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Health Care

President Trump talked to seniors about health care in central Florida in early October. "We eliminated Obamacare's horrible, horrible, very expensive and very unfair, unpopular individual mandate," Trump told the crowd. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

Trump Is Trying Hard To Thwart Obamacare. How's That Going?

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The latest challenge to the Affordable Care Act, Texas v. Azar, was argued in July in the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals. Attorney Robert Henneke, representing the plaintiffs, spoke outside the courthouse on July 9. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

A month after Hurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas, Sherrine Petit Homme LaFrance gets a hug from husband Ferrier Petit Homme. The storm destroyed their home on Grand Abaco Island. They are now living with China Laguerre in Nassau. Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR

Already, Health Canada has posted safety and efficacy data online for four newly approved drugs; it plans to release reports for another 13 drugs and three medical devices approved or rejected since March. Teerapat Seedafong/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Teerapat Seedafong/EyeEm/Getty Images

A woman rolls tobacco inside a tendu leaf to make a beedi cigarette at her home in Kannauj, Uttar Pradesh, India, on Wednesday, June 3, 2015. India's smokers favor cheaper options such as chewing and leaf-wrapped tobacco over cigarettes. Udit Kulshrestha/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Udit Kulshrestha/Bloomberg/Getty Images

India Banned E-Cigarettes — But Beedis And Chewing Tobacco Remain Widespread

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President Trump signed an executive order requiring changes to Medicare on Oct. 3. The order included some ideas that could raise costs for seniors, depending how they're implemented. Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

A colored X-ray of the lungs of a patient with silicosis, a type of pneumoconiosis. The yellow grainy masses in the lungs are areas of scarred tissue and inflammation. CNRI/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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CNRI/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

While prescriptions for durable medical equipment, such as orthotic braces or wheelchairs, have long been a staple of Medicare fraud schemes, some alleged scammers are now using telemedicine and unscrupulous health providers to prescribe unneeded equipment to distant patients. Joelle Sedlmeyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Joelle Sedlmeyer/Getty Images

President Trump greets supporters after arriving at Florida's Ocala International Airport on Thursday to give a speech on health care at The Villages retirement community. In his speech, Trump gave seniors a pep talk about what he wants to do for Medicare, contrasting it with plans of his Democratic rivals. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Advocates for safe injection sites rallied in front of the James A Byrne Federal Courthouse in Center City to show their support for evidence-based harm reduction policies, an end to the dehumanization of people suffering from addiction and the opening of Safehouse a safe injection site in Philadelphia, PA on September 5, 2019. Cory Clark/NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Cory Clark/NurPhoto/Getty Images

Sgt. Anna Lange filed a lawsuit against the county where she works in Georgia for refusing to allow her health insurance plan to cover gender-affirmation surgery. Audra Melton for NPR hide caption

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Audra Melton for NPR

A worker cuts black granite to make a countertop. Though granite, marble and "engineered stone" all can produce harmful silica dust when cut, ground or polished, the artificial stone typically contains much more silica, says a CDC researcher tracking cases of silicosis. danishkhan/Getty Images hide caption

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danishkhan/Getty Images

Workers Are Falling Ill, Even Dying, After Making Kitchen Countertops

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Missouri resident Patricia Powers had no health insurance when she was diagnosed with cancer a few years ago; she and her disabled husband were struggling to get by on, at most, $1,500 a month. If they'd lived across the river in Illinois, she'd have been eligible for Medicaid. Laura Ungar/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Laura Ungar/Kaiser Health News

An unexpected charge related to a biopsy threatened the financial security of Brianna Snitchler and her partner. Callie Richmond for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Callie Richmond for Kaiser Health News

A Biopsy Came With An Unexpected $2,170 'Cover Charge' For The Hospital

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In the alleged scheme, Medicare beneficiaries were offered, at no cost to them, genetic testing to estimate their cancer risk. Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images

U.S. Justice Department Charges 35 People In Fraudulent Genetic Testing Scheme

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Medicare Advantage health plans, mostly run by private insurance companies, have enrolled more than 22 million seniors and people with disabilities — more than 1 in 3 people who are on some sort of Medicare plan. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Some insurers using this new payment model offer a single fee to one OB-GYN or medical practice, which then uses part of that money to cover the hospital care involved in labor and delivery. Other insurers opt to cut a separate contract with the hospital. Adene Sanchez/Getty Images hide caption

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Adene Sanchez/Getty Images

A pharmacist collects packets of boxed medication from the shelves of a pharmacy in London, U.K. A proposal announced by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Thursday would allow the government to directly negotiate the price of 250 U.S. drugs, using what the drugs cost in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, and the United Kingdom as a baseline. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

How An 'International Price Index' Might Help Reduce Drug Prices

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Cameron and Katlynn Fischer celebrated their April wedding in Colorado. But the day before, Cameron was in such bad shape from a bachelor party hangover that he headed to an emergency room to be rehydrated. That's when their financial headaches began. Courtesy of Cameron Fischer hide caption

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Courtesy of Cameron Fischer

Ric Peralta and his wife Lisa are both able to check Ric's blood sugar levels at any time, using the Dexcom app and an arm patch that measures the levels and sends the information wirelessly. Allison Zaucha for NPR hide caption

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Allison Zaucha for NPR

It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies

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A group gathers at the state capitol in Austin, Texas, in May to protest abortion restrictions. In defiance of the state's ban on city funding of abortion providers, the Austin City Council has found a workaround to help women seeking the procedure. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

As Texas Cracks Down On Abortion, Austin Votes To Help Women Defray Costs

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