Protesters gather outside the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., Friday, June 16, 2017, after St. Anthony police officer Jeronimo Yanez was cleared in the fatal shooting of Philando Castile. Steve Karnowski/AP hide caption

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Steve Karnowski/AP

What To Make Of Philando Castile's Death, One Year Later

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Solána Rowe, aka SZA, released one of 2017's most anticipated albums on Friday. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Demonstrators hold up a Pan-African flag to protest the killing of teenager Michael Brown on Aug. 12, 2014 in Ferguson, Mo. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

On Flag Day, Remembering The Red, Black And Green

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Guess Who's Coming to Dinner arrived in theaters six months to the day after interracial marriage was legalized by the Loving v. Virginia Supreme Court decision in 1967. Above, Sidney Poitier, Katharine Houghton and Spencer Tracy. George Rinhart/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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George Rinhart/Corbis via Getty Images

50 Years After 'Loving,' Hollywood Still Struggles With Interracial Romance

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Bill Cosby walks outside the courtroom during a break on the third day of his sexual assault trial in the Montgomery County Courthouse June 7, 2017 in Norristown, Pa. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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"Racial impostor syndrome" is definitely a thing for many people. We hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

'Racial Impostor Syndrome': Here Are Your Stories

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American Muslim shop owner waits for customers as he sells different types of lanterns for sale as part of preparations for the Holy Month of Ramadan in Bayridge neighborhood in Brooklyn borough of New York, United States on May 24, 2017. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Elizabeth Taylor, (from left) George Segal, Richard Burton and Sandy Dennis starred in the 1966 film adaptation of Edward Albee's play, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? A theater director in Portland recently cast an African-American actor as Nick (Segal's role) — and found the Albee estate withheld rights to the play. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

Why A Theater Director Made A 'Color-Conscious Choice' In 'Virginia Woolf' Casting

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Gwendolyn Brooks poses with her first book of poems, A Street in Bronzeville. AP hide caption

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AP

Remembering The Great Poet Gwendolyn Brooks At 100

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