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Smallpox virus, colorized and magnified in this micrograph 42,000 times, is the real concern for biologists working on a cousin virus — horsepox. They're hoping to develop a better vaccine against smallpox, should that human scourge ever be used as a bioweapon. Chris Bjornberg/Science Source hide caption

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Chris Bjornberg/Science Source

Did Pox Virus Research Put Potential Profits Ahead of Public Safety?

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Next month in the U.K., anyone at a major grocery store looking to buy a soft drink with more than 150 mg of caffeine per liter will need to present an ID. Stephane Grangier/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephane Grangier/Getty Images

Urine testing to diagnose illness or to detect the presence of drugs is generally routine. But a woman who gave her doctor a urine sample months after back surgery got socked with a huge bill. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Intervening Early To Stop Killers

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Liz Moreno thought she was done paying for her back surgery in 2015. But a $17,850 bill for a urine test showed up nine months later. Her father, Paul Davis, a retired doctor from Ohio, settled with the lab company for $5,000 in order to protect his daughter's credit history. Julia Robinson for KHN hide caption

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Julia Robinson for KHN

How A Urine Test After Back Surgery Triggered A $17,850 Bill

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Influenza covers its shell with two types of accessories: the H spike, blue, and the N spike, red. Here the flu particle is sliced open to show its genetic material. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases hide caption

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

Simone Groper got her flu shot in January at a Walgreens pharmacy in San Francisco. Flu season will likely last a few more weeks, health officials say, and immunization can still minimize your chances of getting seriously sick. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar faced questions Wednesday from the House Ways and Means Committee about Idaho's move. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Several Planned Parenthood chapters and other groups involved in prevention of teen pregnancy are suing the administration for halting funding for their programs. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Trump Administration Sued Over Ending Funding Of Teen Pregnancy Programs

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A Happy Meal and McFlurry are arranged for a photograph at a McDonald's Corp. fast food restaurant in Phoenix, Ariz. The company says in the next four years, 50 percent or more of its kids meals will meet new nutrition criteria, with 600 or fewer calories per meal and caps on calories from sugar and saturated fat. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images