Why We Should Be Wary Of Moon Tourism

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During a media preview on July 13, Cassandra Hatton of Sotheby's displays the Apollo 11 contingency lunar sample return bag. It was used by Neil Armstrong on Apollo 11 to bring back the first pieces of the moon ever collected. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Quantum satellite "Micius" flies past the quantum teleportation experiment platform in Tibet. Chinese scientists have announced they successfully "teleported" information on a photon from Earth to space, spanning a distance of more than 300 miles. Jin Liwang/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Jin Liwang/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Beam Me Up, Scotty ... Sort Of. Chinese Scientists 'Teleport' Photon To Space

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Artist's impression of Jupiter's Great Red Spot heating the upper atmosphere. Karen Teramura with James O'Donoghue and Luke Moore/NASA hide caption

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Karen Teramura with James O'Donoghue and Luke Moore/NASA

NASA Spacecraft Gets Up Close With Jupiter's Great Red Spot

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Crew members on one of the simulated Mars missions this spring included Pitchayapa Jingjit (from left), Becky Parker, Elijah Espinoza and Esteban Ramirez. Community college students and teachers in real life, the team members spent a week in the Utah desert, partly to experience the isolation and challenges of a real trip to Mars. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

To Prepare For Mars Settlement, Simulated Missions Explore Utah's Desert

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A composite self-portrait of the Mars Pathfinder. NASA/JPL hide caption

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NASA/JPL

Another July 4th Anniversary: Pathfinder's Landing On Mars

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The Apollo 11 capsule in in sore need of restoration, conservation specialists say, if it's to last another 50 years. Even the adhesive that helps holds stuff in place is losing its stickiness, and some objects inside are starting to pop off. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

Moonwalkers' Apollo 11 Capsule Gets Needed Primping For Its Star Turn On Earth

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Congressman Proposes A Military 'Space Corps'

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Inside Mars Simulator, IKEA Designers Learn How To Live In Close Quarters

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NASA's 2017 astronaut candidates round up for a group photo on Tuesday at Ellington Field near Johnson Space Center. The 12 pictured are, front row, left to right, Zena Cardman, Jasmin Moghbeli, Robb Kulin, Jessica Watkins, Loral O'Hara; back row, left to right, Jonny Kim, Frank Rubio, Matthew Dominick, Warren Hoburg, Kayla Barron, Bob Hines and Raja Chari. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Meet Your Lucky Stars: NASA Announces A New Class Of Astronaut Candidates

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An artist's conception of the KELT-9 system, which has a host star (left) that's almost twice as hot as our sun. The hot star blasts its nearby planet KELT-9b, leading to a dayside surface temperature of around 7,800 degrees Fahrenheit. NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC) hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC)

Scientists Discover A Scorched Planet With A Comet-Like Tail

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A brown dwarf can give off some light, allowing scientists — professional or volunteer — to search for the object as it moves across the sky. Chuck Carter and Gregg Hallinan/Caltech/NASA hide caption

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Chuck Carter and Gregg Hallinan/Caltech/NASA

Citizen Scientists Comb Images To Find An 'Overexcited Planet'

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An artist's rendering of the newly named Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory hide caption

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Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

NASA Plans To Launch A Probe Next Year To 'Touch The Sun'

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NASA Spacecraft Finds Storms On Jupiter

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This image shows Jupiter's south pole, as seen by NASA's Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles. The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles in diameter. NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles

Juno Spacecraft Reveals Spectacular Cyclones At Jupiter's Poles

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Isabel Seliger for NPR

Total Failure: When The Space Shuttle Didn't Come Home

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