40 year-old Longhua worker Wu Songtao and co-worker Wang Fuxiang stand at the bottom of their coal mine in Dalianhe. It's one of China's largest open-pit mines. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

As China's Coal Mines Close, Miners Are Becoming Bolder In Voicing Demands

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Demonstrators march in Washington, D.C., on Friday, calling on the Trump administration to meet with tribal leaders and opposing construction of the nearly complete Dakota Access Pipeline. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

The lights inside LEF Farms' new greenhouse have replaced starry skies with a jarring and unnatural glow. Courtesy of Dennis Jakubowski hide caption

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Courtesy of Dennis Jakubowski

Scott Pruitt's comments on carbon dioxide come just over two weeks after he took the helm of the Environmental Protection Agency, the agency with the authority to regulate CO2 and other greenhouse gases as pollutants. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Part of one of the world's biggest renewable energy systems, wind turbines dot the landscape on the edge of Sweetwater, Texas, along with a pump jack pulling up oil. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Wind Energy Takes Flight In The Heart Of Texas Oil Country

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Judith Ausah (left) and Evelyn Sewodey create solar panels at the Lady Volta Vocational Center for Electricity and Solar Power in Ghana. "At first, I thought it was man's work," says Ausah, whose 2-month-old daughter stays in the school nursery. "But I came here and saw that, yes, women can do it." Ginanne Brownell/For NPR hide caption

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Ginanne Brownell/For NPR

Steve Reed uses OhmConnect, a service that pays customers to lower their energy use at home during periods of high demand. Megan Wood/inewsource hide caption

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Megan Wood/inewsource

Energy Savings Can Be Fun, But No Need To Turn Off All The Lights

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Dakota Access Demonstrators Inspire New Pipeline Protests

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Rick Perry Looks To Bring Texas Approach To Energy Department

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The Navajo Generating Station located on the Navajo Indian Reservation, near Page, Ariz. Amber Brown/Courtesy of Salt River Project hide caption

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Amber Brown/Courtesy of Salt River Project

Navajo Workers At Coal-Fired Power Plant Brace For Its Closing

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A refinery in Anacortes, Wash. In 2016, voters in Washington state rejected an initiative that would have taxed carbon emissions from fossil fuels such as coal and gasoline. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Some environmental justice advocates say California's cap-and-trade program hasn't done anything to clean up the air in low-income communities like Wilmington, where refineries are located near residential neighborhoods. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

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Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Environmental Groups Say California's Climate Program Has Not Helped Them

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(Top) Police make arrests as they move through the Oceti Sakowin camp. (Bottom) The police moved steadily and slowly through the camp, accompanied by Humvees and maintaining a perimeter of the cleared area. Angus Mordant for NPR hide caption

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Angus Mordant for NPR

Military veterans protesting the pipeline stand opposite police guarding a bridge at the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Dec. 1, 2016. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Ashley Funk plans to move back home to southwest Pennsylvania to work on environmental projects in a place where climate change and the local economy are intertwined. Stephanie Strasburg for WBEZ hide caption

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Stephanie Strasburg for WBEZ

A Daughter Of Coal Country Battles Climate Change — And Her Father's Doubt

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Wind turbines and farm equipment now dot Horace Pritchard's land, where he raises corn, soybeans, and other crops. He also receives payments for hosting nine of the more than 100 wind turbines now operating near Elizabeth City, N.C. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

The South Has Been Slow To Harness Its Wind, But That's Changing

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Kansas City Power & Light (KCP&L) is building 1,000 charging stations and helping to turn a Midwestern metropolitan area into one of the fastest-growing electric vehicle markets in the country. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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In America's Heartland, A Power Company Leads Charge For Electric Cars

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