What's Next After NATO Allies' Largest Military Exercise Since The Cold War?

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A Chinese J-10 fighter jet, the same model that intercepted U.S. aircraft earlier this week over the East China Sea, takes off from a runway in mainland China in 2014. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

North Koreans enjoy beer and snacks last August during the Taedonggang Beer Festival in Pyongyang. The festival, the first of its kind in the country, was held as a promotional event for the locally brewed beer. Korean signs in the background read "Our country is the best." Dita Alangkara/AP hide caption

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Dita Alangkara/AP

After Otto Warmbier's Death, U.S. Plans To Ban Travel To North Korea

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The U.S. is planning to ban American citizens from traveling to North Korea, tourism companies say. Earlier this week, Korean People's Army soldiers walked past portraits of late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung (left) and Kim Jong Il at the Korean Revolutionary Museum in Pyongyang. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

Ram Nath Kovind (left) walked with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (right) and Bharatiya Janata Party senior leader L.K. Advani (center) on their way to file Kovind's nomination papers for the presidential elections in New Delhi on June 23. Kovind belongs to the lowest rank of Hinduism's hierarchy. Manish Swarup/AP hide caption

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Manish Swarup/AP

The North Korean website promises tourists a cornucopia of attractions, including beautiful hikes and even surfing trips. Unmentioned: the 16 Americans who have been detained by North Korea in the past decade, according to the U.S. State Department. National Tourism Administration, DPR Korea/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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National Tourism Administration, DPR Korea/Screenshot by NPR

In a photo provided Saturday by the Shenyang Municipal Information Office, Liu Xia, center, the widow of Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, holds a portrait of him during his funeral. She stands with Liu Hui, her younger brother (left) and Liu Xiaoxuan, the younger brother of her late husband, who is holding his cremated remains. AP hide caption

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AP

The daughter of Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, Maryam Nawaz Sharif, arrives before appearing in front of an anti-corruption commission in Islamabad on July 5. Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images

China's Censors Block Winnie The Pooh From Social Media

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How A Microsoft Font Could Take Down A Prime Minister Caught Up In A Scandal

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An image of Penicillium colonies. The white colony is a mutant similar to the mold found in Camembert cheese. The green ones are the wild form. Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe hide caption

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Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe

South Korean soldiers stand guard at the village of Panmunjom, on the border shared by South and North Korea, last week. On Monday, Seoul proposed opening new talks to defuse escalating tensions along the border. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Shopping Mall In Shanghai Solves Bored Husband Problem

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Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan waves to his supporters as he arrives to commemorate the one year anniversary of the July 15, 2016 failed coup attempt, in Istanbul, Saturday. Pool Photo/AP/AP hide caption

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Pool Photo/AP/AP