According to research from Harvard, between 10% and 40% of the kids who intend to go to college at the time of high school graduation don't actually show up in the fall. Education researchers call this phenomenon "summer melt," and it has long been a puzzling problem. S_e_P_p/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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S_e_P_p/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Crew members on one of the simulated Mars missions this spring included Pitchayapa Jingjit (from left), Becky Parker, Elijah Espinoza and Esteban Ramirez. Community college students and teachers in real life, the team members spent a week in the Utah desert, partly to experience the isolation and challenges of a real trip to Mars. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

To Prepare For Mars Settlement, Simulated Missions Explore Utah's Desert

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Eyes come in all sizes. These belong to a domestic cat (from left), an owl and an octopus. The Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin has 56,000 specimens in its collection — including 6,000 from more exotic species. From left: Andyworks, Ralf Hettler, vicmicallef/iStockPhoto hide caption

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From left: Andyworks, Ralf Hettler, vicmicallef/iStockPhoto

'One Of A Kind' Collection Of Animal Eyeballs Aids Research On Vision Problems

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Patrick McGovern, scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Project at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, delves into the early history of fermentation in his latest book. Courtesy of Alison Dunlap hide caption

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Courtesy of Alison Dunlap

From sports, to politics, to the stock market, we love to make (and hear) predictions. This week, Hidden Brain explores why the so-called experts are so often wrong, and how we can avoid the common pitfalls of telling the future. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

Carrie Poppy on the TEDxVienna stage. Philipp Schwarz/Philipp Schwarz hide caption

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Philipp Schwarz/Philipp Schwarz

Carrie Poppy: Can Science Reveal The Truth Behind Ghost Stories?

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Deborah Lipstadt on the TEDxSkoll stage. TEDxSkoll hide caption

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TEDxSkoll

Deborah Lipstadt: How Do You Stand Up To A Holocaust Denier?

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Jennifer Qian for NPR

Listen to the Invisibilia episode

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Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew /AFP/Getty Images
Angie Wang for NPR

The Roots Of Consciousness: We're Of 2 Minds

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Max Planck Institute paleoanthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin examines the new finds at Jebel Irhoud, in Morocco. The eye orbits of a crushed human skull more than 300,000 years old are visible just beyond his fingertip. Shannon McPherron/Nature hide caption

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Shannon McPherron/Nature

315,000-Year-Old Fossils From Morocco Could Be Earliest Recorded Homo Sapiens

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Eight different real faces were shown to a monkey. The images were then reconstructed using analyzing electrical activity from 205 neurons recorded while the monkey was viewing the faces. Courtesy of Doris Tsao/Cell Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Doris Tsao/Cell Press

Cracking The Code That Lets The Brain ID Any Face, Fast

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TEDMED

Larissa MacFarquhar: How Far Would You Go To Help Others?

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Peter Singer: How Can We Be More Effective Altruists?

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Marla Aufmuth/TED

Abigail Marsh: Are We Wired To Be Altruistic?

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TEDMED

Cheryl Steed: Can Altruism Be Learned?

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Modern psychology shows that we all have a little bit of Narcissus in us. Most of us like people who remind us of ourselves — whether that is someone else with the same name or the same birthday. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr

Cloud eggs: It's not just Instagrammers who find them pretty. Chefs of the 17th century whipped them up, too. Then, as now, they were meant to impress. Maria Godoy/NPR hide caption

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Maria Godoy/NPR

Cloud Eggs: The Latest Instagram Food Fad Is Actually Centuries Old

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