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Doctors think the chronic pain of "shoulder impingement" may arise from age-related tendon and muscle degeneration, or from a bone spur that can rub against a tendon. Michele Constantini/Getty Images/PhotoAlto hide caption

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Michele Constantini/Getty Images/PhotoAlto

The core of the RBT-3 reactor at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors in Dimitrovgrad, Russia. Some scientists suspect the institute's work on medical isotopes might explain radioactivity detected over Europe. Sovfoto/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Sovfoto/UIG via Getty Images

Clues In That Mysterious Radioactive Cloud Point Toward Russia

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A farmer plows his field with an ox-pulled plow in China's Guangxi province. Archaeologists think that domesticated farm animals increased inequality in some ancient societies. Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images

From Cattle To Capital: How Agriculture Bred Ancient Inequality

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The study drew on survey data from half a million U.S. teenagers from 2010 to 2015. martin-dm/Getty Images hide caption

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martin-dm/Getty Images

Increased Hours Online Correlate With An Uptick In Teen Depression, Suicidal Thoughts

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Researchers Explore The Effects Of Section 8 Grants In Houston

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A neolithic jar from Khramis Didi-Gora, Georgia. The country has long prided itself on its winemaking tradition. A new analysis of ancient Georgian jars confirms that tradition goes back 8,000 years. Courtesy of the Georgian National Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of the Georgian National Museum

Georgian Jars Hold 8,000-Year-Old Winemaking Clues

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Brain Scientists Look Beyond Opioids To Conquer Pain

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In D.C., Brain Science Meets Behavioral Science To Shed Light On Mental Disorders

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iPTF14hls: The Star That Won't Die

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Kim Ryu for NPR

Scientists Start To Tease Out The Subtler Ways Racism Hurts Health

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Researchers grew sheets of genetically altered skin cells in the lab and used them to treat a boy with life-threatening epidermolysis bullosa. CMR Unimore/Nature hide caption

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CMR Unimore/Nature

Genetically Altered Skin Saves A Boy Dying Of A Rare Disease

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Pavlovian Conditioning And Marriage

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Patients with Type-1 diabetes don't have enough healthy islets of Langerhans cells — hormone-secreting cells of the pancreas. Granules inside these cells release insulin and other substances into the blood. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

A Quest: Insulin-Releasing Implant For Type-1 Diabetes

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Sleepless Night Leaves Some Brain Cells As Sluggish As You Feel

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Hurricane Harvey delivered record rainfall to East Texas. Many scientists believe that climate change helped to make the storm wetter. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Massive Government Report Says Climate Is Warming And Humans Are The Cause

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Monsoon rains flooded Mumbai in August 2017. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes can spread diseases like dengue fever. Drought has affected the health of Somalians. (From left) Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images; Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images; Arif Hudaverdi Yaman/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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(From left) Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images; Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images; Arif Hudaverdi Yaman/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

How Climate Change Is Already Affecting Health, Spreading Disease

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Brain Patterns May Predict People At Risk Of Suicide

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Shankar Vedantam, NPR's social science correspondent and host of the Hidden Brain podcast, explains why some of us are really good at recognizing faces and others are not. John Lamb/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamb/Getty Images

We're Not As Good At Remembering Faces As We Think We Are

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