Health Health

California Lawmakers Consider Abortion Pills On Campus

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UK Biobank, based in Manchester, England, is the largest blood-based research project in the world. The research project will involve at least 500,000 people across the U.K., and follow their health for next 30 years or more, providing a resource for scientists battling diseases. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

UK Biobank Requires Earth's Geneticists To Cooperate, Not Compete

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A Look At The Costs From The Opioid Epidemic

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Water utilities need quick ways to check for contamination in the drinking water supply, including from norovirus, which causes intestinal distress. Scientists are trying to make it easier to test for the virus. Rehan Hasan / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Rehan Hasan / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

A Speedy Test For Norovirus Could Help Water Supplies Check For Contamination

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Dr. Omar Salim Akhtar of Kashmir protested the clampdown on telephone and Internet communications by Indian authorities at a press conference on Aug. 26. He was later arrested, then released after a few hours. Muzamil Mattoo/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Muzamil Mattoo/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Esperance Nabintu, 42, an Ebola survivor, photographed on Aug. 15 in Goma. One of her children also contracted the disease and survived. But her husband, Rene Daniele Fataki, died from the disease. This photo was taken as friends and family gathered at her home to mourn and to celebrate his life. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

A paramedic takes a blood sample from a baby for an HIV test in Larkana, Pakistan, on May 9. The government has been offering screenings in response to an HIV outbreak. Rizwan Tabassum /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum /AFP/Getty Images

The Massive Effort To Halt Ebola In Congo

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Kristin Sollars (left) and Marci Ebberts say nursing is more than just a job. "Sometimes I wonder why everyone in the world doesn't want to be a nurse," Sollars says. Emilyn Sosa for StoryCorps hide caption

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Emilyn Sosa for StoryCorps

For 2 Nurses, Working In The ICU Is 'A Gift Of A Job'

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Researchers looked for genetic variants linked to sexual behavior in new genetic research that analyzed DNA from donated blood samples from nearly half a million middle-aged people from Britain who participated in a project called UK Biobank. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Search For 'Gay Genes' Comes Up Short In Large New Study

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Scientists say pea-size organoids of human brain tissue may offer a way to study the biological beginnings of a wide range of brain conditions, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences hide caption

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Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences

After Months In A Dish, Lab-Grown Minibrains Start Making 'Brain Waves'

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Marijuana use is risky for teens and pregnant women and can be habit-forming, says the U.S. surgeon general. Jane Khomi/Getty Images hide caption

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Jane Khomi/Getty Images

Surgeon General Sounds Alarm On Risk Of Marijuana Addiction And Harm

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Before scheduling his hernia surgery, Wolfgang Balzer called the hospital, the surgeon and the anesthesiologist to get estimates for how much the procedure would cost. But when his bill came, the estimates he had obtained were wildly off. John Woike for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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John Woike for Kaiser Health News

Bill Of The Month: Estimate For Cost Of Hernia Surgery Misses The Mark

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