NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Morning Edition

Texas Governor Holds Discussion After School Shooting

Corrected on May 23, 2018

A previous version of this story and Web introduction incorrectly identified Dallas Schools Superintendent Michael Hinojosa as the superintendent of Dallas County Schools.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Texas Community Comes To Terms With Latest School Shooting

Corrected on May 22, 2018

A previous Web introduction to this story incorrectly said Scott Simon spoke with Jennifer Jones, the mother of a former student at Santa Fe High School. Simon's conversation was with NPR correspondent John Burnett.

Weekend Edition Saturday

10 Killed When Gunman Opens Fire In Texas High School

Corrected on May 19, 2018

A previous introduction to this audio incorrectly said nine students and one teacher died. The victims were eight students and two teachers. In addition, it incorrectly said the school was in Galveston, Texas. It is located in Santa Fe.

Ask Me Another

Diane Guerrero: Most Likely To Be Superlative

Corrected on May 18, 2018

In the audio of this segment, we incorrectly said Guerrero's book's subtitle is "Home, Loss and Hope." The correct subtitle is "Loss, Hope and Home."

Morning Edition

MSU Interim President On Nassar Settlement

Corrected on May 17, 2018

In an earlier version of this report, Michigan State University was mistakenly referred to as the University of Michigan. Also, Michigan State's interim president, John Engler, was mistakenly referred to as Jim Engler.

How A Drugmaker Gamed The System To Keep Generic Competition Away

Corrected on May 17, 2018

An earlier version of this report said that David Mitchell believed a generic version of Revlimid could have been on the market in February. It is more accurate to say Mitchell believed a generic version could have been on the market well before this year.

Judge Overturns Assisted Suicide Law In California

Corrected on May 16, 2018

A previous version of this story misidentified Alexandra Snyder of the Life Legal Defense Foundation as Alexander Snyder. Additionally, the Snyder group was wrongly named the Life Legal Defense Foundations.

Criminal Complaints And Industry Investigations Target Tidal

Corrected on May 14, 2018

A previous version of this article stated that Koda, the Danish composers organization, filed a report with Okokrim, a Danish prosecuting and police authority. It is TONO, the Norwegian composers, lyricists and music publishers society, that has filed a report with Okokrim, which is the Norwegian National Authority for Investigation and Prosecution of Economic and Environmental Crime.

Understanding The Map Of Jerusalem, Or Trying To

Corrected on May 14, 2018

An earlier version of this story called the building where the U.S. Embassy will be located a consulate. It is a wing of the U.S. Consulate in Jerusalem, which is at a different location.

Morning Edition

Questions Raised About Study Of Device To Ease Opioid Withdrawal

Corrected on May 11, 2018

An earlier version of this story didn't make clear that James' treatment with the Bridge in December 2017 took place after the publication of the study in the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse in March 2017. This story has been updated to clarify that James didn't know his data were being collected for additional research into whether the device works.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Puzzle: IN D Mood For A Game?

Corrected on May 10, 2018

In the weekly challenge, we ask for the name of a type of criminal. The answer, pyromaniac, is derived from pyromania, which is more accurately described as a disorder, not a crime.

In The Coal Counties Of Central Appalachia, Will Trump's Promises Come True?

Corrected on May 9, 2018

A previous version of this story misspelled Susan Stancill's last name as Stancil. Additionally, a previous Web version incorrectly said Derek Akal's grandfather was a sharecropper who migrated from Alabama. In fact, it was Akal's great-grandfather who was an agricultural worker in Alabama when he migrated to eastern Kentucky. And the previous Web version also incorrectly said Akal wished to pursue a music career.

All Things Considered

Japan, China And South Korea To Meet For Talks In Tokyo

Corrected on May 8, 2018

A previous Web introduction to this story incorrectly said that the meeting between Japan, China and South Korea was taking place on Tuesday. The meeting is on Wednesday.

Republican Fears About Holding The Senate Start To Sink In

Corrected on May 7, 2018

An earlier version of this story referred to Don Blankenship as a convicted felon. In fact, he was convicted of a misdemeanor. The fundraising numbers for Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Pa., have also been corrected.

All Things Considered

Chloe And Halle Bailey Are More Than 'Alright'

Corrected on May 7, 2018

A previous version of this story stated that the Chloe and Halle's cover of "Best Thing I Never Had" caught Beyoncé 's attention. The cover was to the song "Pretty Hurts."

All Things Considered

70 Years Later, Memorial Held For Unarmed Black Man Fatally Shot By Police

Corrected on May 7, 2018

In this story, an incomplete identification is given for the Restorative Justice Project at Northeastern University School of Law. Its full name is the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project at Northeastern University School of Law.

India Reforms Its Anti-Rape Laws — To Mixed Reaction

Corrected on May 5, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that under a new law, anyone convicted of raping a child 12 or younger would get the death penalty. It is not an automatic sentence. In addition, the story also incorrectly linked the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act to the rape and death of 21-year-old student on a bus.

Weekend Edition Saturday

The Fortnite Craze Might Be Here To Stay

Corrected on May 5, 2018

A previous version of this story misspelled the last name of Joost van Dreunen, the CEO of Superdata Research, as van Dreuner. In addition, the story incorrectly reported that Skyler Holman's first name was Skyla.

All Things Considered

1,500 Hawaii Residents Ordered To Evacuate As Volcano Erupts

Corrected on May 4, 2018

A previous Web introduction to this story incorrectly said NPR's Audie Cornish spoke with Hawaii Public Radio's Derrick Malama. Cornish actually spoke with Mileka Lincoln of Hawaii News Now.

Trump And Pence Address NRA Amid Tense Gun Debate

Corrected on May 4, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly said the series of attacks on the Bataclan concert hall and other Paris venues took place in 2016. The attacks took place in November 2015. Additionally, a previous correction misspelled Bataclan as Baraclan.

Homes Or Gardens? Developers And Urban Farmers Grapple Over Vacant Land

Corrected on May 4, 2018

An earlier version of this story said the farm at Marcus Garvey Village is owned by Project Eats. While Project Eats runs the farm, it is owned by L + M Development Partners. In addition, the story incorrectly said residents will lose access to fresh produce from the farm. L +M says it has committed to giving Project Eats a new plot to farm.

Morning Edition

Cokie Roberts On The History Of The EPA

Corrected on May 3, 2018

We incorrectly say President Richard Nixon signed the Clean Water Act. In fact, Nixon vetoed the act and was then overriden by Congress.

Lin-Manuel Miranda's Latest Hamildrop Features Many Elizas

Corrected on May 3, 2018

A previous version of this story and headline mischaracterized this version of the song "Burn" as including vocals from all of the actors who had previously portrayed Elizabeth Hamilton. In fact, it does not include Phillipa Soo, who portrayed Elizabeth during Hamilton's original Broadway run.

Texas, 6 Other States Sue Trump Administration, Seeking An End To DACA

Corrected on May 2, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program as protecting about 700 young immigrants from deportation. The number is about 700,000. Additionally, the story implied that young people brought to the U.S. as of 2012 would be allowed to stay; to be eligible, applicants must have been younger than 31 when the program began in 2012.

All Things Considered

#MeToo Founder Tarana Burke Responds To R. Kelly

Corrected on May 1, 2018

A previous version of this story stated that an R. Kelly concert in Chicago on Apr. 28 was canceled. It was a performance scheduled for May 5 that has been canceled by promoters.

Time's Up Joins Call To Shut Down R. Kelly

Corrected on May 1, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly said the canceled R. Kelly show in Chicago was scheduled for last Friday. The show was actually scheduled for May 5.

Facebook To Offer Users Opt-Outs That Comply With New European Privacy Rules

Corrected on April 27, 2018

A previous version of this story included a section from a TechCrunch report that named specific companies involved in scraping user data via the "Login With Facebook" feature. TechCrunch has since corrected its report. Additionally, the story referred to former Facebook operations manager Sandy Parakilas as "she"; Parakilas is a man.

All Things Considered

ISIS Bombing Targets Afghan Polling Station

Corrected on April 23, 2018

A previous headline incorrectly said the polling station bombing was carried out by the Taliban. It was an ISIS attack.

'Smallville' Actress Charged With Sex Trafficking

Corrected on April 21, 2018

This story has been edited to remove a reference to Richard Branson, who was reported as someone who had supported NXIVM in the past. A spokesperson for Branson said, "There is no association between Keith Raniere and Sir Richard Branson and Sir Richard has no recollection of ever taking part in a seminar hosted by NXIVM. Clare and Sara Bronfman did hire Necker Island several years ago and we understand they hosted a gathering for team members of NXIVM. The island is available for hire by the public and this was one of many gatherings held on the island over the years by various groups from across the world. Sir Richard was not aware of any of the allegations against NXIVM or its leader whatsoever and did not himself host any intensive courses for the group."

Weekend Edition Saturday

Why Do Russian Journalists Keep Falling?

Corrected on April 21, 2018

In the audio of this story, as well as in an earlier Web version, lawyer Nikolai Gorokhov is incorrectly described as being in a coma. He has recovered from his March 2017 fall.

All Things Considered

Behind 'Ear Hustle,' The Podcast Made In Prison

Corrected on April 19, 2018

In the audio, as in a previous Web version of this story, we incorrectly refer to Radiotopia as a distributor of podcasts. It is, in fact, a podcast network from PRX.

All Things Considered

50 Years After Johnny Cash, Los Tigres Del Norte Perform At Folsom Prison

Corrected on April 19, 2018

An early version of this story included a Web introduction that incorrectly said members of Los Tigres del Norte were the first free musicians to play at the Folsom Prison since 1968. The group was the first major Latin band to perform at the prison since 1968.

Not Enough Color In American Art Museums

Corrected on April 19, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Colin Mackenzie is in charge of the Art Institute of Chicago's Asian art collection. He is the curator of Chinese art. It also incorrectly referred to the Association of Art Museum Directors as the American Association of Museum Directors.

Senate Bill Aims to Broaden Access To Hearing Services

Corrected on April 19, 2018

An earlier version of this story mischaracterized the legislation proposed by Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Rand Paul, suggesting that it would allow Medicare to pay audiologists to teach beneficiaries how to adjust to and use their hearing aids. In fact, the bill would allow Medicare beneficiaries to visit an audiologist to get a hearing test to diagnose a hearing problem without a referral. It does not expand the scope of hearing health benefits covered by Medicare.

Bump Stock Manufacturer Is Shutting Down Production

Corrected on April 18, 2018

A previous photo caption incorrectly said Slide Fire would stop taking orders for bump stocks on May 20, 2017. The cutoff is actually next month. Additionally, FosTecH Outdoors was misspelled as FosTecH Ourtdoors.

Morning Edition

Is Netflix On Its Way To World Domination Of Streaming?

Corrected on April 18, 2018

In the audio version of this story, we say that Netflix won its first Academy Award for the documentary Icarus, but in fact Netflix had won an Academy Award in 2017 for the short film White Helmets. Also, we say Netflix added close to 7.5 million subscribers this week. In fact, it added them during the first quarter of the year.

Morning Edition

Acclaimed Movie Director Milos Forman Dies At 86

Corrected on April 16, 2018

In an earlier version of this report, we said Amadeus was filmed in a newly independent Czech Republic. In fact, when the movie was released in 1984, Czechoslovakia was still one nation. It split into the Czech and Slovak republics in 1993.

One-Third Of Everest Deaths Are Sherpa Climbers

Corrected on April 16, 2018

A person previously quoted in this story incorrectly stated that Tenzing Norgay, the late Sherpa climber, was not literate and could not sign his autograph. In fact, Norgay could read and write and signed many autographs. The quote has been removed.

The Week In News, In Verse

Corrected on April 14, 2018

A caption in a previous version of this story incorrectly gave Rod Rosenstein's first name as Rob.

Fresh Air

First-Ever Evictions Database Shows: 'We're In the Middle Of A Housing Crisis'

Corrected on April 14, 2018

In the audio of this story, and in a previous Web version, it is incorrectly implied that there are about 3,000 traffic fatalities per day in the U.S. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports there were 37,461 fatalities caused by car crashes in 2016, or about 103 per day.

