Senate Health Care Debate To Dismantle Obamacare Continues

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/539576114/539576115" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The microneedle patches developed at Georgia Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Drug Delivery each contain an array of needles less than a millimeter long. Courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

Glioblastomas are the most common malignant brain tumor. About 12,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with the cancer every year. Sherbrooke Connectivity Imaging Lab/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Sherbrooke Connectivity Imaging Lab/Science Source

John McCain Was Diagnosed With A Glioblastoma, Among The Deadliest Of Cancers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/538295015/538370727" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People who think they're more slothlike than peers may change their behavior to actually become less active. Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Just Thinking You're Slacking On Exercise Could Boost Risk Of Death

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/538157820/538608524" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tymia McCullough is a poised, pageant-winning 11-year-old from South Carolina. She also happens to have sickle cell anemia and relies on Medicaid to pay for medical care. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Liam James Doyle/NPR

Her Own Medical Future At Stake, A Child Storms Capitol Hill

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537208601/538148912" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers find that dementia patients who engage in activities such as gathering photographs and talking about family see improvements in their quality of life and are less agitated. Owen Franken/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Owen Franken/Getty Images

The goal was to make sure hospitals didn't send patients home too soon, without a plan for following up or without enough support at home to recover completely. Science Photo Library / Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Science Photo Library / Getty Images

A man walks past a building on the Google campus in Mountain View, Calif. Google search results about health can be influential, but sometimes they can be unreliable or wrong. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Chiu/AP

Seeking Online Medical Advice? Google's Top Results Aren't Always On Target

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537711453/537754646" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An image of Penicillium colonies. The white colony is a mutant similar to the mold found in Camembert cheese. The green ones are the wild form. Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe

Clare Kelley practices "forest bathing" along the edge of an urban forest on Roosevelt Island, in the middle of the Potomac River. In contrast to hiking, forest bathing is less directed, melding mindfulness and nature immersion to improve health. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Allison Aubrey/NPR

Forest Bathing: A Retreat To Nature Can Boost Immunity And Mood

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/536676954/537645975" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New research finds that African-Americans who grow up in harsh environments and endure stressful experiences are much more likely to develop Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Leland Bobbe/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Leland Bobbe/Getty Images

Stress And Poverty May Explain High Rates Of Dementia In African-Americans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/536935957/537509513" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript