Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

The past few weeks have revitalized debates across the country about what role Confederate monuments play in commemorating U.S. history. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

What Our Monuments (Don't) Teach Us About Remembering The Past

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Code Switch is tackling your trickiest questions about race relations. amathers/iStock hide caption

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amathers/iStock

How To Talk Race With Your Family: Ask Code Switch

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White supremacists descended on Charlottesville, Va., to protest the pending removal of the statue of Robert E. Lee in the city's Emancipation Park. Julia Rendleman/AP hide caption

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Julia Rendleman/AP

'We're Not Them' — Condemning Charlottesville And Condoning White Resentment

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Neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other demonstrators encircle counterprotesters at the base of a statue of Thomas Jefferson on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Va., on Friday. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Hundreds of people gather for a vigil on the spot where 32-year-old Heather Heyer was killed when a car plowed into a crowd of people protesting against the white supremacist "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Va. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

White nationalist demonstrators walk into a park to protest the pending removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville, Va., this weekend. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Christina Chung for NPR

When 'Where Are You From?' Takes You Someplace Unexpected

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Here's Why The Census Started Counting Latinos, And How That Could Change In 2020

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While the number of Asian-American lawyers and law students increased greatly in recent decades, there are still few Asian-American lawyers in top positions in the legal field. Tawatdchai Muelae/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Tawatdchai Muelae/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Hip Hop deejays Stretch Armstrong (right) aka Adrian Bartos and Bobbito (left) aka Robert Garcia became legends on The Stretch Armstrong Show during the 1990s. Back then, they were hip hop tastemakers on college station WKCR in New York City. Now they're back together hosting "What's Good? With Stretch and Bobbito," an NPR podcast. Nickolai Hammar/NPR/. hide caption

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Nickolai Hammar/NPR/.

Stretch & Bobbito On Race, Hip-Hop, And Belonging

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