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How Police Killings Lead To Poor Mental Health In The Black Community

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Some Animals Switching To Nocturnal Life

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'What The Eyes Don't See' In Flint

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Archaeological Site Reveals New Details About Georgia History

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What Detention And Separation Mean For Kids' Mental Health

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A gas flare is seen at a natural gas processing facility near Williston, N.D. in 2015. A new study says the amount of methane leaking is more than government estimates. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

Large Methane Leaks Threaten Perception Of 'Clean' Natural Gas

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Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke at his confirmation hearing last year. Congressional Democrats and a public watchdog group are calling for an ethics investigation into Zinke over a land deal between his family foundation and oil and gas company Halliburton. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Hepatitis C virus is typically transmitted through blood, but an infected person who spits at someone can run afoul of the law in some jurisdictions. James Cavallini/Science Source hide caption

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James Cavallini/Science Source

Puerto Rican residents received food and water from FEMA after Hurricane Maria, but many complained that some boxes were stuffed with candy and salty snacks, not meals. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A Miami-Dade County mosquito control worker sprays around a home in August 2016 in the Wynwood area of Miami. A University of Florida study recently identified the first known human case of the mosquito-borne Keystone virus. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

The northern white-cheeked gibbon is a critically endangered ape native to China, Vietnam and Laos. Scientists have discovered a new species of gibbon, now extinct, that lived in China as recently as 2,200 years ago. Joachim S. Müller/Flickr hide caption

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Joachim S. Müller/Flickr

Several circular herpes virus particles are seen near a cell membrane. Roseola herpes virus causes a childhood illness marked by skin rashes and now has been found in brains with Alzheimer's disease. NCI/Science Source hide caption

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NCI/Science Source

Researchers Find Herpes Viruses In Brains Marked By Alzheimer's Disease

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In these two two-cell mouse embryos, the surface of the embryos is outlined in orange, the DNA in the nucleus is indicated in blue and the activity of the LINE-1 gene is indicated via bright red spots. Ramalho-Santos lab/UCSF hide caption

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Ramalho-Santos lab/UCSF

Some DNA Dismissed As 'Junk' Is Crucial To Embryo Development

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Koko, the gorilla who became an ambassador to the human world through her ability to communicate, has died. She's seen here at age 4, telling psychologist Francine "Penny" Patterson (left) that she is hungry. In the center is June Monroe, an interpreter for the deaf at St. Luke's Church, who helped teach Koko. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

The Telstar 18 is the official match ball for the 2018 World Cup in Russia. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

The Science Behind The World Cup Ball

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Karin Bruwelheide handles an amputates limb that dates back to the Civil War. The bones were discovered by scientists at Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia. Scientists at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History have been analyzing the bones to learn more about them and who they may have belonged to. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Civil War Battlefield 'Limb Pit' Reveals Work Of Combat Surgeons

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