Hidden Brain The Hidden Brain helps curious people understand the world – and themselves. Using science and storytelling, Hidden Brain's host Shankar Vedantam reveals the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, the biases that shape our choices, and the triggers that direct the course of our relationships.

Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images David McNew/ AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/ AFP/Getty Images

The Weight of Our Words

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/601524253/604443641" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

You 2.0: Dream Jobs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/634047154/634082518" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jana Mestecky (left) poses for a cast photo during production of the play Des rats et des hommes, directed by Israel Horovitz (front, third from left). The photo appeared in the French magazine, L'Avant-Scène, in 1994. Courtesy of Jana Mestecky hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Jana Mestecky

Why Now?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/633199277/633231229" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
JGI/Jamie Grill/Getty Images/Blend Images

You 2.0: Rebel With A Cause

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/631524581/631682420" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Muslim women praying together in the Istiqlal mosque in Jakarta, Indonesia. Afriadi Hikmal/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Afriadi Hikmal/Getty Images

Creating God

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/628792048/631472052" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A young Maya Shankar. Courtesy of Maya Shankar hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Maya Shankar

Fresh Starts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/627635045/628003740" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Nick Shepherd/Getty Images/Ikon Images

The Edge Effect

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/625426015/627733953" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Who Gets Power — And Why It Can Corrupt Even The Best Of Us

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624607771/624694078" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Mike Powell/Getty Images

Baseball Umpires Don't Get Overtime. Does That Affect Extra Innings?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624165205/624165206" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Nora Carol Photography/Nora Carol Photography/AFP/Getty Images

Fake News: An Origin Story

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/623231337/623334602" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rates of "summer melt" are highest for students from lower-income backgrounds, especially if their own parents didn't go through the college application process. Hill Street Studios/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hill Street Studios/Getty Images/Blend Images

Summer Melt: Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/621023537/623286435" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"Nostalgia is memory with the pain removed." - Jim Holliday Gpointstudio/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

toggle caption
Gpointstudio/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Looking Back: Reflecting On The Past To Understand The Present

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/607757718/619990903" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The clicker became a popular tool for dog training in the 1980s. Today, it has also caught on with humans — helping people to become better dancers, fishermen, golfers, and now, surgeons. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Hsieh/NPR

When Everything Clicks: The Power Of Judgment-Free Learning

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/616127481/616897281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers say a new study suggests moms are more likely to say they see themselves in their daughters, and fathers are more likely to say they see themselves in their sons. Tom Werner/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Werner/Getty Images

Admit It, Parents: You Play Favorites With The Kids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/615718541/615718544" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Want your kid to succeed? Don't try so hard. sturti/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
sturti/Getty Images

The Carpenter Vs. The Gardener: Two Models Of Modern Parenting

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/614054515/614517459" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After a long history of civil war and corruption, many Liberians didn't trust their government's attempts to control Ebola. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Don't Panic! What We Can Learn From Chaos

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/613831952/614195053" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Laura Ogden, Jack Hannan, and Dr. Jones the dog. Courtesy of Laura Ogden hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Laura Ogden

Rewinding & Rewriting: The Alternate Universes in Our Heads

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612458913/613127761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Phillip Waterman/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Radio Replay: This Is Your Brain On Ads

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612037491/612355713" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript