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Smoke was seen billowing from an Aramco facility in Abqaiq, Saudi Arabia, after it came under attack on Saturday. Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters hide caption

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Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters

U.S. Satellites Detected Iran Readying Weapons Ahead Of Saudi Strike, Officials Say

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The Justice Department says Edward Snowden, seen here via video feed, breached nondisclosure agreements he signed with the National Security Agency and CIA with the publication of his new memoir, Permanent Record. Juliet Linderman /AP hide caption

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Juliet Linderman /AP

Richard Stallman, pictured in 2015, resigned from his posts as President of the Free Software Foundation and visiting scientist at MIT's Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence lab. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

In this March 28 photo, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addresses a campaign rally in Meerut. One of his efforts as prime minister has been to construct millions of toilets to reduce open defecation. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

A man sets up portraits of North Korean defector Han Seong-ok and her 6-year-old son, who are believed to have died from starvation, at a makeshift shrine in downtown Seoul on Aug. 28. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

In South Korea, Anguish Over Deaths Of North Korean Defectors Who May Have Starved

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Eulalio Barrera Barrera's family was one of 6,000 to receive a monthly stipend funded by USAID that was cut off last month because of President Trump's foreign aid funding freeze. Like many families in the program, he spent the last cash on chickens. Tim McDonnell for NPR hide caption

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Tim McDonnell for NPR

NASA's Dragonfly mission will hop across Saturn's moon Titan, taking samples and photos. Johns Hopkins APL hide caption

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Johns Hopkins APL

Meet The Nuclear-Powered Self-Driving Drone NASA Is Sending To A Moon Of Saturn

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Sarah Thomas, a 37-year-old cancer survivor, swims across the 21-mile English Channel. She said she was stung on the face by a jellyfish during her epic swim, in which she crisscrossed the channel four times, a journey that ended up being more than 130 miles because of the tides. Jon Washer/AP hide caption

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Jon Washer/AP

President Trump waves before boarding Air Force One as he departs Albuquerque, N.M., en route to campaign events in California on Tuesday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Afghan police inspect the site of a bombing in Parwan province, where Afghan President Ashraf Ghani was speaking at a campaign rally. The Taliban has claimed responsibility for the attack. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

In Mumbai, some prosperous neighborhoods sit alongside slums. This year's Gates report on progress toward eliminating poverty notes that there is vast inequality not only between nations, but within many of them. @johnny_miller_photography hide caption

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@johnny_miller_photography

Crime Stoppers lets people call in anonymous tips to its programs across the United States. Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Do Cash Rewards For Crime Tips Work?

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Amish families go down a road in Lancaster, Pa., one on foot and the other by horse-drawn carriage. The high cost of farmland is driving some Amish people to move to where land is more affordable. DEA/G. ROLI/De Agostini via Getty Images hide caption

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DEA/G. ROLI/De Agostini via Getty Images

As Amish Leave Farming For Other Work, Some Leave Their Homestead

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A group gathers at the state capitol in Austin, Texas, in May to protest abortion restrictions. In defiance of the state's ban on city funding of abortion providers, the Austin City Council has found a workaround to help women seeking the procedure. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

As Texas Cracks Down On Abortion, Austin Votes To Help Women Defray Costs

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