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The trick, of course, is to find moments of deep relaxation wherever you are, not just on vacation. Laughing with friends can be another way to start breaking the cycle of chronic stress and help keep your heart healthy, too. stock_colors/Getty Images hide caption

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High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out

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Nurse practitioner Debra Brown guides patient Merdis Wells through a diabetic retinopathy exam at University Medical Center in New Orleans. Courtesy of IDx hide caption

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Courtesy of IDx

How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?

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More than 285 cases of the measles have been reported in New York since October. Nearly all are associated with people who live in the Williamsburg or Borough Park neighborhoods of Brooklyn. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Shara and Robert Watkins hold their 5-month-old daughter, Kaiya, in their home in San Mateo, Calif., just after she had woken up from an afternoon nap. Lindsey Moore/KQED hide caption

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Lindsey Moore/KQED

Prenatal Testing Can Ease Minds Or Heighten Anxieties

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A new treatment for allergies is gaining popularity. Sublingual immunotherapy works to tame the immune response, much like allergy shots. Getty Images hide caption

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Seasonal Sniffles? Immunotherapy Tablets Catch On As An Alternative To Allergy Shots

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If a doctor's office is like Blockbuster, Hims feels more like Netflix. It's a way to skip the long waits and crowds and get generic Viagra, hair growth treatment and other medicine and vitamins with minimal interaction with a health care provider — for better and worse. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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The presence of the hepatitis C virus in donated hearts and organs for transplantation wasn't an impediment for a successful result for recipients. Kateryna Kon/Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Getty Images

Hepatitis C Not A Barrier For Organ Transplantation, Study Finds

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Surprise bills happen when patients go to a hospital they think is in their insurance network but are seen by doctors or specialists who aren't. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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A certified nursing assistant wipes Neva Shinkle's face with chlorhexidine, an antimicrobial wash. Shinkle is a patient at Coventry Court Health Center, a nursing home in Anaheim, Calif., that is part of a multicenter research project aimed at stopping the spread of MRSA and CRE — two types of bacteria resistant to most antibiotics. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

"The optimist in me says in three years we can train this tool to read mammograms as well as an average radiologist," says Connie Lehman, chief of breast imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

Training A Computer To Read Mammograms As Well As A Doctor

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Oily fish such as salmon, sardines and lake trout, as well as some plant sources such as walnuts and flaxseed, can be good, tasty sources of omega-3 fatty acids. MinoruM/Getty Images hide caption

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MinoruM/Getty Images

Eating Fish May Help City Kids With Asthma Breathe Better

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Female mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood detect people partly by using a special olfactory receptor to home in on our sweat. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

How Mosquitoes Sniff Out Human Sweat To Find Us

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Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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A female adult head louse clings to a hair plucked from a human scalp. The brown line visible inside the insect, on the left side of its body, is its last blood meal. Lice typically eat a few times a day. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED

After a sports injury, Esteban Serrano owed $829.41 for a knee brace purchased with insurance through his doctor's office. He says he found the same kind of brace selling for less than $250 online. Paula Andalo/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Paula Andalo/Kaiser Health News

Soccer-Playing Engineer Calls Foul On Pricey Knee Brace

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Scientists are questioning the evidence about an alleged attack on diplomats at the U.S. Embassy in Havana. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Doubts Rise About Evidence That U.S. Diplomats In Cuba Were Attacked

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Angie Wang for NPR