Health Health

Genetically modified "gene drive" mosquitoes feed on warm cow's blood. Scientists hope these mosquitoes could help eradicate malaria. Pierre Kattar for NPR hide caption

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Pierre Kattar for NPR

Scientists Release Controversial Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In High-Security Lab

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How One Woman Is Working To Educate Parents On Vaccinations

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The safety director at Grand Canyon National Park says people may have been exposed to radiation from three buckets of uranium ore that sat for years in a museum collection building. Whether the amount of exposure was unsafe has not been determined. Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images

Dr. Michelle Salvaggio, medical director of the Infectious Diseases Institute at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, points to drugs used to treat HIV/AIDS. Medical advancements since the epidemic surfaced in the 1980s have helped many of her HIV-positive patients lead healthy lives. Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma

White House Plan To Stop HIV Faces A Tough Road In Oklahoma

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President Trump's Plan To Stop HIV Faces A Tough Road In Oklahoma

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Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson announces changes to the state Medicaid program called Arkansas Works, including the addition of a work requirement for certain beneficiaries, on March 6, 2017. Michael Hibblen/KUAR hide caption

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Michael Hibblen/KUAR

In Arkansas, Thousands Of People Have Lost Medicaid Coverage Over New Work Rule

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UNOCHA's new set of icons aims to streamline communication in response to humanitarian crises. United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs hide caption

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United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs

Their research is still in early stages, but Kristin Myers (left), a mechanical engineer, and Dr. Joy Vink, an OB-GYN, both at Columbia University, have already learned that cervical tissue is a more complicated mix of material than doctors ever realized. Adrienne Grunwald for NPR hide caption

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Adrienne Grunwald for NPR

Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer

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Dramatic decreases in deaths from lung cancer among African-Americans were particularly notable, according to the American Cancer Society. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

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Siri Stafford/Getty Images

Why Men In Mississippi Are Still Dying Of AIDS, Despite Existing Treatments

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The Naval Air Warfare Center in Warminster, Pa., is one of many places across the U.S. where the foams once used in firefighting training contained harmful chemicals known as PFAS. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Scientists around the world criticized Chinese researcher He Jiankui's experimental editing of DNA in embryos that became twin girls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

Health staff prepare a cholera treatment tent in September 2018. The country's health system lacks the capacity to contain diseases like cholera. Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images