Facebook Will Stop Funding Opposition To A User Privacy Initiative In California

Corrected on April 13, 2018

An earlier version of this post characterized Facebook's withdrawal of funds as indicating it would no longer oppose the privacy initiative. Facebook says the initiative is flawed and hopes the California Legislature "will work out a strong solution to provide consumers the right to know what information is being collected and the ability to decide whether their information may be sold."

Did Fake News On Facebook Help Elect Trump? Here's What We Know

Corrected on April 11, 2018

A previous version of this story stated that the Ohio State study looked at survey responses from 585 voters who claimed to have swung from Obama in 2012 to Trump in 2016. In fact, the voters surveyed said they voted for Obama in 2012 but did not necessarily vote for Trump in 2016.

The Taiwan Travel Act Threatens To Further Complicate U.S., China Relations

Corrected on April 11, 2018

The Democratic Progressive Party took power in Taiwan in 2016, A previous version of this story incorrectly called it the Diplomatic Progressive Party.

Corrected on April 10, 2018: A previous version of this story incorrectly said that the U.S. had pledged in the Three Joint Communiques agreement to maintain the Chinese position regarding Taiwan. The U.S. acknowledges China's position but made no such pledge.

Palestinian Journalist Fatally Shot While Covering Gaza Protest

Corrected on April 8, 2018

Israel said its troops fired tear gas, rubber bullets and live fire to prevent masses from crossing into Israel and in order to protect its border fence and soldiers. An earlier version of this story was incorrect when it said that Israel said Palestinians fired the tear gas, rubber bullets and live fire.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Armed At Church: Why This Congregation Is 'Not A Gun-Free Zone'

Corrected on April 8, 2018

A previous version of this story and the audio version of this story stated that parishioners at the Lighthouse Mexico Church Of God had been carrying and were encouraged to carry concealed weapons since 2013, after a shooting massacre at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. In fact, that shooting occurred in 2015.

Weekend Edition Saturday

What We Mean When We Talk About 'Suburban Women Voters'

Corrected on April 7, 2018

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said Georgia's 2017 special congressional election was in May. The election was in April, and the runoff was in June.

Could You Fight Off Worms? Depends On Your Gut Microbes

Corrected on April 7, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly said nearly 25 percent of the world's population is infected with parasitic worms like hookworm, ringworm or roundworm. In fact, the examples are hookworm, roundworm and whipworm.

Morning Edition

In Florida, Cities Challenge State On Gun Regulation Laws

Corrected on April 2, 2018

In a previous Web version of this story, Skip Campbell was incorrectly identified as the mayor of Coral Gables, Fla. He's actually the mayor of Coral Springs, Fla. Additionally, in the audio version, as in the previous Web version, we say some cities are considering bans on high-capacity magazine clips. We should have said high-capacity magazines.

Pope To World: Hell Does Exist

Corrected on March 30, 2018

An earlier version of this post incorrectly described Easter as "the day celebrating the idea that Jesus did not die and go to hell or purgatory or anywhere at all, but rather arose into heaven."

All Things Considered

Parkland Student: March Was 'Just The Start'

Corrected on March 28, 2018

A previous Web version of this story said Jennifer Hudson sang "A Change is Gonna Come" during Saturday's "March for Our Lives." "The Times They Are a-Changin' " is the actual song title.

All Things Considered

After 25 Years, Taking A Look At The Impact Of 'Raw' on WWE

Corrected on March 28, 2018

In an earlier version of this story, we incorrectly said that Raw was on USA Network for the past 25 years. In fact, it was on TNN/Spike TV from 2000 to 2005 before returning to the USA Network.

4 Feel-Good Stories Of The Final 4, From Sister Jean To Cool Cops In Kansas

Corrected on March 27, 2018

In a previous version of this story, we said a $25 Sister Jean bobblehead is selling for $500 on eBay. In fact, someone has listed an older version of a Sister Jean bobblehead with an asking price of $500. A new version of the bobblehead, costing $25, is due to be available in June.

Morning Edition

Birth Control Apps Find A Big Market In 'Contraception Deserts'

Corrected on March 27, 2018

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly suggest that Llano, Texas, has only one doctor. In fact, there are about a dozen physicians there, and most of them provide primary care.

Final 4: Kansas, Villanova, Michigan And Loyola-Chicago Survive And Advance

Corrected on March 26, 2018

An earlier version of this story referred to Michigan State, which won the championship in 1989. An earlier version of this story, and correction, also incorrectly noted that Michigan has won 14 championships. It has won 14 Big Ten conference championships, but only one national championship.

All Things Considered

A NASA Astronaut Stays In Orbit With SpaceX And Boeing

Corrected on March 26, 2018

A previous version of the Web story said Sunita Williams holds the record for total cumulative spacewalk time by a female astronaut. In fact, though she once held the record, that record has been surpassed.

Black And Latino Children Are Often Overlooked When It Comes To Autism

Corrected on March 26, 2018

In an earlier version of this story we referred to autism spectrum disorder as a disease. We have dropped that reference after receiving guidance from several readers that the term disease can be offensive, implying that autism is something that can be prevented or cured. The preferred language for many is condition, disorder or neurodevelopmental difference.

Weekend Edition Saturday

How A Famous Fraud Brought A Kind Of Hope In 'I Was Anastasia'

Corrected on March 24, 2018

In the audio version of this interview, Alexander Kerensky is incorrectly identified as a Bolshevik leader. Kerensky was not a Bolshevik; he was briefly prime minister of the Russian provisional government in 1917.

Elon Musk To Facebook: Mmm ... K, Bye

Corrected on March 23, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Facebook bought Instagram in 2014. The acquisition took place in 2012.

John Bolton's Curious Appearance In A Russian Gun Rights Video

Corrected on March 22, 2018

A previous version of this story mistakenly said the NRA "declined" wrongdoing with regard to a reported FBI investigation of whether a Russian politician illegally funneled money through the group to assist the 2016 Trump campaign. The NRA has denied wrongdoing in that case.

Morning Edition

Justices Appear Skeptical Of Calif. Law Challenged By Anti-Abortion Centers

Corrected on March 22, 2018

An earlier version of this report said licensed pregnancy centers that do not have a full range of services must provide written notice that the state provides free or low-cost access to prenatal and delivery services, birth control and abortion. Although the California Medicaid program does cover labor and delivery costs, that is not specified in the written notification requirement.

All Things Considered

Civil Rights Chief At HHS Defends The Right To Refuse Care On Religious Grounds

Corrected on March 22, 2018

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly reported that Roger Severino said in an interview that the mission of his division at HHS includes supporting health care workers who object to gender reassignment surgery. He only said that the division would focus on abortion and assisted suicide.

Illinois Primary: Democratic Congressman Wins Tight Race, GOP Governor Survives

Corrected on March 20, 2018

A previous version of this report contained these errors: Rep. Rodney Davis was incorrectly identified as Randy, Rep. Dan Lipinksi's district was incorrectly referred to as the 13th district (it is the 3rd), Sean Casten was incorrectly identified as Sean Caten and Richard Gonzalez was incorrectly identified as Richard Gonzales.

Weekend Edition Sunday

The Call-In: Knowing Sexual Harassers

Corrected on March 20, 2018

In an earlier version of this report, Harvey Weinstein was referred to as a rapist. While he has been accused of rape and other sexual assaults, he has not been convicted of any such crimes.

Ask Me Another

Memorabilia For Real, Ya?

Corrected on March 19, 2018

In the original broadcast of this game, we said, "It's a genuine Veg-O-Matic from Ron Popeil, donated by his daughter after his death." Ron Popeil is not dead. The Veg-O-Matic is from inventor Samuel Popeil – Samuel's daughter Lisa donated the Veg-O-Matic after her father's death. Samuel Popeil's son, Ron Popeil, who founded Ronco Inventions and popularly marketed the device, is still alive.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Habibi Fuses Farsi Lyrics With Western Riffs

Corrected on March 18, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to habibi as a Farsi word. The word is in fact Arabic. Jamalifard says it is commonly used in Iran.

Kentucky Votes To Ban Child Marriage

Corrected on March 17, 2018

An earlier version of this story referred to the Family Foundation based in Virginia. The story should have referred to the Kentucky Family Foundation.

In addition, an earlier version of the graphic incorrectly indicated that the minimum age to marry in New York is 14. It was recently raised to 17. Also, the graphic did not make clear that there are exceptions to the minimum age for marriage for court-emancipated minors in Texas and Virginia.

iHeartMedia Turns The Dial To Bankruptcy

Corrected on March 16, 2018

This article originally misstated the amount of reorganized common stock that senior debt holders will receive upon iHeartMedia's restructuring — it is 94 percent, not 91.79 as originally written. It also misstated the amount of new senior debt to be established — it is $5.75 billion, not $5.41 billion.

All Things Considered

Why President Trump's Nominee For CIA Director Is In Danger Of Not Getting Confirmed

Corrected on March 16, 2018

During this conversation, journalist Raymond Bonner discusses his reporting for ProPublica. His story asserted that Gina Haspel, who has been nominated to be the next CIA director, played a role in the treatment of al-Qaida suspect Abu Zubaydah during interrogations at a "black site" in Thailand and that she had "mocked" Zubaydah. On March 15, ProPublica issued a retraction, a correction and an apology. Haspel was not in charge of that black site at the time of Zubaydah's interrogations and had not mocked his complaints about the treatment.

All Things Considered

'The Woman's Hour' Documents Pivotal Leaders In The Fight For Suffrage

Corrected on March 15, 2018

During this interview, our guest misspoke and said that all Southern states had rejected the 19th Amendment by the summer of 1920. In fact, some Southern states, including Arkansas, Kentucky, Texas and West Virginia, had ratified the 19th Amendment at that point.

After Sexual Misconduct Claims, Vegas Mogul Steve Wynn Fell Fast

Corrected on March 15, 2018

A previous version of this story said the SEC filing referring to Steve Wynn's severance was filed on Feb. 16. It was actually filed on Feb. 15. In addition, the story said two massage therapists filed complaints the week of March 6. The complaints were filed the previous week.

Across The Country, Students Walk Out To Protest Gun Violence

Corrected on March 14, 2018

In a previous version of this post, two high schools were identified with inaccurate locations. Corner Canyon High School is located in Draper, Utah, not Draper, Colo.; Hillsboro High School is located in Nashville, Tenn., not Hillsboro, Tenn.

GOP Pours Cash Into Pennsylvania Special Election To Prevent An Upset Defeat

Corrected on March 13, 2018

A previous version of this story said that Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's appearance in southwest Pennsylvania was a campaign appearance. Zinke's office clarified it was an official appearance to announce a grant program for reclaiming abandoned coal mines. Pennsylvania is expected to get 19 percent of total national funds. Rick Saccone was among the local politicians attending the event. Two House Democrats subsequently alleged that Zinke used federal dollars to promote Saccone's candidacy; they called for an investigation by the Office of Special Counsel, which handles ethics cases.

All Things Considered

Sorry, Adults, No New Neurons For Your Aging Brains

Corrected on March 13, 2018

In the audio and an earlier Web version of this report, it was said that 59 brains were studied. In fact, 59 samples from 29 brains were used.

How To Get People To See A Doctor When They Don't Want To

Corrected on March 12, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the Tsimane are descendants of the Incas. It also gave an inaccurate estimate for the number of people in a village of 100 who had come to a visiting medical team for care. That number is 70, not 30.

All Things Considered

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Reopens After Shooting

Corrected on March 12, 2018

In this report, we say that 17 crosses were placed at a memorial for those killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. In fact, the memorials also included Stars of David in memory of the Jewish victims.

Morning Edition

Some Unions Concerned About Steel Tariffs

Corrected on March 8, 2018

A previous headline incorrectly said that unions are divided over the steel tariffs. Some unions have concerns, but they say there is no division.

The Spy Who Trolled Me

Corrected on March 7, 2018

In the audio, the Russian operation is mispronounced. It is Project Lakhta, not Project Latka.

