NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Morning Edition

As Her Turn Leading The FEC Ends, Ravel Says Agency Is Broken

Corrected on December 31, 2015

A previous headline and Web introduction incorrectly said Ann Ravel is leaving the Federal Election Commission. In fact, she's halfway through a two-year term as commissioner; it's her one-year chairmanship that's ending.

Morning Edition

NBA Dares To Speak Out On Gun Violence

Corrected on December 31, 2015

A previous headline said the NBA was addressing "gun control issues" in its TV ads. In fact, the ads address gun violence.

'Fess Up, Grannies, You Ate The Butter Cookies

Corrected on December 30, 2015

A previous version of this article attributed a Royal Dansk article to Buzzfeed. The article was actually written by Creatrix Tiara, who posted on the Buzzfeed Community forum.

Fresh Air

Author JT LeRoy

Corrected on December 30, 2015

In 2001 Terry Gross interviewed novelist JT LeRoy, whose fiction had been described as autobiographical. In 2006 it was discovered that JT LeRoy did not exist, and was actually a hoax created by writer Laura Albert.

Morning Edition

He Was Born Republican Royalty, But 'Jebcito' Is From Miami

Corrected on December 29, 2015

A previous photo caption incorrectly identified Kendrick Meek as a U.S. senator. Meek was a Florida state senator, had served in the state House and went on to become a U.S. House member.

Morning Edition

Iñárritu Delivers A '360-Degree Emotional Experience' In 'The Revenant'

Corrected on December 24, 2015

Previous audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly stated that Michael Keaton won an Oscar for his performance in Birdman. He was nominated for best actor, but the Oscar was awarded to Eddie Redmayne for his performance in The Theory of Everything.

Morning Edition

Dear NBA: Why So Many Games?

Corrected on December 23, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say the Golden State Warriors were undefeated until last week. They actually lost their first game on Dec. 12.

All Things Considered

Rwanda's President Dangles The Possibility Of A Third Term

Corrected on December 22, 2015

The Web version of this story originally stated that Rwanda's President Paul Kagame has been the country's only president since the 1994 genocide. In fact, Pasteur Bizimungu served as president of Rwanda from 1994 to 2000.

Weekend Edition Sunday

How To Dodge Common Holiday Hazards

Corrected on December 21, 2015

In an earlier version of this story, bad advice was given about how to clear a jammed snowblower. Even if the snowblower is turned off, you should NOT reach in and use your hand to clear a jam. The blades might still spin and cause serious injury. Instead, to free the blades use an old broomstick or something else that you don't care about getting damaged.

Fact Check: Cruz's Misleading Charge About Rubio And Refugees

Corrected on December 18, 2015

In an earlier version of this post, Cassie Williams' organization was incorrectly identified as Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR). In fact, she is spokesperson for the Federation for Immigration Reform (FAIR).

Weekend Edition Sunday

'Harper's' Retracts 1998 Story By Stephen Glass; He Told Tale On NPR As Well

Corrected on December 17, 2015

Harper's Magazine has now retracted its 1998 story by then-journalist Stephen Glass. In a recent letter to the magazine, Glass detailed the fabrications in his piece, which was headlined "Prophets and Losses: The Futures Market for Phone Psychics." The magazine says "at least 5,647 of the 7,902 words of 'Prophets and Losses' were based on fabrications." This is the first retraction in Harper's 165-year history.

All Things Considered

Ex-Felons Fight To Restore Their Right To Vote

Corrected on December 12, 2015

In the production and reporting of this story, there was no formal agreement made about full names with the main subject of the story, whom NPR interviewed at a public clemency hearing. Following the broadcast of the story, NPR heard from the subject, who did not want full names used for privacy concerns and requested that the last name be omitted. The last name has been edited out of the Web version of the story.

Medicare Penalizes 758 Hospitals For Safety Incidents

Corrected on December 11, 2015

The initial version of this article incorrectly stated that two hospitals run by North Shore-LIJ Health System in New York are being penalized by Medicare for safety lapses. Five of the system's hospitals are being penalized.

Ask Me Another

Get In Shape

Corrected on December 11, 2015

In this final round, a question incorrectly stated that Ice Cube starred in Get Hard. While Ice Cube did star in Ride Along with Kevin Hart, he did not appear in Get Hard.

Sanders Passes 2 Million Donations, Nabs Two Endorsements

Corrected on December 10, 2015

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the only other person to raise $2 million at this point in a presidential campaign was Barack Obama in 2007. In fact it was Obama in 2011.

All Things Considered

Congress Still Limits Health Research On Gun Violence

Corrected on December 9, 2015

A previous web version of this story incorrectly attributed a quotation from Rush Holt on the lack of scientific evidence on firearms deaths to Nancy Krieger instead.

Morning Edition

VA Program Helps Incarcerated Veterans Transition Back Into Society

Corrected on December 9, 2015

A previous Web version of this story did not make clear that while the 28-day inpatient program Tullar went to was run by the VA, Veterans Village is an independent organization that receives money from the VA for certain programs.

Rejecting Appeal, Supreme Court Again Stays Out Of Gun Policy

Corrected on December 8, 2015

A previous version of this story incorrectly included language that said calling the guns in this case assault weapons is "anti-gun propaganda" and incorrectly attributed the quote to Justice Clarence Thomas' dissent.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Scientists Strike Giant Paleontological 'Gold'

Corrected on December 7, 2015

A previous headline on this story incorrectly used the word "archaeological," which refers to the study of ancient human activity.

NPR Music's 50 Favorite Albums Of 2015

Corrected on December 7, 2015

An earlier version of this story indicated Colleen's album Captain of None featured an upright bass. The bass sounds on the album were made by a viola da gamba processed through an octaver pedal.

Morning Edition

Facing Rising Waters, A Native Tribe Takes Its Plea To Paris Climate Talks

Corrected on December 2, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say that Quinault Tribal Council President Fawn Sharp will be attending the climate talks in Paris. It turns out that Sharp decided not to attend and that representatives from two other tribes in Washington state are going instead.

'A Charlie Brown Christmas' At 50

Corrected on November 30, 2015

A previous version of this story incorrectly said the retrospective would air at 7 p.m. and the original show at 8 p.m. They're actually airing at 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. ET, respectively.

All Things Considered

When Drug Treatment For Narcotic Addiction Never Ends

Corrected on November 25, 2015

The audio version of this story, as did a previous Web version, suggests that buprenorphine is used primarily as a short-term steppingstone to drug abstinence. In fact, long-term maintenance therapy with buprenorphine is a proven standard of care for opioid addiction.

Islamic State, ISIS, ISIL or Daesh?

Corrected on November 23, 2015

This post has been updated to reflect the nuances of the current NPR policy regarding the caveats "self-described" or "self-declared."

All Things Considered

Are Last-Minute Death Penalty Delays Cruel And Unusual Punishment?

Corrected on November 23, 2015

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly said that a federal appeals court had heard arguments in August but not yet ruled on the constitutionality of California's death penalty. In fact, the court recently overruled the previous decision on a technicality.

Morning Edition

Rival Arizona State Pulls Prank On University Of Arizona

Corrected on November 20, 2015

A previous version of this story mistakenly reported that both schools are on land taken from Mexico in the 1840s. In fact, the University of Arizona is on land that was purchased from Mexico.

Trump Amps It Up: Insulting Protesters, Putting Reporters In A 'Pen'

Corrected on November 19, 2015

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that Donald Trump had shaped his hands like a gun when discussing what should happen to Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. In fact it was someone else at the event who did that.

Nov. 20, 2015

We need to correct a correction we added to this post on Thursday. We originally said on this page that Donald Trump had shaped his hands like a gun when discussing what should happen to Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. Owing to a misunderstanding on Thursday, we removed that reference and added a correction that said Trump had not done that. In fact, as video of the event shows, Trump made a gun sign with his right hand and said, "Boom. Boom!" as he discussed what he thought should have been done to Bergdahl.

All Things Considered

World's Largest Jigsaw Puzzle 'Wildlife' Features Fantasy Forest

Corrected on November 19, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous headline, we mistakenly say the puzzle's name is "Wilderness." In fact, the puzzle's name is "Wildlife." Also, there's a mispronunciation. The artist's name is Adrian Chesterman, not Chesterton.

All Things Considered

A Tiny Pill Monitors Vital Signs From Deep Inside The Body

Corrected on November 19, 2015

An earlier version of this article said that Johns Hopkins University teamed up with NASA to develop a thermometer "pill." The correct name of the organization is the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics laboratory.

Does It Pay To Pay Teachers $100,000?

Corrected on November 19, 2015

In a previous version of this post, we stated that the average pay for a teacher is $36,000 a year. In fact, the figure is about $56,000.

Astros' Dallas Keuchel and Cubs' Jake Arrieta Win Cy Young Awards

Corrected on November 18, 2015

The original version of this post incorrectly said the Chicago Cubs played in the 2015 World Series.

Additionally, that version included results of Cy Young prediction voting from the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America, linked via ESPN. While those results matched the order of finish in the BBWAA voting, they were not the official Cy Young Award results.

