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Some of the cattle grazing on the Persson Ranch are tracked using blockchain technology, which may allow consumers to know where their meat comes from and more. Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio

Where's The Beef? Wyoming Ranchers Bet On Blockchain To Track It

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A female blue orchard bee forages for nectar and pollen on Phacelia tanacetifolia flowers, also known as blue or purple tansy. Blue orchard bees are solitary bees that help pollinate California's almond orchards. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED

Beer bottles with crowned caps crowd the conveyor belts of a filling plant in the Veltins brewery in Meschede-Grevenstein, western Germany, in January. Rainer Jensen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rainer Jensen/AFP/Getty Images

Uh-Oh, Germany Is Rapidly Running Out Of Beer Bottles

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Will Lambek, left, interprets for Enrique Balcazar, a Migrant Justice activist who helped negotiate the fair labor and living standards agreement with Ben & Jerry's. John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio

This laser unit is one of six that repel thieving birds from the blueberry fields of Meduri Farms near Jefferson, Ore. Tom Banse/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Tom Banse/Northwest News Network

Growers Are Beaming Over The Success Of Lasers To Stave Off Thieving Birds

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Fresh Fest co-founders Day Bracey (left) and Mike Potter (right) visit with Chris Harris, owner of Black Frog Brewery in Holland, Ohio, near Toledo. Jeff Zoet/Courtesy Day Bracey hide caption

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Jeff Zoet/Courtesy Day Bracey

Chef and television personality Guy Fieri prepares food at the 12th annual Vegas Uncork'd by Bon Appetit in Las Vegas. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Pop Culture Punching Bags

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The Feed the Future Tworore Inkoko, Twunguke project hosts a meeting in the Gataraga sector of Rwanda to recruit farmers to grow chickens. If the farmers commit to four days of training and pass a competency test, they are given a backyard coop worth about $625, as well as the means to obtain 100 day-old chicks, vaccines, feed and technical advice. Emily Urban/NPR hide caption

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Emily Urban/NPR

Louisiana crawfish caught in waters in and around Berlin are on display at Fisch Frank fish restaurant in Berlin. They are an invasive species and authorities recently licensed a local fisherman to catch them and sell them to local restaurants. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images

For Berlin, Invasive Crustaceans Are A Tough Catch And A Tough Sell

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Wild rice grows along the edges of the Kakagon River in Wisconsin. Joe Proudman/Courtesy of University of California Davis hide caption

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Joe Proudman/Courtesy of University of California Davis

Climate Change Threatens Midwest's Wild Rice, A Staple For Native Americans

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A small new study shows that successful dieters had an abundance of a bacteria called Phascolarctobacterium, whereas another bacteria, Dialister, was associated with a failure to lose weight. sorbetto/Getty Images hide caption

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sorbetto/Getty Images

Diet Hit A Snag? Your Gut Bacteria May Be Partly To Blame

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Pints of Guinness stouts are lined up at one of the outdoor bars at the new brewery. Guinness, famous for making stout beer, opened a new brewery in Maryland this week. It's the first time Guinness has had a brewery in the U.S. in more than 60 years. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Guinness Opens Its First U.S. Brewery In 64 Years

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The European Court of Justice ruled this week that genetic engineering methods - such as the use of certain applications of the gene cutter CRISPR - should be regulated as genetically engineered foods. Gregor Fischer/Getty Images hide caption

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Gregor Fischer/Getty Images

Along the back of this field of sugar snap peas, sunflowers and bachelor buttons at Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center is a buffer of maturing big-leaf maples and red-osier dogwoods. It's a combination of forest and thicket that the farm has left standing to help protect water quality in the river and aquifer. Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center hide caption

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Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center