Health Health

The Food and Drug Administration has seen a sharp increase in applications for drug to treat rare diseases. An oversight report found problems with how agency is handling them. Al Drago/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images

A medical worker holds a measles-rubella vaccine at a health station in Banda Aceh, Indonesia. Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images

The Trump administration said Thursday it wants states to innovate in ways that could produce more lower-cost health insurance options — even if those alternatives do not provide the same level of financial or medical coverage as an ACA plan. Getty Images hide caption

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What's Behind The Geographical Disparities Of Drug Overdoses In The U.S.

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The Average Length Of An American Life Continues To Decrease

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Harvard Medical School Dean Weighs In On Ethics Of Gene Editing

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Kristen Philman first tried methamphetamine in her early 20s, as an alternative to heroin and other opioids. When she discovered she was pregnant, she says, it was a wake-up call, and she did what she needed to do to stop using all those drugs. Theo Stroomer for NPR hide caption

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Theo Stroomer for NPR

Another Drug Crisis: Methamphetamine Use By Pregnant Women

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In experiments involving people with epilepsy, targeted zaps of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex region of the brain helped ease depressive symptoms. Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Improve Mood By Stimulating A Brain Area Above The Eyes

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Syringes of fentanyl, an opioid painkiller, sit in an inpatient facility in Salt Lake City. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, opioid-related overdoses have contributed to the life expectancy drop in the U.S. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

American biologist David Baltimore criticized a fellow scientist who claims he has edited the genes human embryos during the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing at the University of Hong Kong. China News Service/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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China News Service/VCG via Getty Images

Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium

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The number of children in the United States without health insurance jumped to 3.9 million in 2017 from about 3.6 million the year before, according to census data. Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images hide caption

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Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images

Chinese Scientist Responsible For Genetically Altered Twins Faces Intense Criticism

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