Health Health

Some YouTube stars seek counseling and take breaks from online life to deal with symptoms of anxiety. Eva Bee/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Bee/Ikon Images/Getty Images

YouTube Stars Stress Out, Just Like The Rest Of Us

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In the U.S., the average age for initiating sexual activity has remained around 17 or 18 since the early 1990s, even as people have begun marrying later in life. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images hide caption

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Across the state of Maine, the number of prescriptions for painkillers is dropping. But some patients who have chronic pain say they need high doses of the medication to be able to function. Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption

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Intent On Reversing Its Opioid Epidemic, A State Limits Prescriptions

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Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, D, center, recently signed a bill into law that would require insurers in the state to cover reproductive health services. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

A California jury awarded a woman $417 million in a case against Johnson & Johnson. The woman claimed that her use of Johnson's Baby Powder led to terminal ovarian cancer. Scientists disagree on how strong a link there is between talc and ovarian cancer. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Does Baby Powder Cause Cancer? A Jury Says Yes. Scientists Aren't So Sure

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Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (left) and Ohio Gov. John Kasich will present a plan that fleshes out a set of principles they wrote about in an op-ed in The Washington Post. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

About 50 percent of patients don't take their medicine as prescribed, research shows. And those mistakes are thought to result in at least 100,000 preventable deaths each year. amphotora/Getty Images hide caption

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'Smart' Pill Bottles Aren't Always Enough To Help The Medicine Go Down

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Hospital emergency departments are tasked with saving the lives of people who overdose on opioids. Clinicians and researchers hope that more can be done during the hospital encounter to connect people with treatment. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

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FangXiaNuo/Getty Images

Activists celebrate outside the Constitutional Court in Santiago, Chile, on Monday. The court approved a measure to ease the country's strict abortion ban by decriminalizing the procedure in certain cases. Claudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Claudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images

New nursing home residents are frequently handed an agreement to go to arbitration instead of suing if something goes wrong. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

Under Trump Rule, Nursing Home Residents May Not Be Able To Sue After Abuse

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Rosendo Gil, a family support worker with the Imperial County, Calif., home visiting program, has visited Blas Lopez and his fiancée Lluvia Padilla dozens of times since their daughter was born three years ago. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Lillie Pete sifts the juniper ash before adding it to her blue corn mush. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

To Get Calcium, Navajos Burn Juniper Branches To Eat The Ash

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