Health Health

A combination vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella protects kids against all three illnesses with one shot. Courtney Perry/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Courtney Perry/The Washington Post/Getty Images

States Move To Restrict Parents' Refusal To Vaccinate Their Kids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/698606894/699514509" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Producer Melissa Berton (center) and director Rayka Zehtabchi (right) accept an Oscar for their documentary 'Period. End of Sentence.' Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Hispanic and black children are over-represented in child poverty totals. NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

Report: Child Poverty Could Be Cut In Half Over 10 Years, At A Hefty Price

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/698617021/699119066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Abortion-rights activists gathered for a news conference in New York City Monday to protest the Trump administration's proposed restrictions on family planning providers. The rule would force any medical provider receiving federal assistance to refuse to promote, refer for, perform or support abortion as a method of family planning. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Hundreds of health care providers around the United States allow their patients to use Apple's Health app to store their medical records. Apple hide caption

toggle caption
Apple

Storing Health Records On Your Phone: Can Apple Live Up To Its Privacy Values?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/697026827/698700518" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Aging Offers Women 'Enormous Possibilities For Growth,' Says Author

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/698535498/698650985" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In their classic radio show, Car Talk, hosts Ray and Tom Magliozzi, demonstrated what some doctors consider an ideal example of the thinking doctors need to learn to make a good medical diagnosis. Liz Linder/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Liz Linder/WBUR

Bill That Would Regulate Doctors' Care Of Babies Who Survive Abortions Fails In Senate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/698342877/698342878" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Leaders Of 7 Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Face Tough Questioning On Capitol Hill

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/698342884/698342885" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A pesticide warning sign in an orange grove warns in English and Spanish that the pesticide chlorpyrifos, or Lorsban, has been applied to these orange trees. Jim West/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Jim West/Science Source

Will An Appeals Court Make The EPA Ban A Pesticide Linked To Serious Health Risks?

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/698227414/698240973" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The common practice of double-booking a lead surgeon's time and letting junior physicians supervise and complete some parts of a surgery is safe for most patients, a study of more than 60,000 operations finds. But there may be a small added risk for a subset of patients. Ian Lishman/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ian Lishman/Getty Images

Carol Marley, a hospital nurse with private insurance, says coping with the financial fallout of her pancreatic cancer has been exhausting. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Gorman/KHN

Cancer Complications: Confusing Bills, Maddening Errors And Endless Phone Calls

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/696321475/698342904" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., left, and Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, right, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, asked drug company CEOs some tough questions about drug prices on Tuesday during a hearing before the Senate Finance Committee. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP