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Severe black lung disease deeply scarred the lung of a 61-year-old West Virginia coal miner, which was removed as part of a lung transplant. Courtesy of NIOSH hide caption

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Courtesy of NIOSH

Kentucky Lawmakers Limit Black Lung Claims Reviews Despite Epidemic

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In her new book, Barbara Lipska describes surviving cancer that had spread to her brain, and how the illness changed her cognition, character and, ultimately, her understanding of the mental illnesses she studies. Courtesy of the author hide caption

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Courtesy of the author

'The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind' Returns From Madness

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Sara Wong for NPR

Invisibilia: Do the Patterns in Your Past Predict Your Future?

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After a lifetime of agricultural work on the U.S. mainland, Ausberto Maldonado retired home to a suburb of San Juan, Puerto Rico. But he has diabetes, and especially since Hurricane Maria, has been struggling to get by. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

Time's Running Out For Many Frail, Older People In Puerto Rico

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A document developed by a New York end-of-life agency permits people who want to avoid the ravages of advanced dementia to make their final wishes known — while they still have the ability to do so. One version requests that all food and fluids be withheld under certain circumstances. Skynesher/Getty Images hide caption

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Skynesher/Getty Images

Arlington, Mass., Police Chief Fred Ryan (right) and Inspector Gina Bassett review toxicology reports on cocaine evidence looking for the possibility of fentanyl. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Fentanyl-Laced Cocaine Becoming A Deadly Problem Among Drug Users

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Mindfulness gurus Geneen Roth and Ed Espe Brown have long championed the idea that how we relate to food affects other aspects of our lives. In new super-personal essay collections, they reassess their past self-help advice. Neil Webb/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Neil Webb/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Velva Poole works to reunite children with parents who have been grappling with substance use disorder. Mentoring the parents, she says, is a big part of the state-sponsored program's success. Lisa Gillespie/Louisville Public Media hide caption

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Lisa Gillespie/Louisville Public Media

Opioid Treatment Program Helps Keep Families Together

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The temperature in a cryogenic tank at a fertility clinic in suburban Cleveland fluctuated earlier this month, rendering some 4,000 eggs and embryos nonviable. Lluis Gene/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lluis Gene/AFP/Getty Images