Health Health

Though his politics are right of center and he lobbied hard against the Affordable Care Act, Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch also has been key to passing several landmark health laws with bipartisan support. Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Getty Images

How Sen. Orrin Hatch Shaped America's Health Care In Controversial Ways

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Researchers say human brains can become overwhelmed by cute traits, such as large eyes and small noses, embodied by movie characters like Bambi. Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images hide caption

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Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive

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Coconut oil's potential health benefits are outweighed by its heavy dose of saturated fat, most nutrition experts say. Saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Russ Rohde/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Russ Rohde/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Is Coconut Oil All It's Cracked Up To Be? Get The Facts On This Faddish Fat

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The federal website where consumers can sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act is shown on a computer screen in Washington, D.C., last month. The federal judge in Texas, who earlier this month ruled the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional, said that the law can remain in effect while under appeal. AP hide caption

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AP

Protective equipment for Ebola care is left on the ground next to ransacked tents by demonstrators at the Ebola transit centre in Beni, following a demonstration last week against the postponement of elections in the territory of the Beni and the city of Butembo. Alexis Huguet /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexis Huguet /AFP/Getty Images

Neighbors carry the coffin that contains the body of Jakelin Caal Maquin into her grandparents' home in San Antonio Secortez, Guatemala. The 7-year-old girl died while in the custody of the U.S. Border Patrol. Oliver de Ros/AP hide caption

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Oliver de Ros/AP

Pediatricians Voice Concerns About Care Following Two 'Needless' Migrant Deaths

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The Trump administration EPA says regulations to reduce power plant emissions of mercury and other hazardous air pollutants are too costly and should no longer be considered legally "appropriate and necessary." Matt Brown/AP hide caption

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Matt Brown/AP

There is a whole subset of people who can't imagine popcorn without a sprinkling of nutritional yeast, which is naturally full of B vitamins that are harder to come by in meat-free diets. Getty Images hide caption

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Jay McAbee, a bus driver with the Greenville, S.C., school district, waits by his bus in Charleston, S.C., in October of 2016, for word of when to start evacuating the city's residents in advance of Hurricane Matthew. Simply having enough buses to carry pets as well as people can be key to convincing residents they need to leave ahead of a big storm, emergency responders say. Mic Smith/AP hide caption

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Mic Smith/AP

Safely Evacuating The Elderly In Any Emergency Takes Planning And Practice

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Even for conventional medical treatments that are covered under most health insurance policies, the large copays and high deductibles have left many Americans with big bills, says a health economist, who sees the rise in medical fundraisers as worrisome. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Patients Are Turning To GoFundMe To Fill Health Insurance Gaps

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