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Scientists around the world criticized Chinese researcher He Jiankui's experimental editing of DNA in embryos that became twin girls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

Hesitancy about vaccination in a community has a lot to do with acculturation to its norms. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

Medical Anthropologist Explores 'Vaccine Hesitancy'

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A Neuroscientist Explores The Biology Of Addiction In 'Never Enough'

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New recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force call for doctors to identify patients at risk of depression during pregnancy or after childbirth and refer them to counseling. Adene Sanchez/Getty Images hide caption

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Adene Sanchez/Getty Images

To Prevent Pregnancy-Related Depression, At-Risk Women Advised To Get Counseling

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The 'Strange Science' Behind The Big Business Of Exercise Recovery

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Pastry chef Katlyn Beggs and chef Patrick Mulvaney plan desserts for an upcoming dinner at his B&L restaurant in the Midtown neighborhood of Sacramento, Calif. Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

If you fear your child may have taken or received too much medicine, call the national poison control hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Giving Medicine To Young Children? Getting The Dose Right Is Tricky

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In Mexican border towns, big discount drugstores, as well as small pharmacies like this one in Tijuana, market their less expensive medicines to American tourists. Guillermo Arias/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/Bloomberg via Getty Images

American Travelers Seek Cheaper Prescription Drugs In Mexico And Beyond

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Measles is a highly contagious illness that can cause serious health problems, including brain damage, deafness and, in rare cases, death. Vaccination can prevent measles infections. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Defying Parents, A Teen Decides To Get Vaccinated

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Amber Gorrow and her daughter, Eleanor, 3, pick out a show to watch after Eleanor's nap at their home in Vancouver, Wash., on Wednesday. Eleanor has gotten her first measles vaccine, but Gorrow's son, Leon, 8 weeks, is still too young to be immunized. Alisha Jucevic/Getty Images hide caption

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Alisha Jucevic/Getty Images

Measles Cases Mount In Pacific Northwest Outbreak

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Person undergoing a CAT scan in hospital with PET scan equipment. Emerging studies report findings of brain deterioration in females to be slower than that of males'. Johnny Greig/Getty Images hide caption

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Johnny Greig/Getty Images

Scans Show Female Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down

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Ariel Davis for NPR

If You're Often Angry Or Irritable, You May Be Depressed

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Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar delivers remarks to reporters while participating in a roundtable about health care prices at the White House on Jan. 23. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Dieter Egli, a developmental biologist at Columbia University, and Katherine Palmerola examine a newly fertilized egg injected with a CRISPR editing tool. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

New U.S. Experiments Aim To Create Gene-Edited Human Embryos

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Frank Lettiere's eyebrows and eyelashes froze after his walk along Lake Michigan's Chicago shoreline Wednesday. Frostbite warnings were issued for parts of the U.S. Midwest as temperatures plunged. Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

Medical Effects Of Extreme Cold: Why It Hurts And How To Stay Safe

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A British study found that people who used e-cigarettes to quit smoking were more successful than those who tried nicotine patches and gum. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Study Found Vaping Beat Traditional Smoking-Cessation Options

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"There's a certain notion that e-cigarettes are harmless," says Dr. Paul Ndunda, an assistant professor at the School of Medicine at the University of Kansas in Wichita. "But ... while they're less harmful than normal cigarettes, their use still comes with risks." RyanJLane/Getty Images hide caption

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Ariel Davis for NPR

From Fruit Fly To Stink Eye: Searching For Anger's Animal Roots

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Matt Gleason fainted at work after getting a flu shot, so colleagues called 911 and an ambulance took him to the ER. Eight hours later, Gleason went home with a clean bill of health. Later still he got a hefty bill that wiped out his deductible. Logan Cyrus for KHN hide caption

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Logan Cyrus for KHN

A Fainting Spell After A Flu Shot Leads To $4,692 ER Visit

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To tame your anger, it may help to take time to observe and name it. Ariel Davis for NPR hide caption

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Ariel Davis for NPR

Got Anger? Try Naming It To Tame It

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Skeletal muscle cells from a rabbit were stained with fluorescent markers to highlight cell nuclei (blue) and proteins in the cytoskeleton (red and green). Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source hide caption

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Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source