The U.S. Positions Warships In Tense Asia-Pacific Waters

Corrected on March 6, 2018

An earlier version of this story and a previous correction should have included Philippine journalists as being among those invited aboard the USS Carl Vinson. Journalists from the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia and the United States were invited.

All Things Considered

Miracle Of Hemophilia Drugs Comes At A Steep Price

Corrected on March 6, 2018

This initial Web version of this article misstated Bayer's U.S. sales of hemophilia drugs in 2016. Sales were 1.17 billion euros or $1.45 billion, not 1.66 billion euros in 2016, or $2 billion.

All Things Considered

New Report Predicts Rising Tides, More Flooding

Corrected on March 5, 2018

An earlier version of this story incorrectly referred to the Center for Climate and National Security. It is the Center for Climate and Security.

A Secretive Sect Opens A Debate On Female Genital Mutilation

Corrected on March 5, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly spelled Leena Khandwala's last name as Khandwalla and imprecisely gave her place of residence. She lives in New Jersey and travels often to Pakistan — she does not divide her time between the two places. She married about two decades ago, not a decade ago. And the story also incorrectly said she began having sex before marriage.

Sexual Assault Claim Against Conductor Dutoit Is Credible, Boston Symphony Says

Corrected on March 3, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the Boston Symphony Orchestra released two statements regarding sexual misconduct and a BSO conductor in a single day.

Charles Dutoit was a frequent guest conductor at the BSO for over 35 years, but he did not hold a formal title with the orchestra.

Mike Huckabee Resigns From Music Education Board After Fierce Backlash From Nashville

Corrected on March 3, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to Kim Davis as the former clerk of Casey County, Ky., and said that she had been replaced by David Ermold. A previous correction also incorrectly said Casey County. Davis is still the clerk of Rowan County, Ky.; Ermold is running against her for the seat but an election has not yet been held.

All Things Considered

Why Pedestrian Deaths Are At A 33-Year High And How To Prevent Them

Corrected on March 2, 2018

An earlier version of this story stated that there was a 42 percent increase in pedestrian deaths in Los Angeles since the mayor launched an initiative to eliminate traffic fatalities two years ago. In fact, it was an 80 percent increase.

All Things Considered

Trump Says Administration Working On 'Very Very Strong' Policies To Combat Opioids

Corrected on March 2, 2018

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that North Dakota first lady Kathryn Helgaas Burgum is recovering from opioid addiction, as guidance from the White House said. The North Dakota governor's office clarifies that Helgaas Burgum is a recovering alcoholic. She is also an addiction recovery advocate.

Episode 826: The Vodka Proof

Corrected on March 2, 2018

In a previous version of this podcast, we said Grey Goose vodka is four times distilled. In fact, it is distilled only once.

All Things Considered

'I Can't Believe I Am The First,' Says Oscar-Nominated Female Cinematographer

Corrected on March 1, 2018

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, the movie Fruitvale Station is incorrectly described as being based on a real-life murder by two transit cops. The killing was actually classified as involuntary manslaughter; one officer was convicted.

Spotify Files Papers For Its Entry To The Stock Market

Corrected on February 28, 2018

This article and its headline originally mischaracterized the entry of Spotify's stock into the public market — it will allow its privately held shares to be liquidated publicly, not generate an additional $1 billion in capital.

Weekend Edition Saturday

In Ohio, Some Teachers Have Been Armed For Years

Corrected on February 28, 2018

A previous Web introduction to this story incorrectly said that the Ohio program trains teachers who will open-carry firearms. The program is for concealed-carry training.

'If You Want To Be Somewhere, You've Got To Occupy It'

Corrected on February 28, 2018

A previous version of this article mischaracterized the amount of time Emily Lazar has spent in the recording industry. She has worked as a mastering engineer for more than 20 years.

Morning Edition

Should Polling Places Remain Politics-Free? Justices Incredulous At Both Sides

Corrected on February 28, 2018

In the audio of this story, as well as in a previous version of the Web story, we say 50 states had laws on intimidation and harassment at the polls around the turn of the 20th century. There were not 50 states at the time. In addition, a previous version of this story misspelled Andrew Cilek's last name as Celik. Also, in the audio, as in a previous Web version, Virginia Gelms is incorrectly identified as the elections manager for Minneapolis; Gelms is the elections manager for Hennepin County.

First Human Case From New Bird Flu: How Many More Strains Are Out There?

Corrected on February 26, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated the number of possible H and N combinations. There are 18 versions of hemagglutinin and 11 versions of neuraminidase, making a total of 198 subtypes of influenza A, not 144.

A previous version of this story also incorrectly stated the function of neuraminidase. The virus uses neuraminidase while exiting the cell, not entering the cell.

All Things Considered

Automakers Say Trump's Anti-NAFTA Push Could Upend Their Industry

Corrected on February 26, 2018

An earlier version of this story said the average amount of U.S. content in a Ford vehicle sold in the U.S. is 80 percent, according to Joe Hinrichs, Ford's head of global operations. In fact, 80 percent refers to the share of Ford vehicles sold in the U.S. that were assembled in the U.S.

All Things Considered

An Anarchist Explains How Hackers Could Cause Global Chaos

Corrected on February 26, 2018

Previous audio and Web versions of this story said that Barrett Brown heard about Anonymous in 2003. In fact, it was in 2006. Also, the raid on Brown referenced in those versions of the story took place in his apartment, not his mother's home, and he posted the YouTube video after a previous raid at his mother's home. Additionally, those versions said Brown had served time in prison for being part of Anonymous. While he was connected to Anonymous, the prison sentence was for threatening a federal officer and other charges to which he pleaded guilty.

And in the audio, as in the previous Web version, Brown's project is called Pursuant. The actual name of the project is Pursuance. Also, in the audio version we say that Stratfor was involved in top-secret government missions like the killing of Osama bin Laden. We should have said that Stratfor emails written in the hours after bin Laden's death and released after an Anonymous hack included sensitive information about the mission, not that Stratfor was involved in that mission.

The 'Forgotten Olympians': Winners Even Without Medals

Corrected on February 25, 2018

A previous version of this story misspelled the names of Alexia Paganini and Sofia Goggia.

