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Health Care

from local story: "Sickle cell pain has a mind of its own," said Anesha Barnes, who's had the disease since she was a baby. She says the longer she stays in a pain crisis, the harder it is to break out of it. Johnathon Kelso hide caption

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Johnathon Kelso

Effort To Control Opioids In An ER Leaves Some Sickle Cell Patients In Pain

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A Massachusetts woman who had an abortion when she was 15 stands outside the Suffolk County Courthouse in Boston. Right now, girls facing that decision who don't want to tell their parents must get a judge's approval. Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR

Massachusetts May Drop Requirement That Minors Get Permission For Abortion

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From left: Sekou Sheriff, of Barkedu village in Liberia, whose parents died at an Ebola treatment center; a polio vaccination booth in Pakistan; a schoolgirl in Ethiopia examines underwear with a pocket for a menstrual pad; an image from a video on the ethics of selfies; Consolata Agunga goes door-to-door as a community health worker in her village in Kenya. From left: John Poole/NPR; Jason Beaubien/NPR; Courtesy of Be Girl Inc.; SAIH Norway/Screenshot by NPR; Marc Silver/NPR hide caption

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From left: John Poole/NPR; Jason Beaubien/NPR; Courtesy of Be Girl Inc.; SAIH Norway/Screenshot by NPR; Marc Silver/NPR

Martin Shkreli, former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, appeared before the House Oversight Committee during a contentious hearing on drug pricing on Feb. 4, 2016. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Eliza Oliver helps her daughter, Taelyn, step down from the exam table after a wellness check at the Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas in Fort Scott, Kan. The child's doctor now has a medical scribe to takes notes. The visit this time seemed more "personal," Oliver says. Sarah Jane Tribble/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/Kaiser Health News

1 Year After Losing Its Hospital, A Rural Town Is Determined To Survive

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Texas will soon enact a law to prevent patients from getting hit with surprise medical bills. seksan Mongkhonkhamsao/Getty Images hide caption

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seksan Mongkhonkhamsao/Getty Images

Since its passage, the Affordable Care Act has been the subject of multiple court cases and attempts to derail it in Congress — attempts that garnered protests in 2017 and beyond. The law has survived, so far, but a key provision was struck down Wednesday in federal court. Albin Lohr-Jones/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Albin Lohr-Jones/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

The spending bill to fund the government for the next fiscal year is expected to pass by Friday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Some Big Health Care Policy Changes Are Hiding In The Federal Spending Package

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Scientists Reach Out To Minority Communities To Diversify Alzheimer's Studies

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Chef Tunde Wey uses food as a tool for social justice. His company, BabyZoos, aims to use profits from the sale of applesauce to hospitals to fund ventures that create more economic opportunities for African Americans in an effort to close racial wealth — and health — gaps. L. Kasimu Harris for NPR hide caption

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L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Families affected by preexisting medical conditions attend a Capitol Hill news conference in 2018 in support of the Affordable Care Act. Prior to the ACA, insurers could refuse to cover people who had even mild preexisting conditions — or charge them much more. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Nearly 30 years after the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, planes still lag behind many buses and trains. Regulations prohibit passengers from sitting in their own wheelchairs on commercial flights. Jon Hicks/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Hicks/Getty Images

Health insurers say the U.S. government owes them more than $12 billion in payments that were rescinded by a Republican-controlled Congress. The money was supposed to subsidize insurers' expected losses between 2014 and 2016. Phil Roeder/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Roeder/Getty Images

Medicare's overhauled Plan Finder debuted at the end of August. But health care advocates and insurance agents say the website has had big problems ever since, including inaccurate details about prices, which drugs each plan covers and their dosages. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Dr. Laurie Punch, a trauma surgeon at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, is adamant that violence is a true medical problem doctors must treat in both the operating room and the community. Whitney Curtis for KHN hide caption

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Whitney Curtis for KHN

Dr. BJ Miller's new project, the Center for Dying and Living, is a website designed for people to share their stories related to living with illness, disability or loss, or their stories of caring for someone with those conditions. Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Simon & Schuster

After A Freak Accident, A Doctor Finds Insight Into 'Living Life And Facing Death'

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