It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders A talk show with a heart. Each week, Sam interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.
It's been a minute with Sam Sanders.
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It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

From NPR

A talk show with a heart. Each week, Sam interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.

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Emily King's new album is called Scenery. Bao Ngo/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Bao Ngo/Courtesy of the artist

Emily King's Change Of 'Scenery'

It's Tuesday. Sam talks to musician Emily King about her new album, 'Scenery,' hailed by our NPR Music colleagues as "a precise-yet-fluid blend of '80s pop and rock, contemporary R&B and light jazz touches that, together, reveal a starry-eyed earnestness." They discuss the album, her slot at Choachella, and her journey away from the big city. Email samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Emily King's Change Of 'Scenery'

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Denver teachers and supporters rally at the Colorado State Capitol. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: With National Emergency Declaration, The Border Wall Saga Continues

It's Friday. Sam will be seeing NPR's Susan Davis and Lulu Garcia-Navarro in the studio as they bid farewell to NASA's Opportunity Mars Rover. They're breaking down the issues raised as President Trump declares a national emergency in order to build the border wall. Also, what led more teachers — this time in Denver — to strike this week? Plus, Sue explains why she's over the TV show 'This Is Us' in a new segment.

Weekly Wrap: With National Emergency Declaration, The Border Wall Saga Continues

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Ajahnay Cooper poses for a portrait at Castlemont High School in Oakland, Calif., where she is a student. The program Youth ALIVE! at Castlemont High School helps students who have been affected by gun violence and other traumas. James Tensuan for NPR hide caption

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James Tensuan for NPR

Beyond Parkland: Oakland Kids Who Experience Gun Violence Every Day

It's Tuesday. Sam talks with three Oakland teenagers about the gun violence they regularly encounter. They have been held up at gunpoint and known friends and mentors who have been shot. These Castlemont High School students are involved with a violence intervention program called Youth ALIVE! Through the program, they mentor middle school students on the dangers of guns.

Beyond Parkland: Oakland Kids Who Experience Gun Violence Every Day

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Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam speaks with reporters at a press conference. Alex Edelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Blackface In Virginia, 'El Chapo' Trial, How AOC Set The News Cycle

It's Friday. Sam is putting on his best falsetto to sing along with NPR reporters Sarah Gonzalez and Julia Furlan. They're digging into peculiar details of the 'El Chapo' trial, as well as how changes to federal law could be the cause of a rise in sex trafficking. Plus, Sam chats with a listener who grew up in Virginia about racism in the state.

Weekly Wrap: Blackface In Virginia, 'El Chapo' Trial, How AOC Set The News Cycle

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Angie Thomas attends The Hate U Give cast and filmmakers presentation at Essence Festival 2018 on July 6, 2018 in New Orleans. Thomas's new book is called On The Come Up. Ryan Theriot/Getty Images for 20th Century Fox hide caption

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Ryan Theriot/Getty Images for 20th Century Fox

Author Angie Thomas Writes To 'Mirror' Young, Black Readers

It's Tuesday. Sam chats with Angie Thomas, author of the best-selling young adult novel 'The Hate U Give' about her new book, 'On The Come Up.' They talk about both her books, about proving there's a huge audience for the black experience in young adult literature, and about moving on up — and why it's complicated. Email samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Author Angie Thomas Writes To 'Mirror' Young, Black Readers

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Howard Schultz, the billionaire former Starbucks CEO, speaks at a Barnes and Noble bookstore about his new book From the Ground Up. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Schultz Ponders The Presidency, 'Leaving Neverland' Stirs At Sundance

It's Friday. Sam's got one hand in his pocket, and the other one is welcoming LA Times reporter Amy Kaufman and NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates to the studio. They dive into Howard Schultz's possible 2020 presidential run, the latest in controversial technology and the reaction to a Michael Jackson-focused documentary that premiered at Sundance. Plus, what's with the NFL's recent ratings increase? Clinton Yates from ESPN's 'The Undefeated' weighs in.

Weekly Wrap: Schultz Ponders The Presidency, 'Leaving Neverland' Stirs At Sundance

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Tituss Burgess plays Titus Andromedon on the Netflix show 'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.' Universal Television/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images hide caption

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Universal Television/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Tituss Burgess Is The 'Author And Finisher' Of His Own Fate

It's Tuesday. Burgess is one of the stars of the hit Netflix show 'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.' He gets real on playing an extrovert (as an introvert), going from rural Georgia to Broadway, and his love for 99-cent stores. Tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Tituss Burgess Is The 'Author And Finisher' Of His Own Fate

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Ja Rule attends City Harvest's 23rd Annual Gala in New York on April 25, 2017. Ja Rule was a co-founder of the infamous Fyre Festival in the Bahamas. Christopher Smith/Christopher Smith/Invision/AP hide caption

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Christopher Smith/Christopher Smith/Invision/AP

Weekly Wrap: TikTok, Climate Change & Fyre Fest

It's Friday. Uh-oh, another episode with Sam, this time with NPR Reporter Vanessa Romo (@vanromo) and KPCC science reporter Jacob Margolis (@JacobMargolis), host of 'The Big One.' They cover the latest on the military transgender ban and a new climate change survey, while Sam digs deep on the social media app TikTok with help from Atlantic staff writer Taylor Lorenz (@TaylorLorenz). Email samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Weekly Wrap: TikTok, Climate Change & Fyre Fest

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Brandon Victor Dixon as Tom Collins in Rent: Live airing Sunday, Jan. 27 on FOX. Pamela Littky/FOX hide caption

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Pamela Littky/FOX

A Broadway Star And Director On 'Rent: Live'

It's Tuesday. Sam talks to 'Hamilton' star Brandon Victor Dixon and Broadway director Michael Greif about bringing the groundbreaking 1996 Broadway musical 'Rent' to live television — January 27 at 8 PM EST on FOX. They discuss the difference between stage and television performance, what made 'Rent' such an influential musical, and that time Brandon Victor Dixon spoke to Vice President-elect Mike Pence after a performance of 'Hamilton.' Email the show at samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with your feedback.

A Broadway Star And Director On 'Rent: Live'

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President Donald Trump speaks alongside fast food he purchased for a ceremony honoring the 2018 College Football Playoff National Champion Clemson Tigers on January 14, 2019. SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Las Vegas, Paradise & Hamberders

It's Friday. Sam ooga-chakas this week with NPR National Desk correspondent Leila Fadel (@LeilaFadel) and 'The Nevada Independent' editor Jon Ralston (@RalstonReports). They talk the latest on Syria, Brexit, and a family's choice not to return to Paradise, Calif., following the wildfires there. Plus, is Marie Kondo really telling you to throw away your books?

Weekly Wrap: Las Vegas, Paradise & Hamberders

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