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Marie McCausland holds her newborn shortly after delivery. A ProPublica/NPR story about preeclampsia prompted her to seek emergency treatment when she developed symptoms days after giving birth. Courtesy of Marie McCausland hide caption

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Courtesy of Marie McCausland

A man walks into the building of the Internal Revenue Service, which oversees the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Program, in Washington, D.C., on March 10, 2016. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

The $25 million Labre Place in Miami was built using the low-income housing tax credit program. It's named for the patron saint for the homeless and is now home to 90 low-income residents, about half of whom were once homeless. Screenshot courtesy of Frontline (PBS) hide caption

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Screenshot courtesy of Frontline (PBS)

Affordable Housing Program Costs More, Shelters Fewer

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Farryn Giles and her son Isaiah, 6, walk in their east Dallas neighborhood. While she received a Section 8 voucher to help them move to a neighborhood with more opportunities, finding an apartment that would take the voucher was challenging. Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR hide caption

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Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Section 8 Vouchers Help The Poor — But Only If Housing Is Available

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An aerial view of the Lewisburg prison complex in Pennsylvania. Google Earth hide caption

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Google Earth

Lawsuit Says Lewisburg Prison Counsels Prisoners With Crossword Puzzles

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A display case at NIOSH shows a normal lung and a diseased black lung, caused by inhaling coal dust and other harmful particles while coal mining. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Howard Berkes/NPR

Branham wears reflective mining pants in his home in Elkhorn City, Ky. Branham has advanced stage black lung and was forced to quit mining earlier this year. Benny Becker/Ohio Valley ReSource hide caption

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Benny Becker/Ohio Valley ReSource

Advanced Black Lung Cases Surge In Appalachia

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Mansoor al-Dayfi sits in his apartment in Serbia. He was resettled there after serving 14 years in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Screenshot courtesy of Frontline (PBS) hide caption

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Screenshot courtesy of Frontline (PBS)

'Out Of Gitmo': Released Guantanamo Detainee Struggles In His New Home

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Ed Howard, an attorney specializing in consumer issues, and his sister had trouble obtaining price information while trying to plan their father's funeral. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Despite Decades-Old Law, Funeral Prices Are Still Unclear

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Ellen Bethea and her great-grandson, Lucas, look at a painting of her late husband, Archie. Laura Heald for NPR hide caption

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Laura Heald for NPR

You Could Pay Thousands Less For A Funeral Just By Crossing The Street

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The sun illuminates a row of homes at Park Plaza Cooperative in Fridley, Minn. Five years ago, the residents formed a nonprofit co-op and bought their entire neighborhood from the company that owned it. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

When Residents Take Ownership, A Mobile Home Community Thrives

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Dawn Tachell looks at the trash and debris that have collected in her community. Conditions in the neighborhood have become so bad that some people have abandoned their houses and moved out. Jed Conklin for NPR hide caption

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Jed Conklin for NPR

Mobile Home Park Owners Can Spoil An Affordable American Dream

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The Pentagon building complex is seen from Air Force One on June 29. An Army review concludes that commanders did nothing wrong when they kicked out more than 22,000 soldiers for misconduct after they came back from Iraq or Afghanistan – even though all of those troops had been diagnosed with mental health problems or brain injuries. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Senators, Military Specialists Say Army Report On Dismissed Soldiers Is Troubling

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Bill Minick, the president of PartnerSource, a Texas company that writes and administers opt-out plans, vowed that despite the Oklahoma Supreme Court decision, he would continue efforts to promote alternative plans in other states. Dylan Hollingsworth for ProPublica hide caption

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Dylan Hollingsworth for ProPublica

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health sent a mobile testing unit to a fire station in Wharton, W.Va., in 2012 to screen coal miners for black lung disease. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Howard Berkes/NPR

The Special Management Unit at Lewisburg prison, which was created in 2009 for "dangerously violent, confrontational, defiant, antagonistic inmates," has received many complaints about its use of restraints on inmates. Angie Wang for NPR hide caption

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Angie Wang for NPR

Inside Lewisburg Prison: A Choice Between A Violent Cellmate Or Shackles

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West Virginia billionaire businessman Jim Justice announced his run for governor of West Virginia as a Democrat in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., on May 11, 2015. Chris Tilley/AP hide caption

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Chris Tilley/AP

Haitians outside a Red Cross field hospital in Carrefour, Haiti, on Dec. 14, 2010, 11 months after a magnitude 7.0 earthquake hit the country's capital, Port-au-Prince. Thony Belizaire/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Thony Belizaire/AFP/Getty Images

Report: Red Cross Spent 25 Percent Of Haiti Donations On Internal Expenses

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Davontae Sanford stands with his mother, Taminko Sanford, during a news conference a day after he was released from prison. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Court Fines And Fees Almost Delay Homecoming For Wrongly Convicted Michigan Man

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