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Under sweeping new recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, doctors would see new mothers sooner and more frequently, and insurers would cover the increased visits. FatCamera/Getty Images hide caption

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FatCamera/Getty Images

A new study offers a systematic look at what midwives can and can't do in different states, offering evidence that empowering them could boost maternal and infant health. Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Florida state Sen. Gary Farmer speaks during the 2017 session in Tallahassee, Fla. He has introduced a new bill that would eliminate the false identity provision and clarify the statute so that it applies only to people who commit traditional workers' comp fraud, such as lying about injuries or eligibility for benefits. Steve Cannon/AP hide caption

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Steve Cannon/AP

Pauline stands in her room after coming home from a day program for adults with intellectual disabilities. Michelle Gustafson for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Gustafson for NPR

The Sexual Assault Epidemic No One Talks About

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Patricia (from left), Natalie and their mother, Rosemary, sit in their home in Northern California. Natalie, a woman with an intellectual disability, is unable to speak. She couldn't explain what was wrong and doctors couldn't figure out why she was in pain. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

'She Can't Tell Us What's Wrong'

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James Meadours (left), Debbie Robinson and Thomas Mangrum share their stories about sexual assault. Lizzie Chen for NPR; Claire Harbage and Meg Anderson/NPR hide caption

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Lizzie Chen for NPR; Claire Harbage and Meg Anderson/NPR

In Their Own Words: People With Intellectual Disabilities Talk About Rape

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An NPR investigation finds that people with intellectual disabilities suffer one of the highest rates of sexual assault — and that compared with other rape victims, they are even more likely to be assaulted by someone they know. Cornelia Li for NPR hide caption

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Cornelia Li for NPR

From The Frontlines Of A Sexual Assault Epidemic: 2 Therapists Share Stories

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Lyons-Boswick goes to Veterans Courthouse in Newark to have a judge sign off on a warrant she needs to prosecute a sexual assault case. Cassandra Giraldo for NPR hide caption

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Cassandra Giraldo for NPR

How Prosecutors Changed The Odds To Start Winning Some Of The Toughest Rape Cases

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A participant helps Park hang the agenda on the wall at the start of class. Brianna Soukup for NPR hide caption

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Brianna Soukup for NPR

For Some With Intellectual Disabilities, Ending Abuse Starts With Sex Ed

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Leah Bahrencu, 35, of Austin, Texas, developed an infection after an emergency C-section to deliver twins Lukas and Sorana, now 11 months. Ilana Panich-Linsman hide caption

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Ilana Panich-Linsman

Wanda Irving holds her granddaughter, Soleil, in front of a portrait of Soleil's mother, Shalon, at her home in Sandy Springs, Ga. Wanda is raising Soleil since Shalon died of complications due to hypertension a few weeks after giving birth. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Black Mothers Keep Dying After Giving Birth. Shalon Irving's Story Explains Why

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Millions of Americans struggle to afford their rent and most don't get any help at all. In Dallas, the city and a prominent landlord are the latest moving pieces in this problem. Allison V. Smith for KERA hide caption

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Allison V. Smith for KERA

Choosing Between Squalor Or The Street: Housing Without Government Aid

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Cellos are lined up backstage at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra before a Nov. 8 rehearsal of Schubert's Ninth Symphony. The CITES Rosewood regulations have made some musicians apprehensive about taking instruments containing the wood across international borders. Meg Anderson/NPR hide caption

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Meg Anderson/NPR

The Tree That Rocked The Music Industry

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A lot factors come into play in creating a guitar's sound.There's size and shape of the instrument and its parts. Then, there's the skill and the approach of the musician to consider. kertu_ee/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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kertu_ee/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Yuliana Rocha Zamarripa's workers' comp claim for a serious knee injury at work prompted her arrest. She was shuffled from county to immigration jails for a year and blames the sexual abuse of her daughter on her inability to protect her at home. Scott McIntyre for ProPublica hide caption

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Scott McIntyre for ProPublica

They Got Hurt At Work — Then They Got Deported

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Lauren Bloomstein holds her newborn daughter. Courtesy of the Bloomstein Family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Bloomstein Family

Focus On Infants During Childbirth Leaves U.S. Moms In Danger

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Marie McCausland holds her newborn shortly after delivery. A ProPublica/NPR story about preeclampsia prompted her to seek emergency treatment when she developed symptoms days after giving birth. Courtesy of Marie McCausland hide caption

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Courtesy of Marie McCausland

A man walks into the building of the Internal Revenue Service, which oversees the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Program, in Washington, D.C., on March 10, 2016. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

The $25 million Labre Place in Miami was built using the low-income housing tax credit program. It's named for the patron saint for the homeless and is now home to 90 low-income residents, about half of whom were once homeless. Screenshot courtesy of Frontline (PBS) hide caption

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Screenshot courtesy of Frontline (PBS)

Affordable Housing Program Costs More, Shelters Fewer

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Farryn Giles and her son Isaiah, 6, walk in their east Dallas neighborhood. While she received a Section 8 voucher to help them move to a neighborhood with more opportunities, finding an apartment that would take the voucher was challenging. Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR hide caption

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Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Section 8 Vouchers Help The Poor — But Only If Housing Is Available

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An aerial view of the Lewisburg prison complex in Pennsylvania. Google Earth hide caption

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Google Earth

Lawsuit Says Lewisburg Prison Counsels Prisoners With Crossword Puzzles

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