Animals Animals

Cow On The Way To A SlaughterHouse Wreaks Havoc

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A Matabele ant treats the wounds of a mate whose limbs were bitten off during a fight with termite soldiers. Erik T. Frank/Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg hide caption

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Erik T. Frank/Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg

Beloved by thousands, Sue the Tyrannosaurus rex is moving from her home in the main exhibition hall of Chicago's Field Museum to her own private suite on the second floor. Courtesy of The Field Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of The Field Museum

Sue The T. Rex Is Making Big Moves With Her Big Bones

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Bradley Martin is seen here in 1993 inspecting confiscated rhino horns, elephant tusks and ivory objects at the Taipei Zoo, in his role as a United Nations special envoy on rhino conservation. Tao Chuan Yeh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tao Chuan Yeh/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Administration Reverses Policy On Protecting Migrating Birds

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Wayne Pacelle, former CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, at a 2015 news conference. Pacelle resigned Friday. Jonathan Bachman/AP Images for The Humane Society of the United States hide caption

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Jonathan Bachman/AP Images for The Humane Society of the United States

United: Peacock Doesn't Meet Emotional Support Animal Guidelines

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A female orca named Wikie swims with a calf in 2011 at Marineland in Antibes, France. Wikie was the central animal in a study, published Wednesday, about orcas' ability to imitate human speech. Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images

Ocellated turkeys stand out for their bright blue heads and iridescent feathers. They're still around the Yucatan today. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

What scientists believe to be our oldest ancestor, the single-celled organism named LUCA, likely lived in extreme conditions where magma met water — in a setting similar to this one from Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images hide caption

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Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images

A female gopher tortoise, about 20 years old, at the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center near Newton, Ga. Todd Stone/AP hide caption

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Todd Stone/AP

Business And Wildlife Groups Skip The Fight, Work Together To Save A Species

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A group of Yellowstone National Park bison are in a holding pen in March 2016. Park officials are now looking for 52 bison that made a run for it after someone cut a hole in their holding pen. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

Yellowstone Bison Release Launches Criminal Investigation

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Nigel Raine keeps a collection of wild bees in his laboratory at the University of Guelph, in Canada. Farmed honeybees can compete with wild bees for food, making it harder for wild species to survive. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Honeybees Help Farmers, But They Don't Help The Environment

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A new population of the rare red handfish, which gets around by "walking" slowly along the seafloor, has been found off Tasmania, Australia. Antonia Cooper hide caption

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Antonia Cooper