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Mahmee CEO Melissa Hanna (right) and her mother Linda Hanna (left) co-founded the company in 2014. Linda's more than 40 years of clinical experience as a registered nurse and certified lactation consultant helped them understand the need, they say. Keith Alcantara/Mahmee hide caption

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Keith Alcantara/Mahmee

Robert Findley died after falling on the ice during a winter storm this February in Fort Scott, Kan. Mercy Hospital had recently closed, so he had to be flown to a neurology center 90 miles north in Kansas City, Mo. Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News

Brett Gray (left) as Jamal Turner, and Peggy Blow as Abuela, a lovable, pot-smoking grandma, in the first season of the Netflix teen drama On My Block. Netflix/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Netflix/Screenshot by NPR

Netflix Curbs Tobacco Use Onscreen, But Not Pot. What's Up With That?

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Vaping has been linked to a cluster of hospitalizations in Wisconsin, Illinois and Minnesota. sestovic/Getty Images hide caption

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sestovic/Getty Images

What's Behind A Cluster Of Vaping-Related Hospitalizations?

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FDA warns that smoking cigarettes causes Type 2 diabetes, which raises blood sugar, among other serious health risks. U.S. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

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U.S. Food and Drug Administration

A Harvard research team's prototype of a portable exosuit is made of cloth components worn at the waist and thighs. A computer that's built into the shorts uses an algorithm that can sense when the user shifts between a walking gait and a running gait. Wyss Institute at Harvard University hide caption

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Wyss Institute at Harvard University

These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail

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The wide-open spaces of Arco, Idaho, appeal to some doctors with a love of the outdoors. Thomas Hawk/Flickr hide caption

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Thomas Hawk/Flickr

Creative Recruiting Helps Rural Hospitals Overcome Doctor Shortages

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Many seniors take multiple drugs, which can lead to side effects like confusion, lightheadedness and difficulty sleeping. Doctors who specialize in the care of the elderly often recommend carefully reducing the medication load. Juanmonino/Getty Images hide caption

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Juanmonino/Getty Images

Timely support and treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder can help children focus and thrive, pediatricians say. But it takes close follow-up after diagnosis to tailor that treatment and avoid drug side effects. Weeraya Siankulpatanakij/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Weeraya Siankulpatanakij/EyeEm/Getty Images

Most Kids On Medicaid Who Are Prescribed ADHD Drugs Don't Get Proper Follow-Up

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Surgeons are starting to reduce their opioid prescribing habits a little. But they still prescribe a lot of pain pills in the midst of an opioid addiction crisis. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

Therapists Marcela Ot'alora and Bruce Poulter are trained to conduct MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. In this reenactment, they demonstrate how they help guide and watch over a patient who is revisiting traumatic memories while under the influence of MDMA. Courtesy of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies hide caption

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Courtesy of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies

MDMA, Or Ecstasy, Shows Promise As A PTSD Treatment

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The "Cadillac tax," an enacted but not yet implemented part of the Affordable Care Act, is a 40% tax on the most generous employer-provided health insurance plans — those that cost more than $11,200 per year for an individual policy or $30,150 for family coverage. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg Creative/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg Creative/Getty Images

Smog is common not only in Los Angeles but also in cities across the country. New research finds that long-term exposure to high levels of air pollution may be as harmful to the lungs as smoking. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Air Pollution May Be As Harmful To Your Lungs As Smoking Cigarettes, Study Finds

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Richard Ost owns Philadelphia Pharmacy, in the city's Kensington neighborhood. He says he has stopped carrying Suboxone, for the most part, because the illegal market for the drug brought unwanted traffic to his store. Nina Feldman/WHYY hide caption

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Nina Feldman/WHYY

It's The Go-To Drug To Treat Opioid Addiction. Why Won't More Pharmacies Stock It?

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People light candles during a prayer and candle vigil organized by the city, after the recent shooting at a WalMart in El Paso, Texas. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

From Pain To Purpose: 5 Ways To Cope In The Wake Of Trauma

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At Nashville's "High Five" camp, 12-year-old Priceless Garinger (center), whose right side has been weakened by cerebral palsy, wears a full-length, bright pink cast on her left arm — though that arm's strong and healthy. By using her weaker right arm and hand to decorate a cape, she hopes to gain a stronger grip and fine motor control. Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio

At 'High Five' Camp, Struggling With A Disability Is The Point

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If a doctor is found to be ordering too many MRI or CT scans or other imaging tests for Medicare patients, a federal law is supposed to require the physician to get federal approval for all diagnostic imaging. But the Trump administration has stalled the law's implementation. laflor/Getty Images hide caption

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laflor/Getty Images

In the U.S., firearms kill more people through suicide than homicide. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How The CDC's Reluctance To Use The 'F-Word' — Firearms — Hinders Suicide Prevention

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A large new "sensory space" at Pittsburgh International Airport is divided into separate rooms; families can tailor sound and light levels to each traveler, whatever their age. Courtesy of Pittsburgh International Airport hide caption

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Courtesy of Pittsburgh International Airport

Kids And Adults With Autism Flying Easier In Pittsburgh, With Airport's Help

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