More About the Show Invisibilia is created by a small, but mighty, team of all women! Learn more about the people who make the show:
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More About the Show

Invisibilia launched in January 2015 and the podcast quickly climbed the ranks to number one on the iTunes top chart. Excerpts of the show are featured on the NPR News programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Invisibilia also creates short videos on the psychological and social science from the stories, available on NPR's YouTube channel and publishes articles and interviews on NPR.org.


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Alix Spiegel

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Alix Spiegel co-hosts NPR's Invisibilia, a podcast from NPR about the unseen forces that control human behavior - our ideas, beliefs, assumptions and thoughts. Invisibilia interweaves personal stories with fascinating psychological and brain science, in a way that ultimately makes you see your own life differently.

Before launching Invisibilia with NPR Science Reporter Lulu Miller in 2015, Alix worked on NPR's Science Desk for 10 years covering psychology and human behavior. She has reported on everything from what it's like to kill another person, to the psychology behind our use of function words like "and", "I", and "so."

She began her career in radio in 1995 as one of the founding producers of This American Life. While there, Alix produced her first psychology story, which ultimately led to her focus on human behavior. It was a piece called 81 Words, and it examined the history behind the removal of homosexuality from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

Over the course of her career, Alix has won many awards including a George Foster Peabody Award, a Livingston Award, an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award, a Scripps Howard National Journalism Award, and a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award.

Originally from Baltimore, Maryland, Alix graduated from Oberlin College. Her work on human behavior has also appeared in The New Yorker magazine and The New York Times.

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Hanna Rosin

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Hanna Rosin co-hosts Invisibilia with Alix Spiegel. Hanna comes to NPR from the world of print magazines. Most recently she was a national correspondent for The Atlantic, where she wrote cover stories about various corners of American culture. Her favorite stories are dark but reveal something humane about the way we live now, "The Craigslist Murders," "The Overprotected Kid," and "The Suicides in Silicon Valley." She is a longtime writer for Slate and host of the DoubleX Gabfest. She has been on the Daily Show and the Colbert Show when they were both shows and so fun to be on. Hanna has headlined a TED conference and was part of a team at New York Magazine that won a National Magazine Award for a series of stories on circumcision. She is also the author of two books, including the End of Men. She likes men, though, and she really likes learning radio from her fellow Invisibilia hosts.

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Cara Tallo

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Cara Tallo is the Executive Producer of Invisibilia at NPR. In this role, she oversees the team reporting and works to develop digital and broadcast opportunities for the award-winning program.

Cara has been with NPR for nearly two decades. She most recently served as Deputy Executive Producer of Morning Edition, where she coordinated story assignments - and many other things - for the 24-hour staff.

Cara started at NPR as an intern for the National Desk. Over the course of her career, she has directed live breaking coverage, field produced from Fort Worth to Fallujah, and launched NPR's first morning news podcast, Up First.

She's won the Overseas Press Club's Lowell Thomas Award for producing the series "The Mid-East: A Century of Conflict" and the National Association of Black Journalists' Salute to Excellence Award for her work producing Juan Williams' "March on Washington" series.

Cara got her start in radio at WSBG/WVPO where she learned to write copy, anchor newscasts, and function effectively at all hours of the day and night. She received a B.A. in Political Science and a B.S. in Communication from Houghton College in Houghton, NY.

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Yowei Shaw

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Yowei Shaw is senior reporter/producer at Invisibilia, where she reports, produces, edits, and sound designs stories. Her work on the show has taken listeners into an unlikely love story in martial law era Taiwan, a Midwestern community sharply divided in how it sees wild black bears, and a hardcore music scene that called out one of its own.

Before joining the team, she was a USA Knight Fellow, whose work has been featured on This American Life, Pop Up Magazine, Studio 360, and The World, among other places. At one point, she produced interviews at NPR's Fresh Air and once made really good elevator music in Chinatown, Philadelphia.

Yowei got her start in radio by teaching youth media, when she was a young person herself. She is ever grateful to her parents for letting her report on their obsession with tango dancing. They were very perplexed when she won a Third Coast documentary award for the story.

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Abby Wendle

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Abby Wendle is a producer for NPR's Invisibilia. She's been a farm reporter for Harvest Public Media in rural Illinois and helped launch This Land Radio in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Her work has appeared on NPR News, the BBC, CBC, and ABC in Australia, and has received awards from The Missouri Review, The Third Coast International Audio Festival, and KCRW's 24 Hour Radio Race. She once won Best Sports Report from PRNDI for a story about competitive corn husking. In addition to reporting on it, Abby competed – snapping off and shucking 216 ears in 20 minutes and getting one heck of a rash. Here's proof. Abby also enjoys creating experimental sound art. Her project, ~1652Hz (the howling dome), is a collaborative sonic experience in which people are invited to make noises they associate with a pain or grievance in their life. She has two cats and hopes to garden and weld more in the future.

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Liana Simstrom

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Liana Simstrom had a roundabout introduction to the world of podcasting. Before coming to NPR, she worked as an event planner for the Campaign to Fix the Debt, The New America Foundation, and the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Liana joined the Invisibilia team in the beginning of 2016 as the project associate for Season 2. In that role, she coordinated logistics for the launch of the second season and managed all listener engagement. For Season 3 of the show, she took on a new role as showrunner, creating and maintaining the production calendar, managing staff and assigning tasks, and coordinating within NPR to ensure Invisibilia is meeting both its editorial and financial goals. In her most recent role, Liana serves as the project manager, primarily focusing on audience engagement, business development, and cross-platform initiatives. She's originally from Minneapolis and graduated with a B.A. from Mount Holyoke College.


Anne Gudenkauf is the editor of NPR's Invisibilia podcast. Before joining NPR, Gudenkauf was a reporter-producer at WOSU AM/FM in Columbus, Ohio. She graduated from The Ohio State University with a bachelor's degree in journalism.

From 1980 to 2017, Gudenkauf led NPR's Science Desk and grew it from a three-person unit to a team of 35. NPR's science reporting has been awarded both broadcast and online journalism prizes, including the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award, the George Foster Peabody Award, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, The National Academies Keck Awards, the White House News Photographers Association, Editor & Publisher EPpy Awards.

In 2014-15, Gudenkauf helped develop and launch Invisibilia with co-creators Alix Spiegel and Lulu Miller. As the idea of long form narratives rooted in science came to Alix and Lulu, Anne helped shape them and bring them to radio, podcast and digital audiences.


Lulu Miller is the cofounder of Invisibilia. She has been working in public radio for over 13 years and over that time has won honors from the Peabody Awards, The National Academy of Science, and even a twitter mention from L.L Cool J! Before working with the wondrous ladies of Invisibilia, she was a producer and reporter at Radiolab. Her radio work focuses on stories about mental health, disability, and nature. Her written work has been published in the New Yorker, VQR, Catapult and beyond. Her nonfiction book, Why Fish Don't Exist, is forthcoming from Simon & Schuster in 2020.