A model of a Karl Marx statue was briefly on display in central Trier earlier this month. City of Trier Press Office hide caption

toggle caption
City of Trier Press Office

German City Accepts Karl Marx Statue From China, But Not Everyone's Happy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520996034/520996035" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Models pose at the end of the Marc Jacobs Runway Show at Park Avenue Armory on February 16, 2017 in New York City. In the past, Jacobs has been criticized for culturally insensitive runway shows. This year marked a change. Peter White/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Peter White/Getty Images

Jennifer Lopez plays singer Selena Quintanilla Perez in the 1997 film Selena. Rico Torres/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rico Torres/AFP/Getty Images

20 Years Ago, Biopic Helped Give Pop Star Selena Life Beyond Her Tragic Death

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520986979/520996104" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pete Holmes stars as a devout Christian comic with an upbeat disposition in the HBO's Crashing. McCall B. Polay/HBO hide caption

toggle caption
McCall B. Polay/HBO

Comic Pete Holmes Draws On His Early Career And 'Churchy' Roots In 'Crashing'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520950326/520975897" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nowruz, the Persian New Year, is a celebration of the start of spring marked through large parts of the Middle East and Central Asia. Above, a Nowruz haftseen table, laden with seven items meant to symbolize rebirth or renewal. creativeelixir/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
creativeelixir/Getty Images/iStockphoto

'Ghosts' In The Arctic: How The Long-Lost Franklin Expedition Was Found

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520818684/520922528" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Robert Silvers, co-founder of The New York Review of Books, speaks at the 2006 National Book Awards. Silvers died Monday after a brief illness. He was 87. STUART RAMSON/AP hide caption

toggle caption
STUART RAMSON/AP