Scientists placed two clusters of cultured forebrain cells side by side (each cluster the size of a head of a pin). Within days, the "minibrains" had fused and particular neurons (in green) migrated from the left side to the right side, as subsets of cells do in a real brain. Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University

Doctors have known for a long time that alcohol consumption can cause heart problems. Researchers in Germany used the Oktoberfest beer festival to link binge drinking to abnormal heart rhythms. Dan Herrick/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Herrick/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images

The larvae of Galleria mellonella, commonly known as a wax worm, is able to biodegrade plastic bags. Wayne Boo/USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab hide caption

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Wayne Boo/USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

The Lowly Wax Worm May Hold The Key To Biodegrading Plastic

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Rate Of Suicide Among Female Veterans Climbs, VA Says

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Out Of The Lab And Into The Streets, Science Community Marches For Science

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Can Placebos Work If You Know They're Placebos?

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Say what you will about naked mole-rats, but their bodies have a trick that lets them survive periods of oxygen deprivation. Roland Gockel/Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine hide caption

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Roland Gockel/Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine

Researchers Find Yet Another Reason Why Naked Mole-Rats Are Just Weird

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Small pulses of electricity to the brain have an effect on memory, new research shows. Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images

Electrical Stimulation To Boost Memory: Maybe It's All In The Timing

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Researchers found that a protein in human umbilical cord blood plasma improved learning and memory in older mice, but there's no indication it would work in people. Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images

Human Umbilical Cord Blood Helps Aging Mice Remember, Study Finds

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In two recent clinical trials of Harvoni and Sovaldi in the treatment of young people between the ages of 12 and 17, the drugs eliminated all traces of the hepatitis C virus in 97 to 100 percent of patients, generally in 12 weeks. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Researchers Examine The Psychology Of Protest Movements

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Hannah Berkowitz in her parents' home in West Hartford, Conn. Getting intensive in-home drug treatment is what ultimately helped her get back on track, she and her mom agree. Jack Rodolico/NHPR hide caption

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Jack Rodolico/NHPR

Home-Based Drug Treatment Program Costs Less And Works

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The laces on the left are tied in a strong knot that lies horizontally. The laces on the right are tied in a knot that makes the bow lie vertically and which, according to new research, can come untied more easily. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Untangling The Mystery Of Why Shoelaces Come Untied

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Spider Scientists Find 50 New Species

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Stories of outright misconduct are rare in science. But the pressures on researchers manifest in many more subtle ways, say social scientists studying the problem. Eva Bee/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Bee/Getty Images

How A Budget Squeeze Can Lead To Sloppy Science And Even Cheating

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New NASA evidence suggests that there's a chemical reaction taking place under the moon's icy surface that could provide conditions for life. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Young European eels (Anguilla anguilla) are called "glass eels" at that stage because they're transparent except for a dark spine down the middle. Philippe Garguil/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Garguil/Science Source

Eels May Use 'Magnetic Maps' As They Slither Across The Ocean

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Lisa, a client at the AAC Needle Exchange and Overdose Prevention Program in Cambridge, Mass. Nearly five years after an opioid overdose she still limps — possibly because of damage the drug cocktail did to her nerves or muscles. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

What Doesn't Kill You Can Maim: Unexpected Injuries From Opioids

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This wounded ant (Megaponera analis), with two termites clinging to it, is alive but likely too exhausted after battle to get back to the nest without help. Frank et al./Science Advances hide caption

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Frank et al./Science Advances

No Ant Left Behind: Warrior Ants Carry Injured Comrades Home

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