This post had also suggested that 2,646 athletes wouldn't win medals – an incorrect total that does not account for the multiple medals given out in sports with more than one competitor. It's still accurate that most of the 2,952 athletes who compete in the 2018 Winter Games will not earn a medal.

One By One, Companies Cut Ties With The NRA

Corrected on February 24, 2018

A previous caption, relying on information from Getty Images, incorrectly said the photo of the NRA booth was taken on the first day of CPAC. It was actually taken Friday.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Sometimes We Feel More Comfortable Talking To A Robot

Corrected on February 24, 2018

In a previous version of this story, Brent Hoff's last name was misspelled as Huff. In addition, the story incorrectly said Alexander Reben's experiments began while he was working on his Ph.D. He was actually working on his master's at the time.

What Can A Personality Test Tell Us About Who We Are?

Corrected on February 21, 2018

In the audio for this story, interviewee Adam Grant gives inaccurate definitions of scientific reliability and validity. According to the American Psychological Association, validity is defined as "t]he extent to which a test measures what it was intended to measure." The APA defines reliability as "[t]he degree to which a test produces similar scores each time it is used; stability or consistency of the scores produced by an instrument."

Weekend Edition Saturday

Rep. Jackie Speier On Indictment Of Russians

Corrected on February 18, 2018

In an earlier version of this post, Rep. Speier was identified as representing Florida. She represents California.

How The U.S. Ambassador To China May Have Xi Jinping's Ear

Corrected on February 18, 2018

A previous version of this story said President Trump's son Eric Trump ran the then-candidate Trump's election campaign in Iowa. It was then-Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad's son Eric Branstad who led the Iowa campaign.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Puzzle: End Rhymes

Corrected on February 18, 2018

A previous version of this puzzle featured the wrong challenge for next week.

All Things Considered

Is There Any Way For Schools To Prevent Shootings?

Corrected on February 15, 2018

In a previous audio version of this story, we incorrectly said there has never been a female school shooter. In fact, there have been some females who committed school shootings.

Democrats Take Republican Seat In Florida Special Election

Corrected on February 14, 2018

A previous version of this story and caption incorrectly said that Margaret Good's victory was by 7 percent and that the district had previously voted for President Trump by 5 percent. Those numbers are actually percentage points.

Attorney Says He Paid Adult Film Actress Who Alleges Affair With Trump

Corrected on February 14, 2018

An earlier summary of this report on the homepage mistakenly stated that attorney Michael Cohen said his $130,000 payment was reimbursed by either the Trump campaign or the Trump Organization. In fact, he has said the payment was not reimbursed by either the campaign or the Trump Organization and that it came from his own pocket.

White House Budget Calls For Deep Cuts To HUD

Corrected on February 14, 2018

In an earlier version of this story, we misstated the source for a figure. The Trump administration, not Congress, added $2 billion to its earlier HUD funding request.

All Things Considered

Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things

Corrected on February 14, 2018

In this story, we refer to Toby Groves' lie in 2004 on his mortgage loan application as "his first bad act." We should have noted that according to court records, Groves admitted that he began the "scheme" to defraud banks "on or about June 30, 2003." In addition, court records show he admitted to owing the federal Internal Revenue Service $299,997 for claims made about the tax years 2001-2003.

Also in this story, Groves discusses what he sees as a key moment in his life — his brother's 1986 bank fraud conviction. Groves describes what he says was his father's anguish over a front-page newspaper story. Our Web coverage includes illustrations that make it appear as if a photo of Groves' brother was on the front page and that the family's name was in the headline. But archives show that the Cincinnati Enquirer's coverage did not include a front-page image of Groves' brother. The family's name was not in the headline. Instead, the brother's name appeared inside the newspaper.

The details about others in this report — including researchers Lamar Pierce, Francesca Gino and Ann Tenbrunsel — are not in question.

The blog Paul Vanderveen's Attitude of Reciprocity drew NPR's attention back to this story.

Why People Do Bad Things

Corrected on February 14, 2018

In this story, we refer to Toby Groves' lie in 2004 on his mortgage loan application as "his first bad act." We should have noted that according to court records, Groves admitted that he began the "scheme" to defraud banks "on or about June 30, 2003." In addition, court records show he admitted to owing the federal Internal Revenue Service $299,997 for claims made about the tax years 2001-2003.

Also in this story, Groves discusses what he sees as a key moment in his life — his brother's 1986 bank fraud conviction. Groves describes what he says was his father's anguish over a front-page newspaper story. Our Web coverage includes illustrations that make it appear as if a photo of Groves' brother was on the front page and that the family's name was in the headline. But archives show that the Cincinnati Enquirer's coverage did not include a front-page image of Groves' brother. The family's name was not in the headline. Instead, the brother's name appeared inside the newspaper.

The details about others in this report — including researchers Lamar Pierce, Francesca Gino and Ann Tenbrunsel — are not in question.

The blog Paul Vanderveen's Attitude of Reciprocity drew NPR's attention back to this story.

Trump To Unveil Long-Awaited $1.5 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

Corrected on February 13, 2018

Administration officials say the president's plan commits $200 billion in federal funding over 10 years to stimulate state and local spending and private investment. A previous version of this story incorrectly said $200 million.

Ask Me Another

Paradigm Shift

Corrected on February 13, 2018

In one clue, we refer to ticks as insects. Ticks are arachnids.

3 Killed In Grand Canyon Helicopter Crash

Corrected on February 12, 2018

In a previous version of this story and headline, NPR reported that four people had been killed. The correct number of casualties is three dead and four injured.

New Leader Of Sinn Fein Looks At Fresh Start For Party

Corrected on February 12, 2018

In a previous version of this story and headline, we incorrectly said that Mary Lou McDonald is the first female leader of Sinn Fein. In fact, Margaret Buckley led the party from 1937 to 1950.

All Things Considered

'A Fantastic Woman' Is As Strong And Complicated As Its Star

Corrected on February 12, 2018

An earlier version of this story used the incorrect pronoun "him" in the sentence "And she's adamant that Marina not attend Orlando's funeral, something she emphasizes by always addressing her as Daniel."

