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Arts & Life

In the summer of 1927, Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston drove together from Alabama to New York. Just outside Savannah, Ga., they gave a ride to a young person running away from a chain gang. An essay Hughes wrote about that encounter has recently resurfaced: Read it here. Jack Delano/Library of Congress hide caption

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Jack Delano/Library of Congress

In Lost Essay, Langston Hughes Recounts Meeting A Young Chain Gang Runaway

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Leah Esguerra (right), who is credited with being the first social worker installed directly at a public library, strolls through the fifth floor of the San Francisco Public Library's main branch, joined by the library's health and safety associates (from left to right) Sidney Grindstaff, Jennifer Keys and Cary Latham. Jason Doiy/Courtesy of the San Francisco Public Library hide caption

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Jason Doiy/Courtesy of the San Francisco Public Library

Your Local Library May Have A New Offering In Stock: A Resident Social Worker

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Chiwetel Ejiofor and his onscreen counterpart in 2019's The Lion King, the power-hungry villain Scar. Kwaku Alston/Disney Enterprises, Inc. hide caption

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Kwaku Alston/Disney Enterprises, Inc.

The Metropolitan Opera's Rigoletto moves the setting from the sixteenth century to 1960 Las Vegas. Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera hide caption

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Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera
Penguin Random House

Rooted In History, 'The Nickel Boys' Is A Great American Novel

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A scene in the show 13 Reasons Why that had shown actress Katherine Langford's character taking her own life has been edited out. Richard Shotwell/Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP hide caption

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Richard Shotwell/Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

Musicians walk on a crosswalk painted like a piano outside the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y. Increasingly, urban designers and transportation planners say this kind of art — colorful crosswalks and engaging sidewalks — leads to safer intersections, stronger neighborhoods and better public health. Brett Dahlberg/WXXI hide caption

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Brett Dahlberg/WXXI

Walking On Painted Keys: Creative Crosswalks Meet Government Resistance

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At a ceremony Monday at the White House, President Trump defended his racist tweets against Democratic lawmakers. The language used in that tweet has a long history connected with nativist political movements. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

'Go Back Where You Came From': The Long Rhetorical Roots Of Trump's Racist Tweets

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Emily Nussbaum received the most hate mail of her career after she panned season 1 of HBO's True Detective. "Most of it was handwritten," she says. C. Clive Thompson/Penguin Random House hide caption

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C. Clive Thompson/Penguin Random House

We All Watch In Our Own Way: A Critic Tracks The 'TV Revolution'

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