Could Atropine Eyedrops Help Reduce Nearsightedness In Children?

Corrected on November 17, 2015

A previous version of this story identified Dr. David Epley as a past president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. He is a former president of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus and a spokesman for the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Also, we previously said Epley prescribes 1 percent atropine. He actually prescribes 0.01 percent.

Behind The Shortage Of Special Ed Teachers: Long Hours, Crushing Paperwork

Corrected on November 11, 2015

An earlier version of this story stated that Trevor Greene of the Highline, Wash., public schools had filled some special education teaching vacancies with teachers having only general education credentials. Greene says he was able to fill all of the positions with educators certified in special education.

Morning Edition

Adviser Armstrong Williams Sheds Light On Carson's Campaign

Corrected on November 10, 2015

In an earlier version of this conversation, our host said: "We've had Gen. [William] Westmoreland say he didn't meet Ben Carson." That was a mistake. Westmoreland died in 2005. There is no indication that he ever commented about whether he did or did not meet Carson in 1969.

Born In The USA: How America Created Iran's Nuclear Program

Corrected on November 10, 2015

The audio of this story, and an earlier Web version, said Iran provided a $20 million endowment to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the 1970s. The university said it never received an endowment from Iran. MIT said Iran did pay for more than 50 Iranian students to study nuclear engineering at the university in the mid-1970s.

Morning Edition

Bollywood Star Speaks Out Against 'Growing Intolerance' In India

Corrected on November 9, 2015

In this story, we refer to a series of killings of Muslims in India, which has sparked protest by artists and entertainers in that country. It is more accurate to say that so far two people have died in a series of attacks against Muslims.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Research Gains Funding, And Controversy

Corrected on November 5, 2015

An earlier version of this story inaccurately identified the Office of Research on Women's Health at NIH as the Office of Women's Health, which is at the Department of Health and Human Services. It also was unclear on NIH's process for determining research priorities on ME/CFS.

Review: Alessia Cara, 'Know It All'

Corrected on November 5, 2015

An earlier version of this story inaccurately identified the city of Brampton, Ontario, as part of Toronto.

Who Was The First To Try To Manipulate Birthrates? Not China!

Corrected on November 4, 2015

An earlier version of this post said China's one-child program received an award from "the United Nations Population Fund, the U.N.'s leading population agency." In fact, the award was presented by the Committee for the United Nations Population Fund.

Morning Edition

Poll Finds Americans, Especially Millennials, Moving Away From Religion

Corrected on November 3, 2015

A graphic on this post initially stated that 6.7 percent of recipients answered "Don't know/refused" to a question about religious identity in a 2007 survey. The correct number is 0.8 percent.

Also, a previous Web version of this story said the shares of the U.S. adult population who consider religion "very important" to them, pray daily and attend services at least once a month have declined between 3 and 4 percent over the past eight years; in fact, they declined between 3 and 4 percentage points.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Digging Into The Untold History Of Stuntwomen

Corrected on November 2, 2015

A previous headline and Web introduction to this story incorrectly gave the title of Mollie Gregory's new book as Guts and Glory.

Review: Bob Dylan, 'The Cutting Edge 1965-1966: The Bootleg Series Vol. 12'

Corrected on November 2, 2015

A previous version of this review incorrectly stated the song "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?" has never been released. The song was actually first released as a single in 1965 and later appeared on three separate compilations: Masterpieces, Biograph and A Musical History.

Morning Edition

What To Look For In The Third GOP Debate

Corrected on October 28, 2015

In his Morning Edition conversation with host Steve Inskeep, campaign strategist Stuart Stevens said the Republican Party had never nominated for president anyone who had not held public office. That left out Dwight D. Eisenhower, who had been supreme Allied commander in Europe during World War II and then supreme commander of NATO, before winning the nomination in 1952.

Latitudes: Our Favorite Global Music In October

Corrected on October 28, 2015

An earlier version of this article stated that the actress playing the role of Mastani, the second wife, in Bajirao Mastani is Priyanka Chopra. It is Deepika Padukone. Chopra plays the role of the first wife.

All Things Considered

Next Year Could Mark The End Of Polio

Corrected on October 26, 2015

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly included Theodore Roosevelt as one of the people affected by polio.

Lincoln Chafee Ends His Presidential Campaign

Corrected on October 23, 2015

An earlier version of this article said Chafee graduated from Montana State University. He graduated from Brown University and then from MSU's horse farrier program.

All Things Considered

Lawsuits Target 'Debtors' Prisons' Across the Country

Corrected on October 22, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say Nashville, Tenn., is among six municipalities against which lawsuits have been filed. While such a lawsuit was filed in Nashville, it was actually against Rutherford County, Tenn.

All Things Considered

As Attacks Mount, Israelis Describe Lives Lost And Families Shattered

Corrected on October 22, 2015

The original on-air and online versions of this story mischaracterized the Western Wall as the holiest site in Judaism. It is the holiest site for Jewish prayer, while the adjacent Temple Mount is considered the holiest site.

What It's Like To Take Photos Of A Dying Man

Corrected on October 21, 2015

A previous version of this story included a bracketed note identifying a surgery as a "lung transplant." He Quangui did not have a lung transplant. Also, in the caption for the photo at the top of the post, the original information was incorrect. The doctor is not puncturing He Quangui's lungs; he is puncturing his chest cavity to release air that escaped from his damaged lungs.

Nevada Shuts Down Daily Fantasy Sports Sites

Corrected on October 16, 2015

A previous version of this post incorrectly stated that daily fantasy sports sites such as FanDuel and DraftKings claim to operate under a chance-based wagering model. The sites actually say they use a skill-based wagering model and therefore shouldn't be subject to gambling regulations.

All Things Considered

Japan Can Now Send Its Military Abroad, But Will It?

Corrected on October 16, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, the recently passed security bills are referred to as a "change to the ... Constitution." The bills changed the interpretation of the Japanese Constitution, not the actual text.

All Things Considered

Palestinians Confront Escalating Violence In Jerusalem After Attacks

Corrected on October 14, 2015

In this report, a Palestinian father is quoted saying his son was angry about a video showing a Palestinian woman who was accused of attacking an Israeli and was killed by Israeli police. In fact, as we reported later in the story, the woman was not killed. She was injured and is in Israeli custody.

Morning Edition

For Syrians In Rebel Areas, Russian Airstrikes Add To Their Misery

Corrected on October 14, 2015

In the audio of this story, the introduction states that Russian sea-launched missiles landed in areas controlled by rebels who are seeking a free Syria. In fact, it's still not clear where the missiles landed and whether they hit areas controlled by the self-proclaimed Islamic State or by moderate rebels controlling other areas.

James Blake Covers 'The Sound of Silence'

Corrected on October 12, 2015

A previous version of this story said the new version of "The Sound of Silence" was performed by James Blake and Justin Vernon. Vernon did not perform on the song.

Belarusian Journalist Svetlana Alexievich Wins Literature Nobel

Corrected on October 8, 2015

A previous version of this story stated that Alexievich is the 108th writer to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. In fact, it is the 108th prize to be awarded — but, because of instances in which the prize was shared, Alexievich is the 112th winner.

Hillary Clinton's Gun Proposals Expose Democratic Divide

Corrected on October 5, 2015

An early version of this article used an incorrect last name for Nicole Hockley, parent of a Sandy Hook shooting victim. It has also been updated to reflect Sanders' position on semiautomatic weapons.

All Things Considered

The Synod Could Be The Defining Moment Of Francis' Papacy

Corrected on October 5, 2015

Our guest incorrectly says Catholics who are separated and divorced do not have access to the sacraments. In fact, it is only separated and divorced Catholics who have civilly remarried who are excluded from some sacraments, like Communion.

For Environmentalists, Mines Near Wilderness Are Too Close For Comfort

Corrected on October 5, 2015

The photo credits on a previous version of this story were reversed. Ellie Bayrd took the individual photos of Dave and Amy Freeman; Alex Chocholousek took the group shot. Additionally, we previously did not include the information that Twin Metals Minnesota is owned by Antofagasta PLC, a Chilean company based in Santiago.

Morning Edition

Get Ready To Pay More To Enter Some National Parks

Corrected on October 1, 2015

An earlier Web version of this story said about 100 parks would increase fees on Thursday. The story has been updated to clarify that fees at some parks — not about 100 — will hike fees on Thursday.

At What Point Does A Fundraising Ad Go Too Far?

Corrected on October 1, 2015

The original version of this post said the print ad showing starving children, from the East African Emergency campaign run by the Disasters Emergency Committee, brought in $23 million between 1980 and 1984 for famine relief in Ethiopia. In fact, that sum represents the total amount raised by the campaign, which also used TV ads and other types of appeals.

Morning Edition

Many Guesses, But No Answers On Joe Biden's Plans

Corrected on September 30, 2015

In a previous version of this story, we said that Vice President Biden was last asked about a possible presidential run during a Sept. 10 appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. In fact, he has been asked about it since then, including during a Sept. 17 interview with the Jesuit news outlet America Media.


