Rough Translation How are the things we're talking about being talked about somewhere else in the world? Gregory Warner tells stories that follow familiar conversations into unfamiliar territory. At a time when the world seems small but it's as hard as ever to escape our echo chambers, Rough Translation takes you places.
Rough Translation
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Rough Translation

From NPR

How are the things we're talking about being talked about somewhere else in the world? Gregory Warner tells stories that follow familiar conversations into unfamiliar territory. At a time when the world seems small but it's as hard as ever to escape our echo chambers, Rough Translation takes you places.

Most Recent Episodes

Amram and Gina Maman (second and third from left) with Aysha Abu Shhab (fourth from left) and other hotel patients. Aysha Abu Shhab hide caption

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Aysha Abu Shhab

Hotel Corona

One hundred and eighty recovering COVID-19 patients. One Jerusalem hotel. Secular, religious, Arabs, Jews, old, young. Their phones are out, they're recording. And the rest of Israel is... tuning in.

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A green sweater that Jessie crocheted in China while waiting for Jacquie, her American surrogate, to deliver her baby. Jessie, Reproduced With Permission hide caption

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Jessie, Reproduced With Permission

American Surrogate: 30 Months Later

Back in 2017, we brought you the story of a Chinese mom who hired an American surrogate to carry her baby. Each needed something from the other that was hard to admit. Their relationship became a crash course in transcontinental communication and the meaning of family. Now, in the middle of a pandemic, we check in with them.

American Surrogate: 30 Months Later

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"People who are stigmatized say they're made to feel that they are the disease themselves," said NPR correspondent Anthony Kuhn of some residents of South Korea, where the government publicizes personal data on COVID-19 carriers. Bernhard Lang/Getty Images hide caption

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Bernhard Lang/Getty Images

The Coronavirus Guilt Trip

Public shame is a powerful tool. But how useful is it when trying to curb a global pandemic? Shaming stories from South Korean chat rooms, a Pakistani street corner, and a Brooklyn grocery store.

The Coronavirus Guilt Trip

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A gloved passenger holds her phone on a subway train in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province on March 28. Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

WeChats From The Future

She felt the urgency before her husband did. A story about the time lag between the arrival of the coronavirus in two different nations, and how that played out in a marriage

WeChats From The Future

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To the left: an empty subway car in Beijing, China. To the right: a crowded park in Berlin, Germany. Amy Xiaomeng Cheng/NPR and Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Amy Xiaomeng Cheng/NPR and Rob Schmitz/NPR

How Covid-19 Is Challenging Cultures

This week on Rough Translation, we check in with NPR international correspondents in China, Germany and Greece about the ways that culture shapes—and is reshaped by—responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.

How Covid-19 Is Challenging Cultures

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Chinese exchange Student Li Jiabao (李家宝 aka 李家寶). Li is seeking asylum in Taiwan after posting a video that went viral on Twitter criticizing the Chinese president and Communist Party. NPR's Emily Feng hide caption

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NPR's Emily Feng

The Original Sin Of Li Jiabao

A young Chinese exchange student in Taiwan with no history of activism posts a video criticizing China's president Xi Jinping on Twitter, then asks for asylum. His request for protection fuels a larger discussion about Taiwan's role as a haven for Chinese dissidents, and also raises questions about who he is as an individual and his motivations. Who is he, and can he be trusted?

The Original Sin Of Li Jiabao

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Assassinated Major-General Qassem Soleimani. AP hide caption

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AP

Rough Translation Presents: Throughline

This week, we present the latest episode of NPR's Throughline, a look at the life and complicated legacy of the assassinated Iranian military leader, Qassem Soleimani.

Rough Translation Presents: Throughline

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A comedy team rehearses their sketch, at the Palace of Culture in Kramatorsk, Ukraine. Gregory Warner hide caption

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Gregory Warner

Whose Ukraine Is It Anyway?

Please, take our survey! At a Ukrainian comedy competition founded by President Volodymyr Zelensky, can humor unite a divided country?

Whose Ukraine Is It Anyway?

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A march through the streets of Kyiv. Gregory Warner hide caption

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Gregory Warner

Ukraine: Race Against The Machine

In the country on the other side of the impeachment hearings... A comedian runs for president of Ukraine and wins in a landslide, with a parliamentary majority to pass any law he wants. So now what? Our host, Gregory Warner, reports from Kyiv.

Ukraine: Race Against The Machine

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Preview: Rough Translation In Ukraine

Listen to hear a preview of a special two-part episode about Ukraine, reported by Gregory Warner.

Preview: Rough Translation In Ukraine

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