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A woman poses for a smartphone photo at a booth for Chinese tech firm Tencent at the Global Mobile Internet Conference (GMIC) in Beijing, last year. Tencent was one of a number of tech companies singled out in a new report on gender discrimination in China. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Toronto Police: 10 Killed, 15 Others Injured In Van Attack

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China's Top Employers Routinely Publish Sexist Job Ads, Study Says

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Macron Welcomed To The U.S. But Faces Political Challenges In France

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Nicaraguan President Ortega Fights For His Political Future

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Herbert Diess, Volkswagen's new CEO addresses, the media during a news conference at the company's plant in Wolfsburg, Germany, April 13. As the company turns the page from its diesel emissions cheating scandal, it says its future is electric. Fabian Bimmer/Reuters hide caption

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Fabian Bimmer/Reuters

After Diesel Scandal, VW Turns To New Leadership And Electric Cars

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Mohammad Javad Zarif, the foreign minister of Iran, poses for a portrait. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Iran's Foreign Minister: Renegotiating Nuclear Deal Would Damage U.S. Credibility

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Toronto Police Say Suspect In Van Attack Not Associated With Any Terrorist Group

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How The French View Macron's U.S. Visit With President Trump

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With Failing Lungs, Survivor Of Suspected Chemical Attack In Syria Tells Her Story

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At Least 24 Dead After Riots In Nicaragua

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