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Patients in the study had "significantly lower out-of-pocket costs — on the average, $500 — when they visited a physical therapist first," says Bianca Frogner, a health economist at the University of Washington. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Trying Physical Therapy First For Low Back Pain May Curb Use Of Opioids

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Mike Stone, left, and Andy Sherman in the pumping station for Hannibal, Mo., during a flood in 1993. The city has since constructed a flood wall, and flood managers have built up levees to protect against flooding. But scientists warn those structures are making flooding worse. Cliff Schiappa/AP hide caption

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Cliff Schiappa/AP

Since early 2013, 110 chimpanzees have been retired to Chimp Haven sanctuary in Keithville, La., from the New Iberia Research Center in Lafayette, La. That's the largest group of government-owned chimps ever sent to sanctuary. Sabrina, seen here, arrived at Chimp Haven in 2013. Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society hide caption

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Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society

In the division of household tasks, one study shows that washing dishes is the category with the biggest discrepancy between men and women. Alex Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wilson/Getty Images

A southern white rhino named Victoria is two months pregnant. Barbara Durrant, director of reproductive sciences at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, announced the news on Thursday. Julie Watson/AP hide caption

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Julie Watson/AP

Austin Steeves packages lobsters after hauling traps on his grandfather's boat in Casco Bay, Portland, Maine. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Warming Waters Push Fish To Cooler Climes, Out Of Some Fishermen's Reach

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Herceptin has proved to be effective in prolonging the lives of the 12 percent of women with breast cancer whose malignancy hasn't spread to other organs, and whose cancer is HER2-positive. But side effects can be a problem. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

The prehensile tailed skink from the highlands of New Papua New Guinea has green blood due to high concentrations of the green bile pigment biliverdin. The green bile pigment in the blood overwhelms the intense crimson color of red blood cells resulting in a striking lime-green coloration of the muscles, bones, and mucosal tissues. Courtesy of Christopher C. Austin/LSU hide caption

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Courtesy of Christopher C. Austin/LSU

Why Do Some Lizards Have Green Blood?

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The planet, known as Kepler-452b, was believed to be about 60 percent larger than our planet and within the habitable zone of its star. NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle hide caption

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NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

Earth's 'Bigger, Older Cousin' Maybe Doesn't Even Exist

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If you're Southern, the macaroni and cheese with collard greens may taste better to you than to someone from another culture. Glasshouse Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Glasshouse Images/Getty Images

Dr. Paul Marik (left) discusses patient care with medical students and resident physicians during morning rounds at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital in 2014 in Norfolk, Va. Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Can A Cocktail Of Vitamins And Steroids Cure A Major Killer In Hospitals?

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The biggest fingerling salmon in this Alaskan fish hatchery are likely born to the biggest mothers. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

The Bigger The Mother Fish, The More Babies She Has

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Scientists say the lava from Kilauea's new eruption may continue to flow for months or even years. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Days, Weeks, Years? Scientists Say Hawaii Volcano Eruption Has No End In Sight

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Amanda Williammee and her daughter Taycee. Now a happy preschooler, the little girl was born with neonatal abstinence syndrome — a condition that includes opioid withdrawal symptoms like tremors, irritability, sleep problems and high-pitched crying. Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN

For Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, Best Care May Be Mom's Recovery

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Black-legged ticks, also known as deer ticks, can carry Lyme disease. Kenneth H Thomas/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Kenneth H Thomas/Science Source/Getty Images

Lyme Disease Is On The Rise Again. Here's How To Prevent It

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A CT-scan image of the skull of an ancient bird shows how one of the earliest bird beaks worked as a pincer, in the way beaks of modern birds do, but also had teeth left over from dinosaur ancestors. The animal, called Ichthyornis, lived around 100 million years ago in what is now North America. Michael Hanson and Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar/Nature Publishing Group hide caption

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Michael Hanson and Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar/Nature Publishing Group

How Did Birds Lose Their Teeth And Get Their Beaks? Study Offers Clues

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