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DNA isolated from a small sample of saliva or blood can yield information, fairly inexpensively, about a person's relative risk of developing dozens of diseases or medical conditions. GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images

Proposed Abortion Restrictions Would Hit Young Patients Hardest

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An X-ray of Sherry Young's foot shows the four implanted screws — each of which cost more than a high-end computer. Courtesy of Sherry Young hide caption

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Courtesy of Sherry Young

Planned Parenthood's affiliated clinics, like this one in Chicago, provide wellness exams and comprehensive contraceptive services, as well as screenings for cancer and sexually transmitted diseases for both women and men. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Aimovig, a new kind of migraine drug, is injected once a month. The medicine reduced the number of migraines in clinical studies reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration. Amgen/AP hide caption

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Amgen/AP

Herceptin has proved to be effective in prolonging the lives of the 12 percent of women with breast cancer whose malignancy hasn't spread to other organs, and whose cancer is HER2-positive. But side effects can be a problem. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Nicotine, heavy metals and tiny particles that can harm the lungs have been found in e-cigarette aerosol, according to the surgeon general. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
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'Reluctant Psychonaut' Michael Pollan Embraces The 'New Science' Of Psychedelics

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Swallowing disorders are becoming more common. Some chefs are now whipping up nutritious recipes that are not only easy on the throat, but help restore the joy of eating. Left: Pureed satay chicken with edamame, shaped into the form of a drumstick. Right: Pureed fruit and yogurt set with agar agar — Australian chef Peter Morgan-Jones calls it an ideal finger food for those with dysphagia. Matt Jewell/HammondCare hide caption

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Matt Jewell/HammondCare

Eleven days after surgery on her shoulder and foot, Sherry Young of Lawton, Okla., got a letter from her insurance plan saying that it hadn't approved her hospital stay. The letter "put me in a panic," says Young. The $115,000-plus bill for the hospital stay was about how much Young's home is worth, and five times her annual income. Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News

Sticker Shock Jolts Oklahoma Patient: $15,076 For 4 Tiny Screws

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If you're Southern, the macaroni and cheese with collard greens may taste better to you than to someone from another culture. Glasshouse Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Glasshouse Images/Getty Images

Patients with private insurance like the drug coupons because they can help make specialty medicines more affordable. But health care analysts say the coupons may also discourage patients from considering appropriate lower-cost alternatives, including generic drugs. DNY59/Getty Images hide caption

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DNY59/Getty Images

A pharmacist speaks with a customer at Walmart Neighborhood Market in Bentonville, Ark., in 2014. On Monday Walmart introduced a new set of guidelines for dispensing opioid medications. Sarah Bentham/AP hide caption

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Sarah Bentham/AP

Seema Verma told hospital executives that she wants states to have flexibility in how they administer Medicaid, but there are limits. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Administration Rejects Proposal For Lifetime Medicaid Cap

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The Surgeon General recommends more Americans carry naloxone, the opioid overdose antidote. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Reversing An Overdose Isn't Complicated, But Getting The Antidote Can Be

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Black-legged ticks, also known as deer ticks, can carry Lyme disease. Kenneth H Thomas/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Kenneth H Thomas/Science Source/Getty Images

Lyme Disease Is On The Rise Again. Here's How To Prevent It

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