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Medicare's overhauled Plan Finder debuted at the end of August. But health care advocates and insurance agents say the website has had big problems ever since, including inaccurate details about prices, which drugs each plan covers and their dosages. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Dr. Laurie Punch, a trauma surgeon at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, is adamant that violence is a true medical problem doctors must treat in both the operating room and the community. Whitney Curtis for KHN hide caption

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Whitney Curtis for KHN

Dr. BJ Miller's new project, the Center for Dying and Living, is a website designed for people to share their stories related to living with illness, disability or loss, or their stories of caring for someone with those conditions. Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Simon & Schuster

After A Freak Accident, A Doctor Finds Insight Into 'Living Life And Facing Death'

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Presidential candidates recognize health care is a key voting concern. But polled Democrats don't yet agree on the best solution. Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post/Getty Images

The Cambria factory in Minnesota manufactures slabs of engineered quartz for kitchen and bathroom countertops. If businesses don't follow worker protection rules, cutting these slabs to fit customers' kitchens can release lung-damaging silica dust. Cambria hide caption

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Cambria

'There's No Good Dust': What Happens After Quartz Countertops Leave The Factory

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Hokyoung Kim for NPR and KHN

When Teens Abuse Parents, Shame and Secrecy Make It Hard to Seek Help

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Years ago, Portia Smith (center) was afraid to seek care for her postpartum depression because she feared child welfare involvement. She and her daughters Shanell Smith (right), 19, and Najai Jones Smith (left), 15, pose for a selfie in February after makeup artist Najai made up everyone as they were getting ready at home to go to a movie together. Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer hide caption

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Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer

Black Mothers Get Less Treatment For Their Postpartum Depression

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If you don't have a steady source of healthy food, it's hard to manage chronic conditions. That's why health care providers are setting up food pantries — right in hospitals and clinics. mixetto/Getty Images hide caption

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mixetto/Getty Images

'Food Pharmacies' In Clinics: When The Diagnosis Is Chronic Hunger

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Matthew Braun, a first-year medical student at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences in Yakima, Wash., says his personal history with opioids will help him care for patients. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Medical Students Say Their Opioid Experiences Will Shape How They Prescribe

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Keith Meehan is one of an estimated 1 million Americans who get health care coverage through a health care sharing ministry. After Meehan's back surgery, Aliera and Trinity HealthShare declined to pay approximately $200,000 in medical bills, saying back pain was a preexisting condition. Todd Bookman/NHPR hide caption

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Todd Bookman/NHPR

Regulators Allege Christian-Based Health Care Provider Broke State, Federal Rules

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Geriatric oncologist Supriya Gupta Mohile meets with patient Jim Mulcahy at Highland Hospital in Rochester, N.Y. "If I didn't do a geriatric assessment and just looked at a patient I wouldn't have the same information," she says. Mike Bradley for NPR hide caption

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Mike Bradley for NPR

An infant is monitored for opioid withdrawal in a neonatal intensive care unit at the CAMC Women and Children's Hospital in Charleston, W.Va., in June. Infants exposed to opioids in utero often experience symptoms of withdrawal. Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images

In The Fight For Money For The Opioid Crisis, Will The Youngest Victims Be Left Out?

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Licensed practical nurse Stephanie Dotson measures Kent Beasley's blood pressure in downtown Atlanta in September. Dotson is a member of the Mercy Care team that works to bring medical care to Atlanta residents who are homeless. Bita Honarvar for WABE hide caption

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Bita Honarvar for WABE

They Bring Medical Care To The Homeless And Build Relationships To Save Lives

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Enrollment help was plentiful for insurance sign-ups in the early years of the Affordable Care Act, such as at this clinic in Bear, Del., in 2014. Though the Trump administration has since slashed the outreach budget, about 930,000 people have signed up for ACA health plans so far this year. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sandra King Young runs Medicaid in American Samoa, a U.S. territory that faces dramatic funding cuts to islanders' health care unless Congress acts. "This is the United States' shame in the islands," she says. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

America's 'Shame': Medicaid Funding Slashed In U.S. Territories

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A demonstrator celebrated outside the U.S. Supreme Court in 2015 after the court voted to uphold key tax subsidies that are part of the Affordable Care Act. But federal taxes and other measures designed to pay for the health care the ACA provides have not fared as well. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

As part of a clinical trial to treat sickle cell disease, Victoria Gray (center) has vials of blood drawn by nurses Bonnie Carroll (left) and Kayla Jordan at TriStar Centennial Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Gene-Edited 'Supercells' Make Progress In Fight Against Sickle Cell Disease

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Kathy Kleinfeld opened Houston Women's Reproductive Services, which offers medication abortions, because she saw a need for more flexible scheduling. Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

For Supporters Of Abortion Access, Troubling Trends In Texas

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José's son, who has schizophrenia, recently got into a fight that resulted in a broken window — an out-of-control moment from his struggle with mental illness. And it could increase his chances of deportation to a country where mental health care is even more elusive. Hokyoung Kim for NPR hide caption

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Hokyoung Kim for NPR

A Young Immigrant Has Mental Illness, And That's Raising His Risk of Being Deported

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One rule announced by the Trump administration Friday puts pressure on hospitals to reveal what they charge insurers for procedures and services. Critics say the penalty for not following the rule isn't stiff enough to be a an effective deterrent. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Trump Wants Insurers and Hospitals To Show Real Prices To Patients

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