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Brian Keith Thompson, owner of the Body Electric tattoo and piercing studio in Hollywood, says he is relentless in enforcing hygiene standards. Courtesy of Body Electric Tattoo hide caption

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Courtesy of Body Electric Tattoo

Teen Wants A Tattoo? Pediatricians Say Here's How To Do It Safely

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While benzodiazepines and SSRI antidepressants are not risk-free, says Yale psychiatrist Kimberly Yonkers, "it should be reassuring that we're not seeing a huge magnitude of an effect here" on pregnancy. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Xanax Or Zoloft For Moms-To-Be: A New Study Assesses Safety

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We're at this break point where we can read life code. We can copy life code. We can edit life code. - Juan Enriquez Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash/TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash/TED

Juan Enriquez: What Can Happen If Humans Control The Future Of Evolution?

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Paul Knoepfler on the TED stage. TED hide caption

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TED

Paul Knoepfler: What Are The Unintended Consequences Of Human Gene Editing?

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The new Medicare cards (right) will not use Social Security numbers for identification. Instead, they will have random sequences of letters and numbers. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services /AP hide caption

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Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services /AP

A smokestack rises in the background over the East Houston community of Manchester, Texas, where the air was heavy with what smelled like gasoline after Hurricane Harvey in late August. The neighborhood is ringed by industrial sites. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Air Pollution From Industry Plagues Houston In Harvey's Wake

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Researchers set out to answer this question: Is there a safe level of alcohol consumption during pregnancy? Turns out, that's a hard question to answer. The advice remains: Don't risk it. Tim Clayton/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Clayton/Corbis/Getty Images

Is One Drink OK For Pregnant Women? Around The Globe, The Answer Is No

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Residents of the community of Tujunga, Calif., flee a fire near Burbank on Sept. 2. Even people much farther from the flames are feeling health effects from acrid smoke. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Is All That Wildfire Smoke Damaging My Lungs?

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For the first time, scientists have carefully analyzed all the critters in a kitchen sponge. There turns out to be a huge number. Despite recent news reports, there is something you can do about it. Joy Ho for NPR hide caption

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Joy Ho for NPR

So Your Kitchen Sponge Is A Bacteria Hotbed. Here's What To Do

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Third-year students at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine learn how to trim crowns and prep a tooth for a crown. They're also learning to deal with the aftereffects, studying alternatives to opioids for pain relief. Jessica Cheung/NPR hide caption

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Jessica Cheung/NPR

Dental Schools Add An Urgent Lesson: Think Twice About Prescribing Opioids

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Michael Jacobson (right) and Bonnie Liebman, CSPI's director of nutrition, launching a campaign against over-salted food in the late 1970s. Courtesy of Center for Science in the Public Interest hide caption

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Courtesy of Center for Science in the Public Interest

A Pioneer Of Food Activism Steps Down, Looks Back

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Dr. Ruth Berggren stands outside Charity Hospital in New Orleans in 2005, where she had earlier cared for patients during Hurricane Katrina. Cheryl Gerber/AP hide caption

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Cheryl Gerber/AP