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Stir-fried mantou buns with cumin and chili. Food bloggers Stephanie Li and Christopher Thomas have eaten the small steamed bread often while on lockdown during the coronavirus outbreak. They had been working on a recipe for the buns before the virus hit, so they had a large supply of the ingredients. "Wanted a new way to finish it up, so stir frying it is," they wrote on their food blog. Stephanie Li and Christopher Thomas/Chinese Cooking Demystified hide caption

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Stephanie Li and Christopher Thomas/Chinese Cooking Demystified

In China, Quarantine Challenges Cooks To Get Clever

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The cold temperatures that pistachio trees need to bloom on time are becoming more scarce as winters get warmer. Lauren Sommer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/NPR

As Warm Winters Mess With Nut Trees' Sex Lives, Farmers Help Them 'Netflix And Chill'

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Break-Ups And Throw-Ups: What It's Like To Work At A Restaurant On Valentine's Day

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Methuselah, the first date palm tree grown from ancient seeds, in a photo taken in 2008. Guy Eisner hide caption

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Guy Eisner

Dates Like Jesus Ate? Scientists Revive Ancient Trees From 2,000-Year-Old Seeds

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Chopped and frozen samples of damaged soybean plants are kept in storage at the Office of the Indiana State Chemist. Many contain residues of the herbicide dicamba. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Pesticide Police, Overwhelmed By Dicamba Complaints, Ask EPA For Help

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Doughnuts with a receipt made of fondant were on display last week at a bakery in Moosinning, Germany. These Kassenbon Krapfen — receipt doughnuts — are a reaction to Germany's new receipt law. Tobias Hase/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Tobias Hase/picture alliance via Getty Images

Doctors who regularly see knife-related avocado injuries to the hand say people are less likely to hurt themselves if they don't cut the fruit while holding it in their palm. Gaye Launder/Flickr hide caption

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Gaye Launder/Flickr

Making Super Bowl Guacamole? Be Careful To Avoid The Pits Of An Avocado Hand Injury

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Dan Pashman/The Sporkful

Episode 968: The Trouble With Table 101

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Liveright

'Franchise' Tracks The Rise And Role Of Fast Food In Black America

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This chicken from Memphis Meats was produced with cells taken from an animal and grown into meat in a "cultivator." The process is analogous to how yeast is grown in breweries to produce beer. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR
Nikole Herriot and Michael Graydon

Not My Job: We Quiz Food Writer Alison Roman On Cooking The Books

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The Diner, which is a project of Meals on Wheels People in Vancouver, Wash., provides community in addition to meals for seniors enrolled in the program. Tom Cook/Courtesy Meals on Wheels People hide caption

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Tom Cook/Courtesy Meals on Wheels People

Meals On Wheels Serves Up Breakfast, Lunch And Community At Local Diner

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Barman Eddie Kim created the light and crisp "Truth and Clarity" cocktail — combining Capitoline White Vermouth, Suntory Toki Whisky, club soda and lemon vinegar — to ring in the new year. Laura Beltrán Villamizar/NPR hide caption

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Laura Beltrán Villamizar/NPR

A 'Truth And Clarity' Cocktail To Carry Us Into 2020

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Genie Milgrom, pictured in 2013, stands in the entryway of her Miami home wrapped in a long family tree, filled with the names of 22 generations of grandmothers. Raised Catholic, Milgrom traced her family's hidden Jewish roots with the help of a trove of ancient family recipes written down by the women of her family over generations. Emily Michot/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Emily Michot/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Trove Of Recipes Dating Back To Inquisition Reveals A Family's Secret Jewish Roots

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A new study suggests that one service already in place in many food deserts could help make it easier to access fresh, healthy food: online grocery delivery. The finding lends support to expanding a pilot program that lets people use food stamp benefits to pay for those groceries. svetikd/Getty Images hide caption

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svetikd/Getty Images