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Spectators watch the mixed doubles bronze medal curling match between Russian athletes and Norway at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, on Tuesday. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

'Videocracy' Looks At What Makes A Video Go Viral

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What Happens When You Fill A House With 'Smart' Technology

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John Perry Barlow spent much of his life advocating for and fighting to preserve the openness of the Internet. Have those who grew up with his teachings kept that spirit alive? Laguna Design/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM hide caption

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Laguna Design/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM
Ryan Johnson for NPR

Smartphone Detox: How To Power Down In A Wired World

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Lilli Carré for NPR

Listen: Tristan Harris, founder of Center for Humane Technology, on Morning Edition

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The advancement of AI-assisted face-swapping apps lets users apply the technology to an eerie new trend: pasting the faces of celebrities into pornographic videos. RobinOlimb/Getty Images hide caption

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RobinOlimb/Getty Images

In An Era Of Fake News, Advancing Face-Swap Apps Blur More Lines

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Mark Zuckerberg, CEO and founder of Facebook Inc., attends a conference in Idaho in July 2017. Zuckerberg has announced — and celebrated — a drop in the amount of time users are spending on Facebook. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A photo taken in 2013 shows women in traditional dress holding framed portraits of the late Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap as they line up to pay final respects to him at his residence in Hanoi. Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images

A diagram from an Amazon patent application shows a human worker (labeled with "14") wearing an ultrasonic bracelet tracking his or her hand movements and providing feedback. The patent was granted on Tuesday. Amazon/U.S. Patent and Trademark Office hide caption

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Amazon/U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
LA Johnson/NPR

What Kind of Screen Time Parent Are You? Take This Quiz And Find Out

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After facing an intense backlash over including footage of a dead body in Japan's "suicide forest," Logan Paul has published a new video to YouTube, about suicide prevention. Logan Paul via YouTube/ Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Logan Paul via YouTube/ Screenshot by NPR