Episode 363: Why People Do Bad Things

Corrected on February 12, 2018

In this story, we refer to Toby Groves' lie in 2004 on his mortgage loan application as "his first bad act." We should have noted that according to court records, Groves admitted that he began the "scheme" to defraud banks "on or about June 30, 2003." In addition, court records show he admitted to owing the federal Internal Revenue Service $299,997 for claims made about the tax years 2001-2003.

Also in this story, Groves discusses what he sees as a key moment in his life — his brother's 1986 bank fraud conviction. Groves describes what he says was his father's anguish over a front-page newspaper story. Our Web coverage includes illustrations that make it appear as if a photo of Groves' brother was on the front page and that the family's name was in the headline. But archives show that the Cincinnati Enquirer's coverage did not include a front-page image of Groves' brother. The family's name was not in the headline. Instead, the brother's name appeared inside the newspaper.

The details about others in this report — including researchers Lamar Pierce, Francesca Gino and Ann Tenbrunsel — are not in question.

The blog Paul Vanderveen's Attitude of Reciprocity drew NPR's attention back to this story.

Women In The Music Industry Call For 'Evolution' At The Grammys

Corrected on February 9, 2018

A previous version of this story stated that the Recording Academy has never asked its members to provide demographic data about themselves. NARAS does collect demographic data on its membership, but does not require that members provide that information. As a result, it does not have complete data on its membership.

NARAS added that it does not collect demographic information on Grammy winners or nominees.

The Difficult Math Of Being Native American

Corrected on February 8, 2018

A previous version of this essay may have implied that the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe uses blood quantum requirements for enrollment. This is not the case.

2 Trade Shows, 2 Portraits Of The American Conservation Movement

Corrected on February 8, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the Great American Outdoor Show is free to all National Rifle Association members. It is free only to new members or to those who renew or upgrade their membership in the NRA.

Weekend Edition Sunday

How To Ease Tensions At Dueling Rallies: Talk

Corrected on February 7, 2018

This report incorrectly refers to a group of demonstrators as Mothers Demand Common Sense For Gun Reform. The correct name is Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.

Morning Edition

Luger Erin Hamlin Plans To Have Fun During Her 4th Olympics

Corrected on February 6, 2018

In this report, we say that Erin Hamlin's medal in Sochi marked the first time an American luger reached an Olympic podium. In fact, while she is the first U.S. singles luger to win a medal, there have been U.S. doubles lugers who have won medals.

All Things Considered

Candidates In San Francisco Mayoral Race Show How Much Tech Has Changed The City

Corrected on February 5, 2018

In this report, we say Brad Chapin was among dozens of people testifying in support of London Breed, San Francisco's acting mayor. As Chapin said at a public meeting, he believes the acting or appointed mayor should be a woman of color such as Breed. But his preferred candidate for mayor in the June election is a different city supervisor, Jane Kim.

Woman Reported Missing In California Found On 'The Bachelor'

Corrected on February 3, 2018

A caption on a previous version of this story incorrectly spelled Rebekah Martinez's first name as Rebecca. In addition, we incorrectly said there were two dozen contestants on Season 22 of The Bachelor. There were 29.

Morning Edition

Wave Of Capitalist Optimism Sweeps Across Paris

Corrected on January 31, 2018

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say the Station F space covers 110,000 square feet. In fact, it's 366,000 square feet.

Living Well Now: What Does It Take?

Corrected on January 31, 2018

A previous version of this post said 10 planetary boundaries have been identified. In fact, nine have been identified.

All Things Considered

Director Of ICE Discusses Immigration Enforcement And Proposals

Corrected on January 29, 2018

In the interview, Thomas Homan said ICE "will not turn a blind eye to somebody that we find during our enforcement operations that's in the country illegally." A previous version of the transcript was incorrect. He did not say "in the country legally."

Weekend Edition Saturday

School Shootings Are Sad, But No Longer Surprising

Corrected on January 27, 2018

In the audio, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say that at least 16 people were shot in addition to the two fatalities. Not all of those who were injured were shot.

A Superhero Movie Got A Screenplay Nomination: Glitch Or Game-Changer?

Corrected on January 25, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Spider-Man 2 was only nominated for sound mixing and visual effects. In fact, it won for visual effects and was nominated for both sound mixing and sound editing. In addition, the story also said The Incredibles won for best animated feature in 2004. The movie was released in 2004 but won its Oscar in 2005. Also, the story said The Dark Knight was passed over for best picture in 2008. The movie came out in 2008, but the nominations and awards show were in 2009.

All Things Considered

Culture Is Shifting in Socially Conservative Ireland

Corrected on January 25, 2018

In this story, we say that more than 700 women sought abortions in England or Wales in 2016. In fact, 3,265 women from the Republic of Ireland went there for abortions, and that covers only those who provided clinics with Irish addresses.

Previously posted on Jan. 8: We say that Irish voters elected a gay, biracial prime minister. In fact, Leo Varadkar was chosen by members of the governing party, Fine Gael, to be leader of their party after the election — and he became Ireland's taoiseach (prime minister) as a result of that party vote.

Morning Edition

When Dating Felt Like A Job, One Woman Hired A Matchmaker

Corrected on January 23, 2018

A previous version of this Web story said Three Day Rule's database of singles came from partnerships with online dating sites. The company's singles database is separate from its online dating site partnerships.

Morning Edition

Part Of Oregon's Funding Plan For Medicaid Goes Before Voters

Corrected on January 23, 2018

Previous audio and Web versions of this story suggested that Americans are no longer legally required to buy health insurance. That's incorrect. The individual mandate to buy health insurance that was part of the Affordable Care Act — requiring Americans to buy health insurance or face a financial penalty — is still in effect until 2019. Additionally, former President Barack Obama's first name was misspelled as Barak.

All Things Considered

Undocumented Irish Caught In Trump's Immigration Dragnet

Corrected on January 22, 2018

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that Dylan O'Riordan was brought to the U.S. on a visitor's visa. He came under the visa waiver program.