Update on Oct. 2; a second correction

A previous version of this story placed the Oct. 13 Democratic debate in Denver. It will be in Las Vegas.

Morning Edition

Why Women's Sports Get So Little Attention

Corrected on September 30, 2015

In an earlier version of the audio for this conversation, it was said that after the Women's World Cup "there was no carryover. There was no women's soccer league to go on and to pick up that attention." In fact, there is a National Women's Soccer League with teams in nine cities. Whether the attention paid to the World Cup will give the league a boost is not yet known.


Update on Oct. 1

We've also broadcast a correction. It's here.


Update on Oct. 2; a second correction

In this conversation, it's said that the commissioner of the WNBA should "go to Las Vegas and try to get them to establish a betting line" on the league's games. That was a mistake. There is betting on WNBA games in Las Vegas, as well as on other women's sports.

All Things Considered

In Limbo, In Love, In America: The Story Of A Syrian Asylum-Seeker

Corrected on September 29, 2015

The audio of this story, as did a previous version of the Web story, incorrectly states that Khaled has another hearing regarding his asylum claim, in January 2016. According to Khaled, immigration authorities denied his asylum claim, placed him on supervised release and ordered his deportation. He says he has not been informed of when — or to which country — he might be deported. Lori K. Haley, a spokeswoman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, says in a statement provided to NPR that Khaled "was ordered removed by an immigration judge with the Department of Justice's Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) in August 2014. In December 2014, he was released from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody on an order of supervision, which requires him to report regularly to ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations officers in Orange County while his removal order is in effect." Khaled currently has no pending appeals, Haley says.

Pope Francis Says Goodbye, As U.S. Trip Concludes In Philadelphia

Corrected on September 28, 2015

A previous version of this post wrongly stated that Pope Francis referred to the Supreme Court's legalization of same-sex marriage as "a tragic error" and a "profoundly immoral and unjust" decision. The pope did not say this. The remarks were part of an Associated Press report on the views of U.S. bishops.

Pope: 'God Weeps' For Victims Of Sex Abuse

Corrected on September 28, 2015

A previous version of this post wrongly stated that Pope Francis referred to the Supreme Court's legalization of same-sex marriage as "a tragic error" and a "profoundly immoral and unjust" decision. The pope did not say this. The remarks were part of an Associated Press report on the views of U.S. bishops.

Say My Name: Baby Giant Panda Is Named ... Bei Bei

Corrected on September 28, 2015

An earlier version of this post said Bei Bei had been named after turning 100 days old as tradition dictates. In fact, the National Zoo broke with tradition, saying that "scientists and keepers at giant panda breeding and research centers in China do not wait 100 days to name cubs born at those facilities."

Morning Edition

The Complicated History Of Popes And U.S. Presidents

Corrected on September 23, 2015

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly identified the pope with whom former President Dwight D. Eisenhower met as John Paul XXIII. It was John XXIII.

Obama Won't Rate Colleges, So We Did

Corrected on September 22, 2015

The earlier version of these charts incorrectly referred to wages after graduation. The College Scorecard actually reports student earnings after entering college, whether or not they graduate.

Morning Edition

Federal Reserve Officials Leave Interest Rates Steady

Corrected on September 18, 2015

In the audio of this story, we say the U.S. economy has "been producing more than 200,000 new jobs every month for several years." We should have said the U.S. economy has gained an average 200,000 a month over the past several years.

All Things Considered

Giving More Workers Overtime Could Have Downsides, Employers Say

Corrected on September 16, 2015

A listener emailed to say that this story misstates the current law on overtime rules and the proposed changes. He is right that many workers who make more than the Labor Department's new proposed threshold of $50,440 a year would be eligible for overtime pay. There is a "duties test," which considers the nature of a person's work. If the work is not "professional" or "white collar" in nature, overtime may be paid. Also, some employers may simply choose to pay overtime. Our story focused on the estimated 6 million workers whose jobs would qualify for overtime because of the proposed rules. The story also focused on how businesses are reacting to the change in rules.

All Things Considered

The Dark Side Of Funny: Growing Up In George Carlin's Shadow

Corrected on September 16, 2015

The audio of this story, as did a previous version of the Web story, incorrectly attributes George Carlin's "fruity baby boomer" bit to his 2008 HBO special. In fact, it's from Carlin's 1999 HBO special.

3 Astronauts Walk Into NPR ...

Corrected on September 15, 2015

A previous version of this story misspelled Samantha Cristoforetti's last name as Christforetti.

Morning Edition

Judge Refuses To Stop Name Change For New York College

Corrected on September 14, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say Paul Smith's College in New York changed its name to Joan Weill-Paul Smith's College. In fact, school officials say, the name wasn't changed. A judge ruled against a group of alumni that filed a petition to block the change, but the state Supreme Court has yet to rule on the challenge.

How Many Children Under 5 Die A Year In The U.S. Vs. Angola?

Corrected on September 9, 2015

The chart in an earlier version of this post stated that the estimated deaths for children under age five were per 100,000 live births. That number should be per 1,000 live births. The post has been corrected.

The Migrant Crisis, By The Numbers

Corrected on September 9, 2015

A previous version of this story said the U.S. had taken in fewer than 1,000 Syrian refugees. The figure is now 1,500, according to the State Department.

Television 2015: Hammering On The Door Of Diversity

Corrected on September 5, 2015

While Rachel Bloom, the star of the CW's Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, wasn't introduced at the panel (according to the transcript) as a producer, the CW later sent word that she is in fact a producer on the show. That means the CW had two female producers, not one as originally stated, and that there were a total of 48 men and six women, rather than five.

Morning Edition

Nativism And Economic Anxiety Fuel Trump's Populist Appeal

Corrected on September 4, 2015

This post originally said George Wallace helped "lead" white Southern voters to the GOP. As the story stated, Wallace was a Democrat, so it's better to say Wallace pushed these voters toward the Republican Party.

Morning Edition

As More Adults Pedal, Their Biking Injuries And Deaths Spike, Too

Corrected on September 3, 2015

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly stated that Dr. Benjamin Breyer is affiliated with University of San Francisco. He is an associate professor of urology at University of California, San Francisco.

All Things Considered

WATCH: Octopuses Appear To Take Up Arms As Submarine Warfare Escalates

Corrected on September 3, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we identify Peter Godfrey-Smith as a marine biologist at City University of New York. He's actually a professor of philosophy there and a professor of history and philosophy of science at the University of Sydney.

All Things Considered

Shooters Quicker To Pull Trigger When Target Is Black, Study Finds

Corrected on August 30, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, our guest incorrectly says that participants in the studies had "less than a millisecond to respond." In fact, they had less than a second.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Italy, Land Of Pizza And Pasta, Is Gluten-Free Friendly

Corrected on August 28, 2015

The audio for this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that the Italian government allows people with celiac disease to take extra time off work to prepare gluten-free food and that Italian children are routinely tested for celiac disease. Neither is the case.

All Things Considered

Kansas, South Carolina Take NIMBY Stance On Guantanamo Prisoners

Corrected on August 26, 2015

Previous audio and Web versions of this story said the Pentagon had surveyed facilities in Kansas and South Carolina for housing Guantanamo detainees. The Charleston, S.C., facility has not yet been surveyed.

Morning Edition

Beyond Jane Fonda Tapes: Home Workouts Go Virtual

Corrected on August 26, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we refer to Peloton spinning classes. Peloton is not affiliated with the Spinning brand.

All Things Considered

New York Begins To Question Solitary Confinement As Default

Corrected on August 25, 2015

An earlier version of this story included a photo of Rikers Island, a facility run by the city of New York. The photo has been removed because the jail is not associated with the statewide changes affecting solitary confinement.

Accusations Of Game-Throwing Rile Little League Softball World Series

Corrected on August 19, 2015

An earlier version of the post stated that West had already advanced to the semifinals before it faced the Southeast team, which is from North Carolina. Actually, both semifinal spots were still open, and while West entered the game undefeated, the loss put it in a three-way tie to advance.

Guzzling 9,000 Years Of History With 'The Comic Book Story Of Beer'

Corrected on August 18, 2015

An earlier version of this post stated that "in ancient Rome, women were the brewers." This is inaccurate. An earlier version also incorrectly stated that lagers were born out of industrial espionage. In fact, lagers predated the espionage; it instead led to the reinvigoration of the Marzenbier style and creation of the Vienna Lager style of beer.

Morning Edition

After Katrina, New Orleans' Public Housing Is A Mix Of Pastel And Promises

Corrected on August 18, 2015

A previous version of the graphic misstated the number of households living in Columbia Parc (incorrect: 223 total and 116 returning; correct: 229 total and 107 returning) and Faubourg Lafitte (incorrect: 193 total and 123 returning; correct: 141 total and 123 returning).

