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A Burberry model wearing a hoodie with a cord tied like a noose at the Autumn/Winter 2019 fashion week runway show in London. Company leaders have apologized for the garment. Vianney Le Caer/Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP hide caption

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Vianney Le Caer/Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP

The safety director at Grand Canyon National Park says people may have been exposed to radiation from three buckets of uranium ore that sat for years in a museum collection building. Whether the amount of exposure was unsafe has not been determined. Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images

Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo said criminal charges will be filed "against whoever is appropriate" on his department, following a drug bust that resulted in the deaths of two suspects. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Air Force is in charge of some military space activities, such as an X-37B experimental robotic space plane, shown here as it was launched by a rocket. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Trump Pushes Ahead With 'Space Force' Despite Hurdles

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Andrew McCabe, then acting FBI director, testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee on May 11, 2017. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Andrew McCabe: FBI Investigations Into Trump 'Were Extraordinary Steps'

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Dr. Michelle Salvaggio, medical director of the Infectious Diseases Institute at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, points to drugs used to treat HIV/AIDS. Medical advancements since the epidemic surfaced in the 1980s have helped many of her HIV-positive patients lead healthy lives. Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma

White House Plan To Stop HIV Faces A Tough Road In Oklahoma

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Ginsburg, sketched here with the rest of the Supreme Court last year, worked from home on the cases the court heard in January. On Tuesday, she returned to the bench. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

Justice Ginsburg Appears Strong In First Appearance At Supreme Court This Year

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Jay Jordan, 33, is the director of the #TimeDone/Second Chances project for the nonprofit Californians for Safety and Justice. The clinic involves public defenders who volunteer to help people get their criminal charges or records reduced or expunged. Philip Cheung for NPR hide caption

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Philip Cheung for NPR

Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance

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A section of border wall separates Tijuana, Mexico, from San Diego, as seen from the U.S. in January. California has filed a lawsuit along with 15 other states, calling President Trump's use of a national emergency declaration to redirect money toward border wall construction unconstitutional. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Bret Adee, a third-generation beekeeper who owns one of the largest beekeeping companies in the U.S., lost half of his hives — about 50,000 — over the winter. He pops the lid on one of the hives to show off the colony inside. Greta Mart/KCBX hide caption

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Greta Mart/KCBX

Massive Loss Of Thousands Of Hives Afflicts Orchard Growers And Beekeepers

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Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has vowed to launch an investigation into whether officials at the Justice Department and the FBI were plotting a "bureaucratic coup" to oust President Trump. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Chico Housing Action Team organizers Leslie Johnson, left, Charles Withuhn, center, and Bill Kurnizki, right, in the field in south Chico where they plan to soon break ground on a 33-unit tiny home community for homeless adults called Simplicity Village. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Tiny Homes For Homeless Get The Go-Ahead In The Wake of California's Worst Wildfire

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President Trump speaks in the Rose Garden at the White House on Friday to declare a national emergency in order to build a wall along the southern border. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

The Annie Merner Pfeiffer Chapel is seen on the campus of Bennett College in Greensboro, N.C. The college, one of two historically black colleges for women, is fighting to maintain its accreditation. Bennett College hide caption

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Bennett College

Facing Loss Of Accreditation Over Finances, Women's HBCU Raises Millions

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Former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke left the Trump administration amid unresolved ethics investigations. His department has been inundated by Freedom of Information requests and is now proposing a new rule which critics charge could limit transparency. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Interior Dept.'s Push To Limit Public Records Requests Draws Criticism

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