Jazz Jazz and blues music performances and features from NPR news, NPR cultural programs, and NPR Music stations.

Jazz

The International Sweethearts of Rhythm in the 1940s. Courtesy of Rosalind Cron hide caption

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Courtesy of Rosalind Cron

The All-Female Big Bands That Made History During World War II

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After facing a calamitous scandal that cast doubt on its very future, the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra has returned with new leadership and a new album, featuring songs by its city's patron saint of rebirth, Allen Toussaint. Katie Sikora/courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Katie Sikora/courtesy of the artist

Mardi Gras Indian Big Chief Monk Boudreaux (right) and members of his Golden Eagles tribe in March 2019 in New Orleans. Erika Goldring/Getty Images hide caption

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Erika Goldring/Getty Images

In New Orleans, 'Indian Red' Is The Anthemic Sound Of Tradition

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The members of SOL Development (Left to right): Brittany Tanner, Felicia Gangloff-Bailey, Karega Bailey and Lauren Adams. Brian Freeman /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Brian Freeman /Courtesy of the artist

Oakland Collective SOL Development Preserves The 'The SOL Of Black Folk'

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Nat King Cole plays with his jazz orchestra on the stage of The Apollo Theater, in Harlem, N.Y. in the 1950s. Eric Schwab/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Schwab/AFP/Getty Images

Nat King Cole Still Remains 'One Of The Great Gifts Of Nature' 100 Years Later

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Kamasi Washington Durimel Full/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Durimel Full/Courtesy of the artist

Kamasi Washington On World Cafe

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Duke Ellington at the piano, circa 1940. John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images hide caption

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John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images

A Sprawling Blueprint For Protest Music, Courtesy Of The Jazz Duke

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"I probably almost broke down a few times questioning whether or not I was gonna be able to get it done," Pianist Kris Bowers says of learning Don Shirley's music for Green Book. Molly Cranna/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Molly Cranna/Courtesy of the artist

How Pianist Kris Bowers Found His Inner Virtuoso For Oscar-Nominated 'Green Book'

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Bassist Christian McBride (left) and Blues artist Joey DeFrancesco (right). Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

A Reunion Of Brotherly Love: Joey DeFrancesco Traces His Roots

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