All Things Considered

Take It From David Brooks: Career Success 'Doesn't Make You Happy'

Corrected on August 17, 2015

During this conversation, David Brooks says that in 1950 the Gallup organization asked high school seniors the question "are you a very important person?" and "12 percent said yes." Brooks also says "[Gallup] asked again in 2005, and it was 80 percent who said they were a very important person." He mistakenly attributed the survey to Gallup. While the study of adolescent attitudes supports the sociological trend, the survey was done by other researchers and in different years than the ones he mentioned. Brooks was citing material in his book The Road to Character. Its eBook edition has now been updated to say: "Between 1948 and 1954, psychologists asked more than 10,000 adolescents whether they considered themselves to be a very important person. At that point, 12 percent said yes. The same question was revisited in 1989, and this time it wasn't 12 percent who considered themselves very important, it was 80 percent of boys and 77 percent of girls."

Unfolding The History Of Napkin Art

Corrected on August 13, 2015

A previous version of this story stated that Li Tre Trattati, by Matthia Giegher, was published in 1639. It was, in fact, first published in 1629.

5 Big Ideas That Don't Work In Education

Corrected on August 13, 2015

An earlier version of this story stated that John Hattie is not a statistician. He actually holds a Ph.D. in statistics and measurement.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Caught In The Act: Joke-Stealing In The Age Of Twitter

Corrected on August 2, 2015

In the audio version of this piece, we say that the Delta joke allegedly appeared in Conan O'Brien's monologue the night after it was posted online. In fact, the lawsuit alleges it appeared in the monologue that same night.

Do Fish Names Encourage Fishy Business?

Corrected on July 30, 2015

An earlier version of this article quoted chef Jeremy Sewall as saying he buys American red snapper from "the Gulf of Mexico and adjacent Pacific waters." He says his snapper originate from the Gulf and adjacent parts of the Atlantic Ocean.

Can You Have An Album On iTunes If You Don't Exist?

Corrected on July 18, 2015

A previous version of this story attributed the exposure of the Lucia Cole hoax to a single blog, Pop Culture Died In 2009. It's the Internet, so things are more complicated than that — a number of Twitter users, fan sites and message board users first uncovered most of the fabrications.

What Hats Tell Us About American Men

Corrected on July 18, 2015

A previous version of this post identified Alexander Hamilton as Washington's Secretary of State. In fact, he was Secretary of the Treasury.

5 Things We've Learned About 2016 Presidential Fundraising

Corrected on July 16, 2015

This piece originally stated that Bernie Sanders' campaign was the second-place fundraiser thus far. While Sanders took in the second-most last quarter, Marco Rubio's campaign has in fact taken in more during this election cycle, counting the money he rolled in from his Senate committee. The chart has also been corrected to reflect Bush's total cash on hand at the end of the second quarter.

All Things Considered

Beyond A Bailout: Greece Needs Debt Relief, IMF Says

Corrected on July 16, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say economists generally agree countries get in trouble when their debt exceeds 90 percent of their annual gross domestic product. While true at one time, economists today take a more nuanced view. They generally say many factors influence the point at which a country's debt becomes unsustainable.

'Go Set A Watchman' Is A Revelation On Race, Not A Disappointment

Corrected on July 16, 2015

A previous version of this story referred to Go Set a Watchman as a "sequel" to To Kill a Mockingbird. That's not quite right. Legitimate questions abound as to whether Harper Lee and her earlier editors intended this manuscript to be published as a sequel, or whether it was a discarded rough draft of what would become Mockingbird.

Whatever the case may be, the manuscript has been published, and we've chosen to engage with it on its face. — Tasneem Raja, senior editor, Code Switch

Twitter Campaign Shows A Rosier Side Of Africa

Corrected on July 16, 2015

The original version of this post included a tweet with four images that were identified as Senegal's Lake Retba or Le Lac Rose, the waters of which have a pink hue. In fact, not all of the images were of this lake. We have deleted this tweet.

3 Emerging Themes From #RaceOnTech

Corrected on July 15, 2015

An earlier version of this post failed to attribute the quote about the privilege of wealth and education. It was tweeted by Kortney Ryan Ziegler.

Fresh Air

Ta-Nehisi Coates On Police Brutality, The Confederate Flag And Forgiveness

Corrected on July 14, 2015

In the audio of this story, we incorrectly said Ta-Nehisi Coates won a 2015 National Magazine Award for his Atlantic story "The Case For Reparations." Coates was a finalist for the "Essays and Criticism" prize in 2015. He won the National Magazine Award for "Essays and Criticism" in 2013 for his Atlantic article "Fear of a Black President."

Weekend Edition Sunday

French, English, Comics: Proust On Memory, In Any Language

Corrected on July 13, 2015

This piece originally stated in error that this was a reissue of an earlier English translation; it is a new English translation of an existing graphic novel adaptation.

5 Things You Should Know About Scott Walker

Corrected on July 12, 2015

In an earlier version of this story, we incorrectly said Scott Walker was born in Boulder, Colo. He was actually born in Colorado Springs. We also incorrectly indicated that his hometown was Waukesha.

'Aurora' Journeys In A New Direction

Corrected on July 7, 2015

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to the starship as Aurora. In fact the ship is unnamed. Aurora is the name of a moon that the ship travels to.

Fresh Air

How A Historical Blunder Helped Create The Water Crisis In The West

Corrected on July 6, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, our guest incorrectly says that the Navajo Generating Station consumes about 22,000 tons of coal each year. In fact, it consumes about 22,000 tons of coal each day.

5 Things You Should Know About Jim Webb

Corrected on July 4, 2015

A previous version of this post incorrectly stated that Jim Webb had won the 1967 U.S. Naval Academy boxing championship, defeating Oliver North. Webb lost in a decision.

How Salt + Car Battery = Clean Water

Corrected on July 2, 2015

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly said that the SE200 had been field-tested last month. The testing was actually in May. We also incorrectly said the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency spent $6 million developing a pen-size water purification system. It was actually Mountain Safety Research that spent that money to develop the purification system, with support from DARPA.

Morning Edition

Same-Sex Marriage Ruling Doesn't Make It Biblically Correct, Pastor Says

Corrected on June 30, 2015

The Supreme Court decision does not say that pastors are required to perform same-sex marriages. In fact, the Supreme Court said ministers who do not approve of same-sex marriages can't be forced to perform them. The court decision applies only to government functions, not religious ceremonies. But many of those who are now criticizing the court decision believe pastors will be pressured to go against their beliefs.

Morning Edition

New Documentary Finds Nina Simone 'In Between The Black And White Keys'

Corrected on June 29, 2015

The audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, Nina Simone's piano teacher is misidentified as a Russian immigrant. Muriel Mazzanovich was a British citizen who married into a Croatian family and took her husband's name.

5 Things You Should Know About Bobby Jindal

Corrected on June 24, 2015

An earlier version of this story said that President George W. Bush appointed Jindal to be assistant secretary for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2011. The correct year is 2001.

The Complicated Political History Of The Confederate Flag

Corrected on June 22, 2015

An earlier version of this story stated the first shots of the Civil War were fired in April 1961. The correct year is 1861. It was also updated to correct the 1962 legislative process that first flew the flag in South Carolina, which was passed by the state Legislature and did not go through Gov. Fritz Hollings.

One 'Overnight,' Two Couples, Countless Boundaries Violated

Corrected on June 19, 2015

This review originally was published under the byline of Ella Taylor, who wrote our review this week of Infinitely Polar Bear. It should be credited to Tomas Hachard.

It also initially referred to Kurt's son as Wade; the son is actually Max.

All Things Considered

DNA Confirms Kennewick Man's Genetic Ties To Native Americans

Corrected on June 18, 2015

A previous Web version of this story referred incorrectly to the Colville tribe. We should have said the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation. Many thanks to readers who let us know.

U.S. Women Beat Nigeria 1-0, Win Group And Advance To Elimination Rounds

Corrected on June 17, 2015

A previous version of this post said Abby Wambach made her first World Cup start in the match with Nigeria. In fact, she was in the starting lineup in a game with Australia. The post also said a Nigerian defender was ejected owing to yellow cards in the U.S. game and in a previous game. She actually received both cards in the U.S. match.

Obama Immigrant Detention Policies Under Fire

Corrected on June 16, 2015

A previous version of this post incorrectly identified the group that is involved in a lawsuit challenging detention facilities. It is the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, not the ACLU.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Israel Bringing Its Years Of Desalination Experience To California

Corrected on June 15, 2015

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that all of Eilat's water comes from desalinated seawater. While this accounts for some of Eilat's water, most of it actually comes from brackish well water that's been desalinated.

Making Sense Of Rachel Dolezal, The Alleged White Woman Who Passed As Black

Corrected on June 13, 2015

A previous version of this post included a quote attributed to feminist critic bell hooks; in fact, the statement was posted by a bell hooks fan page and was never said by the author. The statement compared Dolezal to Iggy Azalea and asked, "Why waste time being at the bottom of a lengthy hierarchy of white women ... when you can be fast tracked to the top of the hierarchy of black women?"

The Dangers Of Political 'Foot-In-Mouth' Syndrome

Corrected on June 5, 2015

An earlier version of this post incorrectly noted that Pope Francis had a master's degree in chemistry. In fact, according to his official biography, he "graduated as a chemical technician."

Morning Edition

Are The Vaccine Court's Requirements Too Strict?

Corrected on June 5, 2015

Our radio introduction to this story does not correctly present the story that follows. The story looks at how the vaccine court adjudicates cases where people claim to have been injured by a vaccine. It does not address vaccine effectiveness or any trade-off between effectiveness and the risk of side effects.

All Things Considered

What Is The Role Of Jails In Treating The Mentally Ill?

Corrected on June 5, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we refer to Sara Hough as a psychiatrist. In fact, she is a psychologist. Also, in 2013 she was a program head in the the Department of Mental Health at the Twin Towers Correctional Facility, not the head of clinical psychiatry.

Morning Edition

Senate Allows 3 Provisions Within The Patriot Act To Expire

Corrected on June 1, 2015

We say that a government program that collects phone records of millions of Americans was suspended as of Monday morning. In fact, the program actually expired. Congress is now negotiating a replacement for that provision.

America's Elite Cows Don't Give Birth — Their Surrogates Do

Corrected on May 30, 2015

A previous version of this story stated that elite cows are typically bred by bulls through in vitro fertilization. In fact, they are commonly artificially inseminated. In vitro fertilization is sometimes used in a slightly different process.

Why A Journalist Scammed The Media Into Spreading Bad Chocolate Science

Corrected on May 29, 2015

A previous version of this story referred to a Daily Mail headline on the weight loss benefits of eating chocolate, a photo of which also accompanied Bohannon's story on io9. In fact, the Daily Mail story pictured there addressed another study, not the one conducted by Bohannon. However, the Daily Mail did indeed cover Bohannon's study in another story.

Morning Edition

Charter To Pay $78B For Time Warner Cable

Corrected on May 26, 2015

We say that John Malone is the head of Charter Communications, the company that has announced a deal to acquire Time Warner Cable. Malone, the chairman of Liberty Media, is a key figure driving the deal. But he is not the chairman or CEO of Charter. Tom Rutledge is the CEO of Charter Communications.

Morning Edition

Biology Professor's Calling: Teach Deaf Students They Can Do Anything

Corrected on May 20, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we identify Caroline Solomon as an associate professor at Gallaudet. She is a full professor. We also say she won the 2013 Teacher of the Year award. It's actually the 2013 Distinguished Faculty Award.

Morning Edition

Obama Touts New Jersey City's Success In Policing Efforts

Corrected on May 19, 2015

We say that police in Camden, N.J., are not part of a union. In fact, even though their labor contract with the city was dissolved, the officers are represented by Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 218.

Morning Edition

Conservative, Catholic Ireland Votes On Same-Sex Marriage

Corrected on May 19, 2015

In the original Web version of this story, we said that same-sex marriage is legal in about 18 countries. We've adjusted the number to 17 because Finland's law has yet to take effect.

Morning Edition

Cleveland Braces For Verdict In 2012 Police Shooting

Corrected on May 18, 2015

In early versions of this story, we reported that Cleveland City Councilman Kevin Conwell said he would go out "rioting" if police officer Michael Brelo is acquitted in the shooting death of two black suspects. That was incorrect. Conwell said he would be "riding" in his district if the officer is acquitted.

All Things Considered

Coming To Terms With The Boston Marathon Bomber's Sentence

Corrected on May 16, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web summary, we say the Boston community is not in agreement over the jury's verdict. We should have said that there are differences over the jury-imposed sentence of Tsarnaev, not the verdict.

Weekend Edition Sunday

A Trade Deal Read In Secret By Only A Few (Or Maybe None)

Corrected on May 15, 2015

A previous version of this story said that senators who read the draft TPP language do so in a secure room under the watchful gaze of an official from the U.S. Trade Representative's office. The USTR says the policy has been changed and that no representative is sent to the room unless a senator requests one.

Staying In Tune Isn't So Easy In 'Pitch Perfect 2'

Corrected on May 15, 2015

This review originally misstated that Jessie J wrote the song "Flashlight." She performs it on the soundtrack, but it was written by Sia, Sam Smith, Jason Moore, and Christian Guzman.

All Things Considered

Facebook Courts News Giants Into A Deal To Share Viewers, And Revenues

Corrected on May 14, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we mischaracterize some aspects of the way revenue from ad sales will be handled, particularly regarding The Atlantic and its Facebook Instant Articles. All the media companies will keep 100 percent of the revenue from ads they sell that appear with their Facebook Instant Articles. If Facebook assists in any ad sales, the revenue will be split. The Atlantic will sell its own ads. But if The Atlantic has unsold ad positions, Facebook may sell ads to fill those spots. In that case, Facebook and The Atlantic will share the revenue. In addition, in the audio we say Facebook and the news publishers will split profits on ad sales. They'll actually split revenue on those sales.

Morning Edition

White House Move To Protect Nest Eggs Sparks Hopes And Fears

Corrected on May 14, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say stockbrokers are already held to a fiduciary standard but that because of loopholes they can still get commissions for steering people into bad investments with high fees. In fact, some financial planners are held to a fiduciary standard, and by getting registered both as financial planners and as stockbrokers they can evade that fiduciary standard and get commissions for steering people into such investments.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Being Transgender At Work Can Be Hard, But Made Easier With An Ally

Corrected on May 13, 2015

In the audio of this story, we incorrectly refer to Andrea Zekis' employer as the Highway Department and the Little Rock, Ark., Highway Department. The correct name is Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department. A previous Web version also called it the Highway Department.

Short On Sleep? You Could Be A Disaster Waiting To Happen

Corrected on May 12, 2015

A previous version of this story erroneously attributed Stonewall Jackson's death by friendly fire to sleep deprivation. There is no evidence that his wounding and death were connected to lack of sleep.

Planetary Society Set To Launch Solar Sail Experiment

Corrected on May 12, 2015

A previous version of this post incorrectly said that the satellite LightSail is contained within the somewhat larger Prox-1 satellite developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology. In fact, it is the second LightSail satellite that will be deployed via the Prox-1 spacecraft. It also stated that the LightSail is pushed along by the solar wind, but is in fact is powered by photons.

Fresh Air

The Great 'Beyond': Contemplating Life, Sex And Elevators In Space

Corrected on May 11, 2015

A previous Web version of this story suggested that astronomer Chris Impey blames sharp budget cuts by NASA in the past four years for the slowdown in successful human efforts to colonize outer space. Impey actually said: "NASA's budget isn't growing, but it's also not declining."

Morning Edition

Two Guys In Paris Aim To Charm The World Into Climate Action

Corrected on May 11, 2015

In the audio version of this story, we report that the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action, or ADP, is trying to get 200 countries to agree to take action on climate change. The actual number is 196 countries.

Morning Edition

Obama To Ambitious Teen: 'You've Got This Strength Inside Yourself'

Corrected on May 11, 2015

In a previous Web version of this story, we incorrectly quote President Obama as saying, "But one of the things you've discovered is you have this strength inside yourself." In fact, the president said, "But one of the things you've discovered is you've got this strength inside yourself."

Morning Edition

Shaping State Laws With Little Scrutiny

Corrected on May 11, 2015

As we reported, Arizona Republican state Sen. Russell Pearce was the originator of the draft legislation that later became the immigration law known as Arizona SB 1070. Although Corrections Corporation of America did have a representative at the American Legislative Exchange Council meeting where model legislation similar to 1070 was drafted, we didn't mean to suggest that CCA wrote the language.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Kansas City Royals Break Bad: The Week In Sports

Corrected on May 8, 2015

In this conversation, our guest says that pitcher Yordano Ventura of the Kansas City Royals hit the White Sox's Adam Eaton with a pitch. In fact, Eaton was not hit with the pitch. But he and Ventura exchanged words and a brawl ensued. We also say that Ventura had been throwing at opposing players' heads. While he has hit some players and has angered others with inside pitches, it was not correct to say that Ventura was targeting their heads.

Amy Schumer Puts Her Own Looks On Trial

Corrected on May 6, 2015

A previous version of this post incorrectly said that Henry Fonda and John Hawkes play the role of the foreman in 12 Angry Men and Amy Schumer's adaptation, respectively. In fact, they play regular members of the jury.

First Aid Kit: Tiny Desk Concert

Corrected on May 6, 2015

An earlier version of this report mistakenly identified Klara Söderberg as her sister Johanna Söderberg (and vice versa). The mistake has been corrected.

All Things Considered

A Poker Battle Against A Computer

Corrected on May 5, 2015

In a previous Web version of this story, we incorrectly state that Boris Kasparov played Deep Blue in 1997. In fact, it was Garry Kasparov.

'Into The Wild' Author Tries Science To Solve Toxic Seed Mystery

Corrected on May 4, 2015

An earlier version of this story referred to the University of Fairbanks. It is the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. In addition, an earlier version said hunters found Christopher McCandless' body months after he died. In fact, it was weeks later.

The Great Success And Enduring Dilemma Of Cervical Cancer Screening

Corrected on May 4, 2015

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the American College of Physicians has a preference for co-testing over cytology alone for women over 30. In fact, the ACP does not have this stated preference; it's best-practice advice says clinicians may use co-testing.

Morning Edition

Libraries Make Space For 3-D Printers; Rules Are Sure To Follow

Corrected on April 29, 2015

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said it took close to seven hours to print a play sword from the game Minecraft. It actually took about 90 minutes. Seven hours refers to a different part made using the 3-D printer.

All Things Considered

Baltimore Officials Face Criticism For Slow Response To Riots

Corrected on April 28, 2015

We incorrectly say that Gil Kerlikowske was with the Seattle police department during the 1999 WTO riots. In fact, Kerlikowske joined the department in 2000 and was police chief during tumultuous protests on the one-year anniversary of the WTO meeting.

Morning Edition

Why Do Courts Still Deliver Many Legal Documents By Hand?

Corrected on April 24, 2015

David Nill's name was misspelled as Nils in an earlier version of this transcript. Also, a clarification: Nill suggests that an electronic system for serving legal papers could make delivery easier and faster in many cases. He believes that such a system should require a recipient to opt in — in other words, to agree to receive the document. If a person did not opt in, delivery would not occur.

All Things Considered

Looming Budget Cuts Pit National Guard Against The Army

Corrected on April 22, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly state that some of the Blackhawk helicopters maintained at the Army National Guard at Joint Base Lewis-McChord had been flown in the Vietnam War. In fact, the Chinook helicopters at the base were flown in Vietnam.

Debate: Is It Time To Abolish The Death Penalty?

Corrected on April 22, 2015

A previous version of this story incorrectly called Barry Scheck the first vice president of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. Scheck is a past president of the NACDL but is not a current officer.

Humans' Use Of Pain-Relief Creams Proves Fatal To Felines

Corrected on April 21, 2015

An earlier version of this story said that toxic levels of NSAIDS were found in cats. In fact, veterinarians found physical damage such as perforation of the intestines and kidney damage typical of NSAID toxicity.

Morning Edition

Anti-Test 'Opt-Out' Movement Makes A Wave In New York State

Corrected on April 21, 2015

Previous audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly stated that the tests being used in New York state this year are the PARCC exams. In fact, New York is not administering those exams this year.

How AeroPress Fans Are Hacking Their Way To A Better Cup Of Coffee

Corrected on April 16, 2015

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that there were 24 competitors in the 2015 World AeroPress Championship, which was held in the U.S. for the first time. There were, in fact, 35 competitors, and this is the second time the WAC has been held in the U.S.

How To Be Alone: Musicians Confront Solitude

Corrected on April 16, 2015

A previous version of this story incorrectly identified the title of Laura Marling's song "I Feel Your Love" as "How Can I" and called Short Movie Marling's seventh album. It is her fifth.

Morning Edition

Church Ceremonies Push North Dakota Town To Grapple With Gay Rights

Corrected on April 14, 2015

Previous audio and Web versions of this story referred to marriage as a sacrament. But there are only two sacraments recognized by the United Methodist Church — baptism and the Lord's Supper (or Holy Communion).

Weekend Edition Saturday

A Day's A Day The World Around — But Shorter On Saturn

Corrected on April 14, 2015

This post originally stated that it takes the Earth 23 hours, 56 minutes and 4 seconds to complete one rotation and that we round up to 24-hour days. But that additional 3 minutes, 56 seconds takes actually into account Earth's movement around the sun.

Pakistan's Parliament Rejects Joining Saudi Coalition In Yemen

Corrected on April 10, 2015

In an earlier version of this article, we incorrectly quoted Philip Reeves as saying that the Pakistanis often help the Saudis in times of crisis. In fact, it's the reverse: He said that the Saudis often help the Pakistanis.

Twitter Outrage Takes Toronto, Canceling Two Pianists

Corrected on April 10, 2015

An earlier version of this story stated that the Toronto Symphony Orchestra official who both initially contacted pianist Stewart Goodyear about performing this week's concerts with the orchestra and then participated in a conversation with Goodyear and guest conductor Jukka-Pekka Saraste about canceling the Rachmaninoff Second Piano Concerto was TSO CEO Jeff Melanson. It was Loie Fallis, TSO vice president of artistic planning.

All Things Considered

The Navajo Nation's Tax On Junk Food Splits Reservation

Corrected on April 9, 2015

An earlier version of this article stated that Denisa Livingston said the tax will make people drive off the reservation. What she actually said was that people already drive off the reservation, and the Navajo nation is hoping the money generated from the tax will go toward farm initiatives, food storage, farmers markets on the Nation so they don't have to drive off the reservation.

Morning Edition

Doctors Test Tumor Paint In People

Corrected on April 8, 2015

In an earlier audio version of this report, we incorrectly stated that a dog named Sydney was being treated at the University of Washington veterinary school in Pullman. In fact, it is the Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine that is in Pullman.

All Things Considered

German Program Helps Families De-Radicalize Members Prone To Extremism

Corrected on April 8, 2015

During this interview we mistakenly say that Daniel Koehler started working at the EXIT program 15 years ago. In fact, he began working with the program in 2010. We also say that the Hayat program has "taken in some 1,600 calls and worked with 600 counseling cases." Those figures are Koehler's estimates for four organizations, not just the Muslim-focused Hayat program.

Diagnosing A Sinus Infection Can Be A DIY Project

Corrected on April 2, 2015

While the vast majority of acute sinusitis is viral, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation notes that on occasion significant complications can occur from bacterial sinusitis. Signs and symptoms such as worsening headaches, visual problems, changes in mental activity, facial swelling and progressive fever can indicate impending complications. If those are observed, the patient should seek medical care.

Morning Edition

What Happens To Kids Who've Been Under The Influence of Boko Haram?

Corrected on April 2, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous headline and Web introduction, we report that Cameroonian security forces say the children were being trained as child soldiers. We cannot confirm this. The children reportedly were rescued from a Quranic school where they were being indoctrinated.

All Things Considered

Supporters Work To Reclaim Legacy Of Penn State Coach Joe Paterno

Corrected on April 1, 2015

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, says that Joe Paterno won more games than any other college football coach. He actually won more than any other major college football coach.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Nigerian Artist Continues A Family Tradition With 'Sartorial Anarchy'

Corrected on March 31, 2015

The audio of this story, as did a previous version of the Web story, incorrectly states that Sheldon Museum of Art Director Wally Mason introduced the Duncans to Iké Udé. In fact, they were introduced by Mason's predecessor.

120 Years At Carnegie Hall

Corrected on March 26, 2015

An earlier photo caption stated that cellist Pablo Casals, violinist Fritz Kreisler, pianist Harold Bauer and conductor Walter Damrosch had been photographed in 1904. But Carnegie Hall Archives now says the photo was more likely taken in 1917.

Weekend Edition Sunday

For The Underdogs, Winning The NCAA Was Extra Sweet

Corrected on March 22, 2015

An earlier version of this story said that James Naismith invented basketball at the University of Kansas. He actually invented it in Springfield, Mass., and brought the game to KU six years later.

Morning Edition

Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.S.?

Corrected on March 19, 2015

This post was edited to clarify that Dr. Jeremy Greene only sometimes sees patients whose blood sugar is too high for glucometers to read. Also, recombinant DNA techniques were developed in the 1970s and used to make a human form of insulin that became popular during the 1980s. The original version of this post said the recombinant DNA tools were developed in the 1980s.

Clarification

March 27, 2015:

While it's true that the lack of generic insulin has hindered price competition for the diabetes medicine, some readers and listeners of our story pointed out that Wal-Mart pharmacies carry a house brand of insulin that costs about $25 a vial.

Morning Edition

Kentucky Right-To-Work Battle Shifts To Counties

Corrected on March 18, 2015

In previous audio and online versions of this story, we incorrectly said that Warren County's General Motors manufacturing plant is a closed shop, meaning that prospective employees must be union members before they're hired. In fact, it's a union shop, which means that employees must still join the union — but may do so after being hired.

All Things Considered

Movie Chains Balk At Netflix's Plan For Simultaneous Release

Corrected on March 18, 2015

In a previous Web version of this story, we incorrectly attributed this quote to Tim League: "We're agnostic. We're screen-agnostic. You know, a screen is a screen is a screen, whether it's in a theater, whether it's at home on your TV or whether it's your iPad. Where you want to consume is where you want to consume and we wanna make it available to you where it makes sense for you, but we also want to build our films in a way that suits them. It's not a one size fits all." It was actually said by Tom Quinn.

Lego Says You Can't Build That — Because Of Politics

Corrected on March 14, 2015

An earlier version of this story indicated that Weinstock submitted her design to Lego after receiving positive online feedback. Weinstock submitted the project to Lego, was rejected, and later received positive feedback online after distributing the images more widely.

Weekend Edition Saturday

From Freud To Possession, A Doctor Faces Psychiatry's Demons

Corrected on March 14, 2015

In an earlier audio version of this story, we incorrectly stated that Rush was the only physician to sign the Declaration of Independence. There were several doctors who signed.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Seven Decades On, Anne Frank's Words Still Comfort

Corrected on March 14, 2015

An earlier version of this story online and on air stated 6 million people died in the Holocaust. It is estimated that at least 11 million people were killed, 6 million of whom were Jewish.

Morning Edition

States Aim To Restrict Medically Induced Abortions

Corrected on March 11, 2015

An earlier version of this story stated incorrectly that Iowa's Board of Medicine had previously agreed the telemedicine program for medical abortion worked well. The board reviewed the program in 2010 and allowed it to continue until a new board ordered it stopped in 2013.

Morning Edition

More Snakes Added To U.S. Banned Species List

Corrected on March 10, 2015

In this story, we incorrectly state that new rules announced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service ban the sale of reticulated pythons and three other snake species. In fact, the rules ban importation and interstate sale and transport.

Eat Your Veggies! Even The Ones From Fukushima

Corrected on March 6, 2015

A previous version of this story incorrectly identified Ryoung Shin as a professor at RIKEN, in Tokyo. She is a researcher at the institute, which is located in Yokohama, Japan. The cesium used in the study was not radioactive, as previously stated.

Morning Edition

Immigrants Worry They'll Face Deportation After Deferred Action Delay

Corrected on March 4, 2015

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly said oral arguments for a lawsuit over the deferred action programs are scheduled to start in May at the federal appeals court in Washington, D.C. The arguments are actually part of a case that is unrelated to the ruling by the federal judge in Texas.

All Things Considered

Petraeus Agrees To Plead Guilty To Improperly Handling Classified Information

Corrected on March 3, 2015

A previous headline incorrectly said Gen. David Petraeus had pleaded guilty to improperly handling classified information, and previous audio and Web introductions implied the guilty plea. While Petraeus has agreed to plead guilty, he has not yet done so.

All Things Considered

U.S. Biologists Keen To Explore, Help Protect Cuba's Wild Places

Corrected on March 2, 2015

An earlier Web version of this story suggested that Cuba is home to 750 species of birds. That number should have been 371. Also, the accompanying radio story mislabels one bird song. The call in the story was not from a Cuban Vireo but instead from a Cuban Solitaire. You can hear the Cuban Vireo here.

Leonard Nimoy On Mr. Spock's Jewish Heritage

Corrected on February 28, 2015

An earlier version of this story stated Nimoy's parents were from Hungary. In interviews, Nimoy has stated his parents emigrated from the town of Zaslav in Ukraine.

All Things Considered

A Wrong Note Sets The Right Mood In 'House Of Cards'

Corrected on February 26, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version and photo caption, we refer to Frank Underwood as a congressman. The character was a congressman at the start of the series and has since become president.

All Things Considered

Jordan's Army Preps For A Bigger Role Against ISIS

Corrected on February 25, 2015

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified Omar Razzaz as Omar Raziz. Additionally, his name is mispronounced in the audio.

Morning Edition

Residents Fear Fighting In Ukraine Will Move To Kharkiv

Corrected on February 24, 2015

In this story, we incorrectly state that a bomb exploded two days ago at a march held by supporters of separation from Ukraine. In fact, the bomb exploded at a march held by supporters of a unified Ukraine.

Morning Edition

Army Corps Project Pits Farmland Against Flood Threat

Corrected on February 24, 2015

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly stated that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is fighting the New Madrid Floodway Project. The environmental group fighting the project is called the National Wildlife Federation. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has concerns about the project.

Morning Edition

Jury Selection To Begin Monday In Boston Marathon Bombing Trial

Corrected on February 23, 2015

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, says Zacarias Moussaoui pleaded guilty in exchange for life in prison. He did plead guilty, but the sentencing jury decided to give him life in prison rather than the death penalty.

All Things Considered

Modi's Fancy Pinstripe Suit Lands $694,000 At Auction

Corrected on February 20, 2015

The audio version of this story incorrectly states the amount of the winning bid for Narendra Modi's pinstripe suit as 40 million rupees, or about $642,000. It was 43.1 million rupees, or about $694,000.

Morning Edition

FEMA In Talks To Settle Sandy Flood Insurance Claims

Corrected on February 20, 2015

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the National Flood Insurance Program is taxpayer-funded. In fact, most of its funding comes from insurance premiums and fees — though the federal government does subsidize the program.

All Things Considered

Hospitals Fail To Protect Nursing Staff From Becoming Patients

Corrected on February 18, 2015

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, misstates Carla Luggiero's title. She is the senior associate director of federal relations and a lobbyist for the American Hospital Association, not the chief lobbyist.

All Things Considered

GMO Apples Get The Nod, But Not Much Of A Welcoming Party

Corrected on February 17, 2015

An earlier version of this story stated incorrectly that the FDA has already approved a potato that has been genetically modified in a similar way to the GMO apple. In fact, the FDA is still evaluating both the GMO apple and the potato.

Weekend Edition Sunday

The Week In Sports: NBA And WNBA Newsmakers

Corrected on February 11, 2015

Charlie Scott was not the first black player in the ACC, as is said during this interview. In fact, the University of Maryland's Billy Jones was the first.

All Things Considered

For Colorado's Undocumented, The Wait At The DMV Just Got Longer

Corrected on February 11, 2015

In the audio version of this story, as in an earlier Web version, we say that the adult children of Aleida Ramirez are sponsoring her for citizenship. In fact, they are sponsoring her for a green card.

All Things Considered

The 'Man Who Touched His Own Heart' Changed Medicine

Corrected on February 11, 2015

This piece states that Werner Forssmann was a medic during World War II. It would be more accurate to describe Forssmann as a medical officer. In 1939 he enlisted in the German armed forces. He eventually reached the rank of surgeon-major. In his autobiography, Forssmann describes his duties as being those of a field doctor — sometimes in hospitals associated with particular invasions, and in other cases stationed at hospitals to which the injured would be brought.

Plight Of Baby Lab Monkeys Reaches Congress

Corrected on February 5, 2015

An earlier version of this blog post said that a group of baby monkeys is in near-total isolation during the week and that their isolation is complete on weekends. To clarify, these particular baby monkeys are isolated from their mothers and housed in individual cages in one room. Dr. Amanda Dettmer at the Laboratory of Comparative Ethology at NIH says the cages are such that the monkeys "can see, hear, smell and touch other monkeys through their enclosures at all times." The monkeys spend two hours a day on weekdays playing with peers, are often in contact with researchers on weekdays, and are checked by researchers twice on weekends.

Morning Edition

In India, Catholic Church Attacks Spark Fears Of Intimidation

Corrected on February 3, 2015

In the audio version of this story, we incorrectly said that St. Alphonsa was the first Indian to be declared a saint. In fact, she was the first woman of Indian origin to be declared a saint.

All Things Considered

Economists Say Millennials Should Consider Careers In Trades

Corrected on February 3, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say that four-year college graduates are nearly twice as likely to have a job compared to Americans with a high school diploma. We should have said the unemployment rate is nearly twice as high for Americans with a high school diploma as it is for those with a four-year college degree or more.

How Unboiled Eggs Could Help Fight Food Waste

Corrected on February 3, 2015

The photo caption in an earlier version incorrectly identified University of California, Irvine undergraduate Steve Kudlacek as chemist Greg Weiss.

Morning Edition

Fight Parkinson's: Exercise May Be The Best Therapy

Corrected on February 3, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly identify the organization leading the 2012 study on exercise as the University of Oregon. It is the Oregon Research Institute.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Party Ban Is Patronizing, U.Va. Sorority Women Say

Corrected on February 2, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say that student Sara Surface believes progressive parties are quite safe. Surface in fact believes they are highly unsafe.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Amiri Baraka Didn't Worry About His Politics Overpowering His Poetry

Corrected on January 31, 2015

Previous audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly stated that Amiri Baraka joined the Black Panther Party in the 1960s. While he was a leader in the Black Power movement, he was not a member of the party.

Morning Edition

Former Democratic Sen. Jim Webb Explores Presidential Bid

Corrected on January 30, 2015

In the introduction to this interview, we refer to the Marine Corps Memorial and say it shows five Americans hoisting the flag over Iwo Jima. In fact, the U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial includes all six of the men — five Marines and a Navy corpsman — who raised the flag.

What Drives Abortion: The Law Or Income?

Corrected on January 30, 2015

A previous version of this story incorrectly identified one source. It is The Journal of Law and Economics, not The Law and Economics Journal.

All Things Considered

Buzz Bin: A Proper Look At Where Kazoos Come From

Corrected on January 29, 2015

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly states that one of the kazoo factories is located in northern New York state. In fact, the factory, which is in Eden, N.Y., is located in western New York.

Morning Edition

Tiger Skins And Rhino Horns: Can A Trade Deal Halt The Trafficking?

Corrected on January 28, 2015

The audio version of this story, as did an earlier Web version, refers to the National Wildlife Property Repository as the National Eagle and Wildlife Repository. The National Eagle Repository is a separate facility at the same site.

All Things Considered

It'd Be No 'Folly' To Remake This Musical Classic

Corrected on January 28, 2015

Michael Bennett was both choreographer and co-director of Follies. In an earlier Web version of this story, only Hal Prince was credited as director.

LOOK! The Asteroid That Flew Past Earth Tuesday Has Its Own Moon

Corrected on January 27, 2015

An earlier version of this post incorrectly said Monday's flyby is the closest a known asteroid of this size will pass by Earth in at least the next two centuries. In fact, it's the closest this particular asteroid will pass by Earth in that time; another asteroid of similar size is expected in 2027.

Morning Edition

Child Abuse And Neglect Laws Aren't Being Enforced, Report Finds

Corrected on January 27, 2015

Ron Zychowski with Eckerd, the nonprofit company that runs child welfare services in three Florida counties, says in this report that the family of a girl thrown off a bridge was not in the county child welfare system. There are reports that child welfare investigators had visited the family previously. But according to officials at Eckerd, the company had no active case involving the family.

All Things Considered

Paris Attacks Refocus Attention On Homegrown Terrorist Threats

Corrected on January 27, 2015

Our interview subject incorrectly says that Khaled Kelkal was the terrorist responsible for a 1982 attack at a Jewish restaurant in Paris. In fact, police linked that attack to the Abu Nidal Organization. Khaled Kelkal was affiliated with a French-Algerian terrorist group known as the GIA. The GIA claimed responsibility for a series of bombings in France in the summer and fall of 1995. Police said that Kelkal's fingerprints were found on an unexploded bomb and he was killed when they tried to arrest him in Lyon that same year.

Argentina's President Dissolves Intelligence Agency, Citing Prosecutor's Death

Corrected on January 26, 2015

An earlier version of this post said authorities were trying to determine where the gun that killed Nisman came from. An associate of Nisman's has said he gave him the gun. The earlier version also said testimony by a locksmith that Nisman's door was unlocked undermined the theory of suicide. The testimony was later disputed by Nisman's mother, who has said she partially unlocked the door before the locksmith arrived.

All Things Considered

UVA Sororities Push To Host Their Own Parties

Corrected on January 26, 2015

A previous Web introduction to this story incorrectly identified the sorority Kappa Alpha Theta as Kappa Alpha Beta.

Morning Edition

Measles Outbreak At Disneyland Spreads To Other States

Corrected on January 22, 2015

We say the measles vaccine causes no problematic side effects. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, most children do not have any side effects from the shot. The side effects that do occur are usually very mild, such as a fever or rash. More serious side effects are rare. These may include high fever that could cause a seizure.

Morning Edition

Scandium Middleman Is A Rare Guy Selling A Rare Element

Corrected on January 21, 2015

In this report, scandium is referred to "as one of the lanthanides." In fact, it is not a lanthanide. But scandium is often grouped with the lanthanides as one of the rare earth elements.

After Saying Yes, Duke Nixes Muslim Call To Prayer From Chapel Bell Tower

Corrected on January 15, 2015

A previous version of this story said that traditional Muslim prayers held each Friday at Duke would be moved to a quadrangle outside the campus chapel. The call to prayer will be moved there, but the services themselves will continue to be held in the chapel basement.

Morning Edition

Free-Climbers Reach Summit Of Yosemite's El Capitan

Corrected on January 15, 2015

In a previous audio version of this report, we said no one had ever free-climbed El Capitan. In fact, El Capitan has been free-climbed many times. But until this week, no one had free-climbed El Capitan's Dawn Wall on the way to the summit.

All Things Considered

Mae Keane, One Of The Last 'Radium Girls,' Dies At 107

Corrected on January 15, 2015

In the audio of this story, as in a previous headline and Web version of the text, we say Mae Keane was the last of the "radium girls." We were relying on the work of scholars who have studied what happened to the young women who worked in wristwatch factories. After the story aired, we received word that 104-year-old Mabel Williams, who lives in Olympia, Wash., worked in one of the factories when she was a young woman. A commenter below also says that other "radium girls" may still be alive.

Morning Edition

Harris Opens Bid For Boxer's Senate Seat, But Others May Follow

Corrected on January 14, 2015

We say that former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa could become "California's first Latino Senate candidate." In 2004, former Treasurer of the United States Rosario Marin ran for the Senate but finished second in California's Republican primary. She was the state's first Latina candidate for the Senate.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Satire In The Muslim World: A Centuries-Long Tradition

Corrected on January 14, 2015

The audio of this story incorrectly states that Azhar Usman is from India. In fact, Usman's family is from India. He was born and raised in the U.S.

Morning Edition

North Carolina Rethinks The Common Core

Corrected on January 14, 2015

Previous audio and Web versions of this story stated that Jeannie Metcalf is a school board member from Salem, N.C. In fact, she is from Winston-Salem, N.C.

All Things Considered

Anti-Immigrant Rally Draws Thousands In Dresden

Corrected on January 13, 2015

Some readers have pointed out that the slogan "We are the People!" mentioned in this story was made famous by pro-democracy demonstrators in Leipzig, the birthplace of East Germany's peaceful revolution against the communist government of the time. PEGIDA supporters use the slogan because they feel the Berlin government today is ignoring their views just like the communists did then.

Our correspondent says she should have included that information but that it was important to point out the phrase is also associated with Nazi propaganda from the 1930s — specifically a phrase used by philosopher Martin Heidegger. Given the demands by protesters that non-ethnic Germans there assimilate or be banned from Germany altogether, opponents of PEGIDA have criticized its appropriation of the "We are the People!" phrase.

Morning Edition

Supreme Court Sees The Signs — But Can They Stay?

Corrected on January 12, 2015

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, describes the limit on the size of directional event signs in Gilbert, Ariz., as 6 feet square. In fact, it's 6 square feet.

All Things Considered

First Amendment Arguments Overshadow Sterling Espionage Case

Corrected on January 12, 2015

In a previous version of this story, we inaccurately characterized the government allegations about what material Jeffrey Sterling may have leaked. In fact, the prosecution argues Sterling told a reporter about a botched operation to target Iran's nuclear capabilities, as we accurately reported in later versions. Additionally, the original version of the transcript contained that same error.

5 Years After Haiti's Earthquake, Where Did The $13.5 Billion Go?

Corrected on January 12, 2015

A previous version of this story incorrectly dated the earthquake as being on Jan. 10, 2010. It was actually Jan. 12, 2010. Additionally, the Government Accountability Office was misidentified as the Government Accounting Office.

Morning Edition

Lobbyists Adjust To GOP Majority On Capitol Hill

Corrected on January 12, 2015

In a previous audio version of this story, Robert Bennett was identified as a former senator from Idaho. In fact, Bennett represented Utah. Also, control of the House did not shift to Republicans after the 1980 election, as we originally stated; Democrats still held the majority.

Meet The Classroom Of The Future

Corrected on January 12, 2015

A previous version of this story misidentified the school where Aaron Kaswell teaches as M.S. 33. He actually teaches at M.S. 88. Additionally, we incorrectly said that teachers receive schedules 12 hours in advance, when it's 16 hours, and that lessons at I.S. 228, which are 35 minutes long, are 25 minutes long.

Allergists Urge Use Of Epinephrine For Allergy Emergencies

Corrected on January 12, 2015

An earlier version of this story failed to note that one study on epinephrine use was done in Germany. Our story also did not cite research finding that epinephrine is used appropriately in emergency departments in the United States.

All Things Considered

When It Comes To Smartphones, Are Americans Dumb?

Corrected on January 8, 2015

In the audio of this story, we say carmaker Lamborghini was displaying a $6,000 smartphone at the International Consumer Electronics Show; a previous Web version implied the same thing. In fact, it's the son of the carmaker's founder who is selling the phone. He got permission to use his dad's famous logo.

All Things Considered

Former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo Dead At 82

Corrected on January 8, 2015

In the audio version of this story, we mistakenly call Mario Cuomo, the former New York governor who died, Andrew. (His son Andrew Cuomo is New York's current governor.)

Morning Edition

The Russian Who Claims Credit For Fanning The Flames In Ukraine

Corrected on January 8, 2015

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, refers to a photo of Igor Girkin wearing an orange-and-black striped suit, colors that symbolize Russian patriotism. While the photo was genuine, the suit was digitally added to Girkin.

The Man Behind Common Core Math

Corrected on January 5, 2015

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Phil Daro was involved in the writing of California's current math standards. Daro was involved in an earlier standards effort in that state.

Weekend Edition Sunday

A Winter Puzzle To Brrring In The New Year

Corrected on January 4, 2015

In a previous version of this page we posted the wrong on-air challenge. The correct on-air challenge for the week is posted above.

All Things Considered

Net Neutrality Debate Forces FCC Chairman Into The Spotlight

Corrected on January 2, 2015

We incorrectly characterize the position of Netflix and Amazon on the issue of net neutrality. Netflix and Amazon do not support paid prioritization and have previously registered their opposition with the FCC.

All Things Considered

Brazilian President Begins New Term With Tough Road Ahead

Corrected on January 2, 2015

We mistakenly refer to Vice President Biden as President Biden, and then our guest makes the same mistake. Additionally, the original transcript incorrectly inserted the title vice where it had not been used.