Photography Photography

Dayanita Singh's Museum Bhavan contains nine accordion books that expand into a 7.5-foot-long gallery of black and white photographs. Bilal Qureshi hide caption

toggle caption
Bilal Qureshi

This Photographer Wants To Put A Museum In Your Pocket

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/601142938/601268234" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Hungarian-born French photographer Brassaï (born Gyula Halasz) is one of three photographers currently being featured at MOCA in Los Angeles. Baron/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Baron/Getty Images

3 Photographers Who Captured The Undersides Of Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/595610152/597863502" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Complex Story Of Civil Rights Photographer Ernest Withers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/597541648/597541649" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In a full-issue article on Australia that ran in National Geographic in 1916, aboriginal Australians were called "savages" who "rank lowest in intelligence of all human beings." The magazine examines its history of racist coverage in its April issue. C.P. Scott (L) and H.E. Gregory (R)/National Geographic hide caption

toggle caption
C.P. Scott (L) and H.E. Gregory (R)/National Geographic

Photographer Lorenzo Vitturi assembled this collage of products sold at the street market of Lagos Island, Nigeria, including the T-shirt that gave him the title for his new book: "Money Must Be Made." Lorenzo Vitturi hide caption

toggle caption
Lorenzo Vitturi

A young white rhino, drugged and blindfolded, is about to be released into the Okavango Delta in Botswana. It was relocated from South Africa to protect it from poachers. Neil Aldridge/World Press Photo hide caption

toggle caption
Neil Aldridge/World Press Photo

This is a sample photo taken with the 1-megapixel Quanta Image Sensor. Instead of pixels, QIS chips have what researchers call "jots." Each jot can detect a single particle of light. Jiaju Ma hide caption

toggle caption
Jiaju Ma

Super Sensitive Sensor Sees What You Can't

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/585149644/585540639" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kean, Subway Sandwich Artist by Shauna Frischkorn Shauna Frischkorn/Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery hide caption

toggle caption
Shauna Frischkorn/Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery

From Sandwich Shops To Cotton Mills, Art That Honors The American Worker

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/577714534/582338697" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Photojournalist Matt Black has traveled about 100,000 miles across 46 states to document what poverty looks like across the country for his project The Geography of Poverty. This photograph was taken in Sunflower County, Miss. Matt Black/Magnum Photos hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Black/Magnum Photos

'America From The Bottom': Documenting Poverty Across The Country

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/581269054/581269055" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman photographs inside the "Aftermath of Obliteration of Eternity" room during a preview of the Yayoi Kusama's "Infinity Mirrors" exhibit at the Hirshhorn Museum on Feb. 21, 2017 in Washington, D.C. Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images

Newly Discovered Andy Warhol Art Up For Auction

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567974853/567974854" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This is likely a pit toilet. The idea is that there's a giant hole underneath the toilet. It's from Revben and Havenes Banda's home in a rural village in Malawi. They live with their five children and five grandchildren; their monthly income is $50. Zoriah Miller for Dollar Street hide caption

toggle caption
Zoriah Miller for Dollar Street