Do you hold on to your original self tightly? Do you explore this other self? Or do you just panic?

What happens when you discover a part of yourself that is so different from who you think you are? Do you hold on to your original self tightly? Do you explore this other self? We travel to England to meet an insect with a split personality. Then we talk to an internet famous cartoonist who's been hiding a part of himself for years, and a woman who records herself sleep talking, and is amazed at what she finds.

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Marina Muun for NPR

True You

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Previous Shows

Future Self

We all have a future self, a version of us that is better, more successful. It can inspire us to achieve our dreams, or mock us for everything we have failed to become.

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The Culture Inside

Is there a part of ourselves that we don't acknowledge, that we don't even have access to and that might make us ashamed if we encountered it?

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Reality

What happens when we can't agree on reality? This week, Invisibilia sets out to find how it is possible for two people to look at the same thing, but see two different realities.

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Emotions

It feels like emotions just come at us, and there is nothing we can do. But we might have it backwards. We look at an unusual legal case and examine a provocative new theory about emotions.

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