It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders A talk show with a heart. Each week, Sam interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.
It's been a minute with Sam Sanders.
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It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

From NPR

A talk show with a heart. Each week, Sam interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.

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A person uses a smart phone in Chicago on Sept. 16, 2017. Former Google tech design ethicist Tristan Harris says tech addiction is leading to 'human downgrading.' AP hide caption

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AP

How Tech Hijacks Our Brains, Corrupts Culture, And What To Do Now

NPR's Elise Hu steps in for Sam and sits down with Tristan Harris, a former design ethicist for Google, while listeners share their tech burnout stories and solutions. We also hear from WIRED senior writer Nitasha Tiku on what regulation is happening in the tech industry right now.

How Tech Hijacks Our Brains, Corrupts Culture, And What To Do Now

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Netta Barzilai performs live on stage during the 64th annual Eurovision Song Contest held at Tel Aviv Fairgrounds. Michael Campanella/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Campanella/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Eurovision Takes The Stage, Plus China Tariffs, Abortion Restrictions

The U.S. this week expanded its tariffs on products from China to include items such as toys and sneakers. What will that mean for consumers? Alabama joined the list of states moving to impose restrictions on abortion. Plus, the glitter-infused, 42-country singing competition known as Eurovision is about to take the stage. Which country's song will take the cake? WBUR reporter Zeninjor Enwemeka and 'Endless Thread' podcast co-host Ben Brock Johnson join Sam in Boston.

Weekly Wrap: Eurovision Takes The Stage, Plus China Tariffs, Abortion Restrictions

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Brooke (Heléne Yorke) and Cary (Drew Tarver) star in The Other Two, written and created by Sarah Schneider and Chris Kelly. John Pack/Comedy Central hide caption

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John Pack/Comedy Central

'SNL' And 'The Other Two' Writers Sarah Schneider and Chris Kelly

'SNL' season 42 started before the 2016 election and ended months after Donald Trump's inauguration. During that whirlwind year, the show was steered by co-head writers Sarah Schneider and Chris Kelly. After it, they created and wrote 'The Other Two' for Comedy Central, hailed by critics as one of 2019's best new comedies. It was recently renewed for a second season. Email the show at samsanders@npr.org.

'SNL' And 'The Other Two' Writers Sarah Schneider and Chris Kelly

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Sam Sanders speaks to the audience at an It's Been a Minute live show in Des Moines, Iowa, on May 9, 2019. Joanna Pawlowska/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Pawlowska/NPR

Weekly Wrap: 2020 Politics And More, Live From Des Moines, Iowa

For this special live edition of the show, Sam is joined by NPR national correspondent Sarah McCammon and Iowa Public Radio host and reporter Clay Masters. To Sam, it seems the Democratic Party is running two different primaries: one for their progressive base and another for hypothetical moderate general election voters. Plus how are Iowans feeling about 2020?

Weekly Wrap: 2020 Politics And More, Live From Des Moines, Iowa

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A woman enters the The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away room during a preview of the Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirrors exhibit. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

Instagram Is Reshaping How We Interact With Art And How Artists Create It

The social media app Instagram is plastered with artwork, ranging from selfies inside Yayoi Kusama's mirrored rooms, to snapshots of the iconic "Mona Lisa" to short poems and colorful, inspirational messages. But how does the app affect how we engage with all these works — and how makers and museums create and share it? We talked with artists, curators and critics for a look at art in the age of Instagram.

Instagram Is Reshaping How We Interact With Art And How Artists Create It

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The Impossible Burger is a plant-based vegan burger designed to taste like real beef. ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: A Meatless Moment, How To Combat Homelessness, Containing The Measles

Cases of measles have cropped up in almost two dozen states, and health experts are working to contain the disease. In San Francisco, a drama is unfolding between city officials, billionaires and residents on how to fight homelessness. Plus, are meatless burgers having a moment? Sam is joined by KPCC health care reporter Michelle Faust Raghavan and L.A. Times national correspondent Matt Pearce.

Weekly Wrap: A Meatless Moment, How To Combat Homelessness, Containing The Measles

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Shane's debut comedy album is called Established 1981. Shane Torres hide caption

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Shane Torres

Comedian Shane Torres On Guy Fieri And Life On The Road

Shane's career caught fire when he famously defended Guy Fieri (and his shirt flames) in a bit on 'Conan.' Now, he talks to Sam about life on the road, why political comedy is hard, and their shared Texas roots. Shane's debut comedy album is called 'Established 1981.' Email the show at samsanders@npr.org

Comedian Shane Torres On Guy Fieri And Life On The Road

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A festivalgoer wears Balenciaga sneakers during the 2019 Coachella Valley Music And Arts Festival. Brands such as Balenciaga have brought chunky sneakers, such as their Triple S model, into the world of high fashion. Presley Ann/Getty Images for Coachella hide caption

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Presley Ann/Getty Images for Coachella

Weekly Wrap: Transgender Military Ban, Chunky 'Dad' Sneakers, Plus Who Uses Twitter?

The Trump administration's ban on transgender people serving openly in the military is in effect, but how is it being felt? A new Pew study dives into who actually uses the social network Twitter. Plus, Sam calls up a fashion critic to find out why big, chunky sneakers made a comeback — particularly in the world of high fashion. Sam is joined this week by KUT reporter Ashley Lopez and Dallas Morning News reporter Lauren McGaughy.

Weekly Wrap: Transgender Military Ban, Chunky 'Dad' Sneakers, Plus Who Uses Twitter?

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Kathy Griffin at SXSW on March 11, 2019 in Austin, Texas, where she screened her new film, 'Kathy Griffin: A Hell of A Story.' Robin Marchant/Getty Images for Twitter hide caption

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Robin Marchant/Getty Images for Twitter

Kathy Griffin's Life On the Blacklist

Kathy Griffin isn't ashamed of being a comic who spills the tea. That's what she tells Sam she does — whether she's calling out celebrities like the Kardashians or taking photos with a bloody Donald Trump mask. Griffin is out with a new feature all about how her life changed after publishing that photo. It's called 'Kathy Griffin: A Hell of A Story.'

Kathy Griffin's Life On the Blacklist

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A redacted version of the report on special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 elections was released this week. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: The Mueller Report, Notre Dame, 2020 Fundraising

The U.S. Department of Justice released a redacted version of Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. Where do things stand now that it's out? After a massive fire destroyed portions of the centuries-old Notre Dame cathedral in Paris, billions of dollars have already been pledged to rebuild it. Plus, what does a historically black, all-male college's decision to begin accepting transgender men signal about cultural attitudes toward gender? Sam is joined this week by NPR lead political editor Domenico Montanaro and Associated Press national political reporter Juana Summers.

Weekly Wrap: The Mueller Report, Notre Dame, 2020 Fundraising

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