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At the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, NPR's Nina Totenberg talks to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. On stage with them is Robert Redford, founder of the festival. John Nowak / CNN Films hide caption

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John Nowak / CNN Films

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Reflects On The #MeToo Movement: 'It's About Time'

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Jenn Liv for NPR

Personalized Diets: Can Your Genes Really Tell You What To Eat?

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As mother and daughter, Carmen and Gisele Grayson thought their DNA ancestry tests would be very similar. Boy were they surprised. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

My Grandmother Was Italian. Why Aren't My Genes Italian?

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Diane Askwyth leads cheers as protestors make their way to Sam Boyd Stadium for the Women's March "Power to the Polls" voter registration tour launch on January 21, 2018, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sam Morris/Getty Images hide caption

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Shafika Khatun, 30, lives in what's known as the "widows' village" of the Hakimpara camp for Rohingya refugees in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. There are no men in the cluster of 34 shelters. Most of the women's husbands were killed in the recent violence. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

Rohingya Refugees Deeply Skeptical About Repatriation Plan

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Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks during a news conference on Saturday, arguing that the shutdown is mainly President Trump's fault. Republicans say Democrats manufactured the crisis over immigration. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Glenn Simpson, former Wall Street Journal journalist and co-founder of the research firm Fusion GPS, during his arrival for a scheduled appearance before a closed House Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on Nov. 14, 2017. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Rep. Patrick Meehan R-Pa., speaks during a news conference in 2012. A report Saturday said he used taxpayer money to settle a harassment complaint. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Then-presidential candidate Donald Trump (C) and his family prepare to cut the ribbon at the new Trump International Hotel on October 26, 2016, in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

After A Year In Office, Trump Still Facing Constitutional Challenges Over Businesses

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Kate Murphy felt frustrated by a lack of advice from doctors on how to use medical marijuana to mitigate side effects from her cancer treatment. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Doctors in Miami found that a man's tattoo expressing his end-of-life wishes was more confusing than helpful. Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine

When A Tattoo Means Life Or Death. Literally

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If conservatives were once hesitant about then-candidate Donald Trump, they're now enthusiastic about the direction he is taking the nation's corps of federal judges. Mike Kline/Getty Images hide caption

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One Year In, Trump Has Kept A Major Promise: Reshaping The Federal Judiciary

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Organizers of the marches, such as the rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., were hoping to avoid some of the pitfalls from last year's event. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP