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The Colorado School of Mines has started the world's first Space Resources degree program. Professor Angel Abbud-Madrid conducts an online class from his offices in Golden, Colo. Dan Boyce for NPR hide caption

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Dan Boyce for NPR

Space Mining — Learning How To Fuel An Interplanetary Gas Station

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Philadelphia International is among more than a dozen major U.S. airports vulnerable to sea level rise. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Airports At Water's Edge Battle Rising Sea Levels

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A nanny goat and her kids near a popular campsite in Olympic National Park. The National Park Service wants to move goats to the North Cascades, where they are a native species. Ashley Ahearn for NPR hide caption

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Ashley Ahearn for NPR

Via Truck And Helicopter, Mountain Goats Find New Home

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This adult Anopheles gambiae mosquito — the kind that spreads malaria — was genetically modified as part of the study. Andrew Hammond hide caption

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Andrew Hammond

Mosquitoes Genetically Modified To Crash Species That Spreads Malaria

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Jean Couch, 75, perches on the edge of a chair at her home in Los Altos Hills, Calif. She teaches people the art of sitting in chairs without back pain. Erin Brethauer for NPR hide caption

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Erin Brethauer for NPR

Can't Get Comfortable In Your Chair? Here's What You Can Do

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Of parents who tell pollsters their teens have trouble sleeping, 23 percent say the kids are waking up at night worried about their social lives. A third are worried about school. All-night access to electronic devices only aggravates the problem, sleep scientists say. 3photo/Getty Images hide caption

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3photo/Getty Images
Cameron Pollack/NPR

How The Myers-Briggs Personality Test Began In A Mother's Living Room Lab

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Think you can get away with fewer than eight hours of sleep per night? Neuroscientist Matthew Walker says, think again. Sophie Blackall/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Sophie Blackall/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Radio Replay: Eyes Wide Open

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Drinking water samples from homes in southwestern Puerto Rico are tested at Interamerican University of Puerto Rico in San German. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Hersher/NPR

Puerto Rico's Tap Water Often Goes Untested, Raising Fears About Lead Contamination

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Immature human eggs (pink) were created by Japanese researchers using stem cells that were derived from blood cells. Courtesy of Saitou Lab hide caption

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Courtesy of Saitou Lab

Scientists Create Immature Human Eggs From Stem Cells

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The fix was in for this rhesus macaque drinking juice on the Ganges River in Rishikesh, Uttarakhand, India. No gambling was required to get the reward. Fotofeeling/Getty Images/Westend61 RM hide caption

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Fotofeeling/Getty Images/Westend61 RM

In Lab Turned Casino, Gambling Monkeys Help Scientists Find Risk-Taking Brain Area

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Friend or foe? A California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides) gives observers the eye at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory hide caption

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Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory

Octopuses Get Strangely Cuddly On The Mood Drug Ecstasy

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