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Alex Jones, pictured in 2018, was sanctioned by a Connecticut judge on Tuesday after railing on the attorney representing victims' families in a defamation suit against the Internet provocateur. Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press

Flames consume a home in Paradise, Calif. PG&E will pay the town and other jurisdictions $1 billion for wildfire damages caused by its equipment. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

California Utility PG&E To Pay $1 Billion To Local Governments For Wildfire Damage

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Poncho Via stands on a field of grass in Clay County Alabama at the Green Acres Farm in 2017. The steer currently holds the Guinness World Record for having the longest set of horns ever. The Pope Family hide caption

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The Pope Family

Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., left and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. at a news conference with recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program (DACA) during a 2017 news conference. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Kyle Kashuv, a student survivor of the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, became a nationally prominent gun-rights advocate while many of his surviving classmates instead organized to advocate for gun control. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Harvard Rescinds Offer To Parkland Survivor After Discovery Of Racist Comments

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Gwen Lynch graduated 8th grade on Monday as the only student of a one-room public school on the tiny island of Cuttyhunk in Massachusetts. Hayley Fager/WCAI hide caption

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Hayley Fager/WCAI

On A Tiny Island, Comedian Delivers A Graduation Speech For One

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RVs sit parked on a street near Google's headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. Some longtime area residents and lower-paid Google workers have had to look for alternatives to paying steep rental costs. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Rowe for NPR

U.S. Schools Underreport How Often Students Are Restrained Or Secluded, Watchdog Says

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Officer Jonathan Aledda maintained that he mistook a toy truck for a firearm even though officers at the trial testified that radio communication had clarified that the toy was not a gun. North Miami Police Department via AP hide caption

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North Miami Police Department via AP

In California's Mojave Desert sits First Solar Inc.'s Desert Sunlight Solar Farm. California is among the states leading the decarbonization charge. Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Going 'Zero Carbon' Is All The Rage. But Will It Slow Climate Change?

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A southern resident orca whale swims in Puget Sound in view of Mount Rainier in 2014. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Whale Watchers Accused Of Loving Endangered Orcas To Death

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An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter takes off from the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln in the Red Sea. The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group was recently deployed to the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility as tensions between the U.S. and Iran escalate. On Monday, the State Department ordered additional troops to the Middle East. Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Amber Smalley/U.S. Navy via Getty Images hide caption

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Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Amber Smalley/U.S. Navy via Getty Images

A car passes by the vacant lot in modern-day Selma where the Silver Moon Cafe stood in 1965. The attack on the Rev. James Reeb occurred just outside the cafe. William Widmer for NPR hide caption

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William Widmer for NPR

Listen To Episode 6

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William Portwood, who died less than two weeks after NPR confirmed his involvement in the 1965 murder of Boston minister James Reeb, poses for a photograph in front of his home in Selma, Ala. Chip Brantley/NPR hide caption

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Chip Brantley/NPR

NPR Identifies 4th Attacker In Civil Rights-Era Cold Case

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