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Donald Tusk, president of the European Council, speaks to reporters on Wednesday in Brussels. He told British Prime Minister Theresa May that an extension for withdrawal from the EU is possible, but with a caveat. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Alan Krueger, a Princeton University economist and chairman of former President Barack Obama's Council of Economic Advisers, specialized in workforce economics. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Ex-White House Economist Alan Krueger Dies; Saw Lessons For Economy In Rock Music

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Senior White House adviser Ivanka Trump, President Trump's daughter, has crafted an increase in child care funding as part of the White House's budget proposal set to be released on Monday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Exclusive: White House And Ivanka Trump Propose New Spending On Child Care

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Allison Hopelain, owner of The Kebabery in Oakland, Calif., says the cafeteria-style restaurant reflects the changing tastes of customers who now want to grab a quick, affordable meal and head back to their lives. Allison Hopelain/Courtesy of The Kebabery hide caption

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Allison Hopelain/Courtesy of The Kebabery

Bay Area's High Cost Of Living Squeezes Restaurant Workers, Chefs And Owners

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A truck passes a stack of China Shipping containers at the Port of Savannah in Georgia on July 5, 2018. The U.S. goods trade deficit with China hit a record $419.2 billion in 2018. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

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Stephen B. Morton/AP

A worker helps load steel rods April 6, 2016, at a plant in Tangshan, in China's Hebei province. China's government plays a powerful role in how its businesses operate — giving them preferential treatment over their rivals. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

China's Close Government-Business Ties Are A Key Challenge In U.S. Trade Talks

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President Trump meets with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in November. On Monday, Trump announced he would be ending preferential trade treatment for India. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
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Vodka bottles were seized by the customs authorities in the port of Rotterdam, on Feb. 26, destined for North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and his army command. Robin Utrecht/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robin Utrecht/AFP/Getty Images

Opinion: 90,000 Vodka Bottles Were Bound For North Korea, While Its People Starve

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The U.S. economy grew 2.9 percent last year, just missing President Trump's 3-percent target. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

U.S. Economy Grew 2.9 Percent In 2018, Just Below Trump's Target

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U.S. and Chinese trade negotiators meeting in Washington, D.C. last week. Citing progress in the talks, President Trump said he would suspend a planning increase in tariffs on Chinese goods due to take effect on March 1. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images