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Town worker Steve Crowley washes and disinfects the public restroom at Mayflower beach, in Dennis, Mass., last week. As stay-at-home restrictions are lifting, many people are concerned about using public restrooms. John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Fear Of Public Restrooms Prompts Creative Solutions As Some Businesses Reopen

Some people are afraid to use potentially germ-filled public restrooms as stay-at-home restrictions begin lifting. That's boosting sales of products that offer creative alternatives.

Justice Buress, 4, hides under a table while demonstrating a drill at Little Explorers Learning Center in St. Louis. Tess Trice, head of the day care program, carries out monthly drills to train the children to get on the floor when they hear gunfire. Carolina Hidalgo/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Carolina Hidalgo/St. Louis Public Radio

Teaching Kids To Hide From Gunfire: Safety Drills At Day Care And At Home

Kaiser Health News

Sheltering in place isn't new for children who live in neighborhoods plagued by gun violence, and shootings haven't eased during the pandemic. St. Louis families improvise to keep kids safe.

Teaching Kids To Hide From Gunfire: Safety Drills At Day Care And At Home

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In parts of Virginia, West Virginia and North Carolina, cicadas will climb out of the ground for their once-in-17-year mating cycle. Scientists have dubbed this grouping brood IX. Stephen Jaffe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Jaffe/AFP via Getty Images

They're Back: Millions Of Cicadas Expected To Emerge This Year

In parts of Virginia, West Virginia and North Carolina, the insects will climb out of the ground for their once-in-17-year mating cycle. Scientists have dubbed this grouping brood IX.

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., attends a press conference on Feb. 26 on Capitol Hill. Omar tells NPR the progressive left "has moved the needle on the national conversation" surrounding certain policies. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Ilhan Omar On Her Memoir And Moving The Needle Toward Progressive Policies

Rep. Ilhan Omar has a new memoir about her journey to Congress after fleeing civil war in Somalia. She talked with NPR about her life and her hopes for future coronavirus relief measures.

Ilhan Omar On Her Memoir And Moving The Needle Toward Progressive Policies

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VIDEOS: The Formula

NPR Music digs deep with the launch of a new video series designed to canonize the producers behind classics, old and new, that unearth hip-hop's musical D.N.A.

Noah Cyrus' new EP The End of Everything incorporates contemporary pop, country, the gospel music of her grandfather and is inspired by a YouTube video about the end of the universe. Brian Ziff/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Brian Ziff/Courtesy of the artist

Noah Cyrus On Growing Up In Public And 'The End Of Everything'

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to the singer-songwriter about stepping out from under her family's shadow, the end of the universe and the influence of her grandfather's gospel music on her songs.

Noah Cyrus On Growing Up In Public And 'The End Of Everything'

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Sharon Horgan (left) and Kristin Scott Thomas play the spouses of soldiers who lead a choir group of women to success, in the new based-on-a-true story film, Military Wives. Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images hide caption

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Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images

'The Power Of A Group' Moves Sharon Horgan, Kristin Scott Thomas In 'Military Wives'

The film follows women who form a choir to cope with their spouses' deployments to Afghanistan. "It's a story that speaks to a huge number of partners, spouses and wives of the military," Horgan says.

Sharon Horgan And Kristin Scott Thomas' 'Military Wives' Out On Hulu

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President Trump is visiting one of his golf course this weekend, his first apparent golf outing since declaring a state of emergency due to the coronavirus pandemic. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Trump Returns To Golf Course For 1st Time Since March

The president visited his Virginia resort Saturday. It appears that Trump — whose time on the links has been criticized ⁠— hasn't played a round since declaring a national emergency in March.

Liege Camila Pistore Veras, Rafael Duckur, and Joana Luiza Mendes (left to right) load boxes of produce into a truck at a farm outside of Sao Paulo, Brazil. This produce, and more, will be distributed in favelas, poor urban neighborhoods where residents live in crowded homes and lack basic sanitation. Patrícia Monteiro for NPR hide caption

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Patrícia Monteiro for NPR

PHOTOS: Brazilian Farmers Hatch A Plan To Send Healthy Food To The Favelas

A stay-at-home order has meant a loss of income for many of the working poor — and the fear that they won't be able to feed their families. Then a group of organic farmers had an idea.

Downtown Houston, Texas in 2019. Loren Elliott/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Loren Elliott/AFP via Getty Images

With Moratorium Lifted, Houston Becomes Largest U.S. City Where Evictions Can Resume

Houston Public Media News 88.7

Some Texas cities are taking additional steps to protect renters and delay evictions, but many Texans remain vulnerable. A Houston rental assistance program ran out of funding in just 90 minutes.

With Moratorium Lifted, Houston Becomes Largest U.S. City Where Evictions Can Resume

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Former Vice President Joe Biden, pictured on March 12, is facing backlash for comments that his campaign says were a joke about black support for him versus President Trump. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Pulls Back On 'Cavalier' Remarks About Black Voters

In an at-times tense exchange on the radio show Breakfast Club, former Vice President Joe Biden said, "If you have a problem figuring out whether you're for me or Trump, then you ain't black."

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a news conference in Tel Aviv last September. Netanyahu, the country's longest-serving prime minister, will go to court on Sunday charged with bribery, fraud and breach of trust. Oded Balilty/AP hide caption

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Oded Balilty/AP

What To Know As Israel's Netanyahu Goes On Trial For Corruption Charges

The Israeli prime minister is due in court Sunday for corruption charges, including that he allegedly offered a media company regulatory favors for positive coverage.

Hairstylists are not considered essential workers, which has left many of them without an income during the coronavirus shutdown. But hair continues to grow, even during stay-at-home orders. Chava Sanchez/KPCC hide caption

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Chava Sanchez/KPCC

Latest Style Trend: Clandestine Haircuts During Stay-At-Home Orders

KPCC

Hairstylists are not considered essential workers. But hair continues to grow. That's led to clandestine haircuts, where stylists can make money and clients can get a much-needed trim.

People relax in the sun while practicing social distancing last weekend in New York City's Domino Park. On Friday night, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued an order loosening some of the state's coronavirus restrictions. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Under Legal Pressure, New York Relaxes Restrictions On More Gatherings

The state first allowed gatherings of up to 10 people at religious services and Memorial Day events. Just hours after a lawsuit was filed, though, New York modified the order to include everyone.

Dr. Jonas Salk, the scientist who created the polio vaccine, administers an injection to an unidentified boy at Arsenal Elementary School in Pittsburgh, Pa., in 1954. AP hide caption

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AP

The Race For A Polio Vaccine Differed From The Quest To Prevent Coronavirus

In the 1950s, as Dr. Jonas Salk and virologist Albert Sabin worked to create a vaccine to prevent infantile paralysis, the threat from polio was already long familiar to Americans.

The Race For A Polio Vaccine Differed From The Quest To Prevent Coronavirus

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