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In 2018, Twitter released an archive of thousands of accounts that the platform determined were involved in potentially state-backed information campaigns. Since then, it has continued to make announcements of its efforts to remove accounts spreading disinformation. Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images

Adrian Lamo (center) walks out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., where Chelsea Manning's court-martial was held, on Dec. 20, 2011. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The Mysterious Death Of The Hacker Who Turned In Chelsea Manning

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announces the company's climate initiative Thursday at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Amazon hide caption

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Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Amazon

Amazon Makes 'Climate Pledge' As Workers Plan Walkout

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China isn't just the biggest trading partner of the United States. The head of the Justice Department's National Security Division says it's also the biggest counterintelligence threat. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

People Are Looking At Your LinkedIn Profile. They Might Be Chinese Spies

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Computer Scientists Work To Fix Easily Fooled AI

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Richard Stallman, pictured in 2015, resigned from his posts as president of the Free Software Foundation and visiting scientist at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Using AI In Malawi To Save Elephants

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NASA's Dragonfly mission will hop across Saturn's moon Titan, taking samples and photos. Johns Hopkins APL hide caption

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Johns Hopkins APL

Meet The Nuclear-Powered Self-Driving Drone NASA Is Sending To A Moon Of Saturn

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Sophistication Of Saudi Airstrike Points To Iranian Involvement

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MuralNet CEO Mariel Triggs installs broadband equipment on the Havasupai reservation. Tribal members Travis Hamibreek and Ophelia Watahomigie-Corliss can see the Wi-Fi signal on their phones. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Most Isolated Tribe In Continental U.S. Gets Broadband

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Philip Connors has spent 17 summers as a fire lookout in the Gila National Forest. Lookouts are the eyes in the forest, even as the forests they watch have changed, shaped by developers, shifting land management policies and climate change. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

More From Edward Snowden

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