Government Hurtles Toward Midnight Shutdown

Corrected on January 19, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Sen. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., said Democrats would support a stopgap measure for three to five days to keep the government running. Van Hollen said they would support a stopgap measure of three to four days. Additionally, Mitch McConnell was incorrectly identified as the Senate minority leader. He is the majority leader.

Morning Edition

Women's Marches Across The Country Will Focus On The Vote

Corrected on January 19, 2018

An earlier Web version of this story quoted Bob Bland as saying Nevada voted for a Democratic presidential candidate for the first time in 2016. Nevada is a longtime swing state that went to Barack Obama in both the 2008 and 2012 elections.

Turning Soybeans Into Diesel Fuel Is Costing Us Billions

Corrected on January 19, 2018

A previous version of this story stated that Americans will burn 3 billion gallons of diesel fuel made from soybean oil this year. In fact, some of that biodiesel will be made from other oils, including corn oil, canola oil and recycled cooking oil.

DACA Troubles Could Put Spending Bill In Peril

Corrected on January 18, 2018

An earlier version of this story erroneously stated the DACA program will end in March 2017. The correct date for the end of the program is March 2018, absent a new law codifying it or a further delay of its termination by the Trump administration.

Morning Edition

Bill Changes How Congressional Sexual Harassment Claims Are Handled

Corrected on January 18, 2018

In this story, we say that two members of Congress, Sen. Al Franken and Rep. John Conyers, have resigned over allegations of sexual misconduct. In fact, Rep. Trent Franks also resigned, for a total of three.

All Things Considered

Thriving After Prematurity, Fiona The Celebrity Hippo Turns 1

Corrected on January 17, 2018

A previous Web and audio version of this story said the sale of Fiona-related items generated about $3 million for the zoo. However, the $2 million to $3 million number refers to the estimated boost to the local economy from the Fiona-related sales and tourism.

All Things Considered

White House Physician Says Trump Is In 'Excellent Health'

Corrected on January 17, 2018

We say President Trump's cognitive test took 30 minutes to complete. In fact, the White House physician did not say how long the test lasted. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment typically takes about 10 minutes.

Mormon Church Names Russell M. Nelson As New Leader

Corrected on January 16, 2018

A previous version of this story said Russell M. Nelson has 116 grandchildren. In fact, Nelson has 116 great-grandchildren. Additionally, we also quoted Russell M. Nelson as saying, "Two days ago, my brethren of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles laid hands upon my hands." In fact, Nelson said "laid hands upon my head."

Morning Edition

Study: Great Recession Led To Fewer Deaths

Corrected on January 16, 2018

A previous headline incorrectly said that the Great Recession led to fewer deaths among the unemployed. In fact, the decline in mortality is not limited to the unemployed.

The Grunge Gold Rush

Corrected on January 12, 2018

An earlier version of this story used reporting citing the band Cell as having had received a $15 million advance from its label. The band's manager later corrected the figure to $1.5 million.

Weekend Edition Sunday

The Rash Of Troubles At The Census Bureau

Corrected on January 11, 2018

In this story, we say that the Census Bureau's then-director left in May 2017. In fact, he left the bureau in June after his departure was announced in May.

Adding Citizenship Question Risks 'Bad Count' For 2020 Census, Experts Warn

Corrected on January 10, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that the only field test of the 2020 census questions is set to begin in April in Rhode Island's Providence County. The Census Bureau has conducted previous tests of potential questions, and participants in Providence County can take part in the last scheduled field test beginning in March.

Morning Edition

Some Fear 'The Wire' Will Overshadow Showtime's 'The Chi'

Corrected on January 4, 2018

The audio of this story describes Papa, Jake and Kevin as elementary school students. They're actually eighth-graders, but in Chicago, kindergarten through eighth grade is referred to as elementary school.

How Cold Is Too Cold For Pets?

Corrected on January 3, 2018

An earlier Web version of this story credited some information to the American Veterinary Medical Foundation. The information came from the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Morning Edition

News Brief: Fusion GPS Wants Congressional Testimony Made Public

Corrected on January 3, 2018

During this conversation, we mistakenly say that The New York Times reported George Papadopoulos told an Australian diplomat about a meeting between Trump campaign officials and Russian officials. In fact, the Times reported that Papadopoulos told the diplomat that Russia had collected potentially damaging information about Democratic political candidate Hillary Clinton.

Morning Edition

Brexit Puts London's Finance Jobs At Risk

Corrected on January 3, 2018

An earlier transcript referred to Luxembourg for Finance as a government bank. In fact, it is the agency for the development of the Luxembourg financial center.

All Things Considered

Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch Announces Retirement, With Speculation Focused On Romney

Corrected on January 3, 2018

A previous version of this story said that if Mitt Romney ran for Senate from Utah, it would be his first run for Congress. Romney ran for Senate in 1994, losing to Massachusetts Democrat Edward Kennedy. Additionally, Orrin Hatch and Thad Cochran were incorrectly referred to as Senate pro tempore. The correct term is president pro tempore.

The original story incorrectly stated that Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida came in second place in the 2016 Utah GOP caucuses. It was Gov. John Kasich of Ohio.

The Other WWII American-Internment Atrocity

Corrected on January 3, 2018

A reference to all Aleut villages being burned as part of a "scorched earth" policy has been removed because not all the villages were, in fact, burned.

A reference to a quote from a video has been removed because the online transcript of that documentary does not include the quote, in which an Army officer purportedly told Aleuts that "y'all look like Japs."

Details about how and when Aleuts were moved from their villages were removed to clarify that they were not all transported at the same time.

A reference to "Excursion Bay" was fixed to say "Excursion Inlet."

The year the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians was established was 1980, not 1988 as originally published.

A correction posted here on Feb. 22 has been removed because it mistakenly stated that President Reagan signed that commission into law. In fact, it was President Carter.

Weekend Edition Sunday

South Sudan's Prospects For 2018

Corrected on January 2, 2018

In this story, Nikki Haley is described incorrectly as the U.S. ambassador to the United States. In fact, she is the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Puzzle: New Names In The News

Corrected on January 2, 2018

On an earlier Web page, puzzle winner Nick England was mistakenly referred to as Nick English.