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John Bogle, founder of The Vanguard Group, died on Wednesday at the age of 89. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Jack Bogle, Father Of Simple Investing, Dies At 89

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Federal workers wait for food distribution to begin Saturday at a pop-up food bank in Rockville, Md. The Capital Area Food Bank is distributing free food to government employees during the shutdown. Ian Stewart/NPR hide caption

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Ian Stewart/NPR

Federal Workers Struggle To Stretch Their Money As Shutdown Lingers

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Boost Your Credit Card IQ

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Never Pay An Unnecessary Fee Again

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A "for sale" sign is seen in front of a home in Miami on Jan. 24, 2018. The partial shutdown of the federal government is causing some financial problems for furloughed workers who can't refinance their mortgages or buy homes because lenders can't verify their income. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Some Mortgage Deals Are In Limbo As Government Shutdown Drags On

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While some new drugs entering the market are driving up prices for consumers, drug companies are also hiking prices on older drugs. Sigrid Olsson/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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