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The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform's top Democrat, Rep. Elijah Cummings seen here in 2017, co-signed a letter requesting a subpoena for documents about the 2020 census citizenship question from the Census Bureau and Commerce Department, which oversees the census. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Democrats Push For Internal Documents On 2020 Census Citizenship Question

More lawmakers are calling for a subpoena to force the Census Bureau and Commerce Department to release documents about the controversial citizenship question before an upcoming hearing.

Steelworkers leave a plant at the end of their shift in Bethlehem, Pa. in 1947. Employment in the industry has declined by 80 percent from its peak 6 decades ago, according to author Douglas Irwin. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Protection For The Steel Industry Is As Old As America

The U.S. steel industry has enjoyed protection from foreign competitors since the 1790s. It says new import tariffs are actually just leveling the playing field and shouldn't be labeled "protection."

Republican Debbie Lesko resigned her state Senate seat to run for Congress in Arizona's conservative 8th Congressional District, where she's hoping to defend generally safe GOP turf. Bret Jaspers/KJZZ hide caption

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Bret Jaspers/KJZZ

Republicans Look To Avoid Upset In Arizona Special Election

KJZZ

In a conservative congressional district outside of Phoenix, national Republicans have spent about $1 million to protect the seat vacated by former GOP Rep. Trent Franks, who resigned in December.

A woman poses for a smartphone photo at a booth for Chinese tech firm Tencent at the Global Mobile Internet Conference (GMIC) in Beijing, last year. Tencent was one of a number of tech companies singled out in a new report on gender discrimination in China. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Chinese Women Face Rampant Gender Discrimination From Employers, Report Says

Human Rights Watch says 19 percent of job advertisements in 2018 were designated "men only." Meanwhile, several tech companies feature young female employees in ads to attract male counterparts.

Police tape blocks off a Waffle House restaurant on Sunday in Nashville, Tenn. At least four people died after a gunman opened fire at the restaurant early Sunday. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

Waffle House Shooting Underscores How Gun Laws Vary From State To State

Nashville Public Radio

Travis Reinking's guns were seized in Illinois, but he may have broken no laws by having those guns — including an AR-15 — when he moved to Tennessee late last year.

An ethernet cable connects a router device inside a communications room at an office in London on May 15, 2017. Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sounding The Alarm About A New Russian Cyber Threat

The U.S. and U.K. governments say Russia is targeting infrastructure in the West with cyberattacks. Department of Homeland Security cybersecurity chief Jeanette Manfra explains.

Sounding The Alarm About A New Russian Cyber Threat

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Former Central Intelligence Agency Director Gen. Michael Hayden, who served under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, has come out against the Trump travel ban. David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images hide caption

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David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images

Why Dozens Of National-Security Experts Have Come Out Against Trump's Travel Ban

The Supreme Court hears arguments on the ban Wednesday, and a bipartisan group of former national-security officials from the Reagan to Obama administrations are urging the court to strike it down.

Herbert Diess, Volkswagen's new CEO addresses, the media during a news conference at the company's plant in Wolfsburg, Germany, April 13. As the company turns the page from its diesel emissions cheating scandal, it says its future is electric. Fabian Bimmer/Reuters hide caption

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Fabian Bimmer/Reuters

After Diesel Scandal, VW Turns To New Leadership And Electric Cars

The German auto giant has a new top management and a new focus. The diesel scandal helped drive VW toward investing in electric cars, but other major automakers are betting on a plug-in future too.

After Diesel Scandal, VW Turns To New Leadership And Electric Cars

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A man rides a LimeBike in Washington, DC. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

#ScootersBehavingBadly: U.S. Cities Race To Keep Up With Small Vehicle Shares

Cities like San Francisco and Austin are struggling to regulate a flood of new transportation options, from electric scooters to dock-less bikes. Residents are angry over sidewalk and safety concerns.

#ScootersBehavingBadly: U.S. Cities Race To Keep Up With Small Vehicle Shares

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The U.S. Army's Autonomous Remote Engagement System is mounted on the Picatinny Lightweight Remote Weapon System and coupled with an M240B machine gun. It's part of a program that reduces the time to identify targets using automatic target detection and user-specified target selection. U.S. Army hide caption

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U.S. Army

Autonomous Weapons Would Take Warfare To A New Domain, Without Humans

Former special operations agent Paul Scharre helped create U.S. military guidelines on autonomous weapons. His new book Army of None, looks at the advances in technology, and the questions they raise.

Autonomous Weapons Would Take Warfare To A New Domain, Without Humans

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Under sweeping new recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, doctors would see new mothers sooner and more frequently, and insurers would cover the increased visits. FatCamera/Getty Images hide caption

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FatCamera/Getty Images

Ob-Gyns Urged to See New Mothers Sooner And More Often

ProPublica

Sweeping changes in medical practice could improve the dismal U.S. rate of maternal deaths and near-deaths, an influential doctors' group says.

An installation displays paperwork required for refugees to travel between Germany and the United States. The paperwork, which includes passports, affidavits, birth certificates, tax clearances and more, still didn't guarantee entry to the U.S. and often resulted in years-long waiting lists. Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

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Eslah Attar/NPR

As American Awareness Fades, Holocaust Museum Refreshes The Story

A new exhibit at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum contextualizes American action — and inaction — during the Nazi rise to power. A 96-year-old Holocaust survivor says it's about time.

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