Afghanistan's Ambassador On The Future Of The War

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Then-deputy director of CENTCOM, U.S. Navy Vice Admiral Robert Harward, is pictured with Jordan's Prince Faisal and the Army's head of operations and training Major General Awni Adwan in a May 2012 photo. Harward is now under consideration to replace Michael Flynn as President Trump's national security adviser. Khalil Mazraawi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khalil Mazraawi /AFP/Getty Images

An American soldier scanned the retina of a man in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan in Dec. 2011. Russia cites the danger of ISIS in Nangarhar as its reason for backing the Taliban, the U.S. says. Sgt. Trey Harvey/U.S. Army hide caption

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Sgt. Trey Harvey/U.S. Army

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl at Fort Bragg, N.C. His defense team is arguing that he cannot get a fair trial after Donald Trump repeatedly called Bergdahl a traitor in public. Ted Richardson/AP hide caption

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Ted Richardson/AP

General Requests Thousands More Troops To Break Afghanistan 'Stalemate'

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Soldiers from the 36th Infantry Division deployed to Afghanistan to help train and advise that country's military. The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan says thousands more such troops are needed there. Maj. Randall Stillinger/U.S. Army hide caption

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Maj. Randall Stillinger/U.S. Army

The International Committee of Red Cross emblem hangs on the wall of a hospital in Afghanistan's Herat province. Aref Karimi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aref Karimi/AFP/Getty Images

An Afghan girl on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan, in October 2016. The U.N. mission in Afghanistan says the number of children killed or wounded increased 24 percent last year. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

A woman and her children carry containers of water on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan, on Monday. Avalanches have killed more than 100 people in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

Pictures of people who were incarcerated at Manzanar War Relocation Center are displayed alongside family tags at Manzanar National Historic Site near Independence, Calif., in 2015. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Marjan practices at the Afghanistan National Institute of Music in Kabul. Rachel Corner/De Beeldunie hide caption

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Rachel Corner/De Beeldunie

All-Female Orchestra From Afghanistan Is A Force For Change

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Bilal Askaryar's parents were engaged in Kabul in 1984. The family fled Afghanistan in 1990, when Askaryar was five, and they were granted asylum in the United States. Courtesy of Bilal Askaryar hide caption

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Courtesy of Bilal Askaryar

One of the 8,400 remaining U.S. troops in Afghanistan guards the bay of a CH-47 Chinook transport helicopter as it flies near Kabul. David Welna/NPR hide caption

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David Welna/NPR

After 8 Years Of Unbroken War, Obama Hands Over Conflicts To Trump

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After Years Of War, Trump Stands To Inherit Ongoing Conflicts

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VFW Recruits On College Campus To Bring Young Vets Into The Fold

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A soldier fires a Carl Gustav recoilless rifle system during weapons practice in Helmand province, Afghanistan. Heavy weapons like these generate a shock wave that may cause brain injuries. Sgt. Benjamin Tuck/CJSOTF-A/DVIDS hide caption

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Sgt. Benjamin Tuck/CJSOTF-A/DVIDS

Pentagon Shelves Blast Gauges Meant To Detect Battlefield Brain Injuries

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