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Dr. Michelle Salvaggio, medical director of the Infectious Diseases Institute at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, points to drugs used to treat HIV/AIDS. Medical advancements since the epidemic surfaced in the 1980s have helped many of her HIV-positive patients lead healthy lives. Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma

White House Plan To Stop HIV Faces A Tough Road In Oklahoma

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Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson announces changes to the state Medicaid program called Arkansas Works, including the addition of a work requirement for certain beneficiaries, on March 6, 2017. Michael Hibblen/KUAR hide caption

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Michael Hibblen/KUAR

In Arkansas, Thousands Of People Have Lost Medicaid Coverage Over New Work Rule

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Their research is still in early stages, but Kristin Myers (left), a mechanical engineer, and Dr. Joy Vink, an OB-GYN, both at Columbia University, have already learned that cervical tissue is a more complicated mix of material than doctors ever realized. Adrienne Grunwald for NPR hide caption

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Adrienne Grunwald for NPR

Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer

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Dramatic decreases in deaths from lung cancer among African-Americans were particularly notable, according to the American Cancer Society. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

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Siri Stafford/Getty Images

Scientists around the world criticized Chinese researcher He Jiankui's experimental editing of DNA in embryos that became twin girls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

In 2011, a 17-year-old named Mishka told readers of his Facebook post that his Salem, Ore., high school was "asking for a f***ing shooting." That post and other furious outbursts triggered a quick, but deep evaluation by the school district's threat assessment unit. Beth Nakamura for NPR hide caption

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Beth Nakamura for NPR

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Hesitancy about vaccination in a community has a lot to do with acculturation to its norms. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

Medical Anthropologist Explores 'Vaccine Hesitancy'

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Scientists have isolated a molecule with disease-fighting potential in a microbe living on a type of fungus-farming ant (genus Cyphomyrmex). The microbe kills off other hostile microbes attacking the ants' fungus, a food source. Courtesy of Alexander Wild/University of Wisconsin hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexander Wild/University of Wisconsin
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A Neuroscientist Explores The Biology Of Addiction In 'Never Enough'

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New recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force call for doctors to identify patients at risk of depression during pregnancy or after childbirth and refer them to counseling. Adene Sanchez/Getty Images hide caption

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To Prevent Pregnancy-Related Depression, At-Risk Women Advised To Get Counseling

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A man who goes by the name Dave Carvagio holds a packaged syringe in Pickering Square in Bangor, Maine. The Bangor chapter of the Church of Safe Injection sets up a table in the square and offers free naloxone, needles and other drug-using supplies. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

'Church Of Safe Injection' Offers Needles, Naloxone To Prevent Opioid Overdoses

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Demonstrators hold signs and chant in Richmond, Va., on Feb. 2. They were calling for the resignation of Gov. Ralph Northam after a racist photo on his medical school yearbook page came to light. He denies that he is in the photo but admits to once dressing in blackface. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Racist Med School Yearbook Photos? Medicine's Racism Problems Go Even Deeper

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The 'Strange Science' Behind The Big Business Of Exercise Recovery

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If you fear your child may have taken or received too much medicine, call the national poison control hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Giving Medicine To Young Children? Getting The Dose Right Is Tricky

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In Mexican border towns, big discount drugstores, as well as small pharmacies like this one in Tijuana, market their less expensive medicines to American tourists. Guillermo Arias/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/Bloomberg via Getty Images

American Travelers Seek Cheaper Prescription Drugs In Mexico And Beyond

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Ariel Davis for NPR

School Shooters: What's Their Path To Violence?

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Measles is a highly contagious illness that can cause serious health problems, including brain damage, deafness and, in rare cases, death. Vaccination can prevent measles infections. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Defying Parents, A Teen Decides To Get Vaccinated

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AIDS activist group ACT UP organized numerous protests on Wall Street in the 1980s. The group's tactics helped speed the process of finding an effective treatment for AIDS. Tim Clary/AP hide caption

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Tim Clary/AP

How To Demand A Medical Breakthrough: Lessons From The AIDS Fight

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Rep. John Dingell was seated next to President Barack Obama when he signed the Affordable Care Act into law at the White House on March 23, 2010. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Amber Gorrow and her daughter, Eleanor, 3, pick out a show to watch after Eleanor's nap at their home in Vancouver, Wash., on Wednesday. Eleanor has gotten her first measles vaccine, but Gorrow's son, Leon, 8 weeks, is still too young to be immunized. Alisha Jucevic/Getty Images hide caption

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Alisha Jucevic/Getty Images

Measles Cases Mount In Pacific Northwest Outbreak

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