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Liz Moreno thought she was done paying for her back surgery in 2015. But a $17,850 bill for a urine test showed up nine months later. Her father, Paul Davis, a retired doctor from Ohio, settled with the lab company for $5,000 in order to protect his daughter's credit history. Julia Robinson for KHN hide caption

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Julia Robinson for KHN

How A Urine Test After Back Surgery Triggered A $17,850 Bill

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Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar faced questions Wednesday from the House Ways and Means Committee about Idaho's move. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Several Planned Parenthood chapters and other groups involved in prevention of teen pregnancy are suing the administration for halting funding for their programs. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Administration Sued Over Ending Funding Of Teen Pregnancy Programs

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A young man uses heroin under a bridge in the Kensington section of Philadelphia, a neighborhood that has become a hub for heroin use. The economic costs of the epidemic are mounting, researchers say, as the U.S. loses more and more workers in their prime. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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A single company, Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, funneled $4.7 million to advocacy groups over the five-year period, according to the report. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

OxyContin Manufacturer Says It Will Stop Promoting Opioid Painkiller To Doctors

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The new hospital garment ties in the front, like a robe, allowing the patient more modesty than the standard gown. Sophie Sahara Barkham/courtesy Care+Wear hide caption

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Sophie Sahara Barkham/courtesy Care+Wear

Can A Patient Gown Makeover Move Hospitals To Embrace Change?

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What The Budget Deal Means For Medicare Drug Prices

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"This bill represents a significant bipartisan step forward," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Wednesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Study Finds 179,000 Nursing Home Residents Needlessly Being Given Antipsychotic Drugs

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On Jan. 10, President Trump signed into law the bipartisan Interdict Act, to give federal agents more tools to curtail opioid trafficking. But, after declaring the opioid crisis a public health emergency last fall, Trump has been slow to request money for treatment, critics note. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Says He Will Focus On Opioid Law Enforcement, Not Treatment

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The state of Alabama is suing Purdue Pharma LP, the maker of OxyContin, for allegedly fueling the opioid crisis by deceiving doctors about prescription painkillers. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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David Zatezalo, the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health, was asked about the advanced black lung epidemic at a congressional hearing in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 6, 2018. Jingnan Huo/NPR hide caption

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Jingnan Huo/NPR

Black Lung Study Finds Biggest Cluster Ever Of Fatal Coal Miners' Disease

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When President Trump decided to stop making the cost-sharing reduction payments to health insurers, New York and Minnesota lost significant funding to a health program that covers more than 800,000 low-income residents. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Patients seeking cancer treatment in the U.S. Virgin Islands must now go to the mainland. The Charlotte Kimelman Cancer Institute at Schneider Regional Medical Center on St. Thomas remains closed because of extensive damage to areas like the CAT scan suite. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

In The U.S. Virgin Islands, Health Care Remains In A Critical State

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