Michael Bloomberg And Carl Pope On 'Climate Of Hope'

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In "The Fish on My Plate," author and fisherman Paul Greenberg sets out to answer the question "what fish should I eat that's good for me and good for the planet?" As part of his quest to investigate the health of the ocean — and his own — Greenberg spent a year eating seafood at breakfast, lunch and dinner. Courtesy of FRONTLINE hide caption

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Courtesy of FRONTLINE

K.K. DuVivier stands by a smart meter that sends electricity back to her utility, Xcel Energy. The Denver home gets credits from Xcel for power that's added back to the grid. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

As Rooftop Solar Challenges Utilities, One Aims For A Compromise

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Hacking Lake Erie: Tech Competition Seeks Solutions To Water-Related Problems

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Reinford Farms has 700 dairy cows. As you can imagine, they produce a lot of ... um... material to be converted into electricity. Dani Fresh for WHYY hide caption

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Dani Fresh for WHYY

Cattle owned by Fulani herdsmen graze in a field outside Kaduna, northwest Nigeria in February 2017. Stefan Heunis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Heunis/AFP/Getty Images

Clashes Over Grazing Land In Nigeria Threaten Nomadic Herding

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Out Of The Lab And Into The Streets, Science Community Marches For Science

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Bill Nye the Science Guy arrives to lead scientists and supporters down Constitution Avenue during the March for Science on Saturday in Washington, D.C. The event is being described as a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

In A New 'Anti-Science' Era, Bill Nye 'Saves The World' With Same Optimism

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The "talking piece" is held by whoever has the floor at the moment to share their feelings on climate change with the Good Grief group. Judy Fahys/KUER hide caption

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Judy Fahys/KUER

First Step To 'Eco-Grieving' Over Climate Change? Admit There's A Problem

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March For Science Organizers Work To Maintain Non-Partisan Position

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You may be tempted to save a piece of a moldy loaf by discarding the fuzzy bits. But food safety experts say molds penetrate deeper into the food than what's visible to us. And eating moldy food comes with health risks. Alex Reynolds/NPR hide caption

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

Matt Damon at the World Bank in Washington. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Matt Damon And Gary White On The World's Water Crisis

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When It Comes To Policymaking, The Rules Don't Apply To Climate Change

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A boy fishes on a bayou near Isle de Jean Charles, La., in August 2015. Louisiana is still losing about a football field of coastline every hour. Lee Celano/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lee Celano/AFP/Getty Images

An American black bear (they are often brown) is seen in Yosemite National Park. Rangers hope tracking the bears' locations will help prevent the animals from being hit by cars. Yosemite National Park via AP hide caption

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Yosemite National Park via AP

Yosemite Rangers Use Technology To Save Bears From Cars

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An iceberg looms large off the coast of Newfoundland on Sunday. Charlie Dunne hide caption

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Charlie Dunne

Massive Iceberg Makes A Stop Off Newfoundland Coast

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